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Any antique car or restoration people here?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by DR. HOUSE, Apr 20, 2012.

  1. DR. HOUSE

    DR. HOUSE Everybody Lies

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    Could somebody give me a ballpark idea on what this thing is worth sitting as it is? I think its fair to assume it doesn't run. Most vital parts appear to be intact.
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    Now would anyone have any idea what something in this shape would cost to restore?
    Here's the information I have about it. 1921 Ford Model T 3 Door Touring Car, Complete, Engine In Car Is Free, Seller Has Title
     
  2. 220-9er

    220-9er

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    Last edited: Apr 20, 2012

  3. DR. HOUSE

    DR. HOUSE Everybody Lies

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    Thanks for the link, just what I needed.
     
  4. blk69stang

    blk69stang

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    Drool....

    Wow, that would probably sell for more than I'd be willing to pay, and would probably cost more to restore than I could afford. Heck, the "non-stuck" engine and the title alone make it quite a find. Damn, that is pretty complete for a car for one of that vintage.

    I personally hope it gets restored back to original instead of being chopped up as a "hotrod". There are too few originals left for this one to be butchered, and someone wanting to build a hotrod could easily get a fiberglass repro body. Cutting up that piece of history would be a waste.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2012
  5. silentpoet

    silentpoet

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  6. Adjuster

    Adjuster

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    That is pretty cool to see something like that pretty much untouched and original. Looks to be in very good condition.



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  7. racer11

    racer11

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    My GF's father restored some old early 19??'s Model T truck,,,I have no idea where they found the parts to do it but they sold the vehicle about 4 years ago. I think they only got about 12K for it. They put about 6 times more in it in labor and parts.

    I have a 76 Vett that I have more in resto parts than I will ever get back when it is ever sold. I figure the enjoyment of working on it and driving it is worth the loss dollars. I did not do it for a investment and do not expect a return.

    I do love it when Pretty girls wave at me :supergrin:
     
  8. Tango 1Zero

    Tango 1Zero Millennium Member

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    Go to ford barn its owned by the H.A.M.B. people but more focused on early fords
     
  9. ca survivor

    ca survivor

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    I will love to have an old car like that, restored of course, but the dedication and money to keep it running is not possible for me.
     
  10. slick64

    slick64

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    Most restorations are based on sentimental and not financial reasons. They can cost 2-3x what the car is worth.
     
  11. Zagato

    Zagato

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    Id stick it in a museum as is.
     
  12. AntHill

    AntHill

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    The average restore costs around $35K give or take (this includes parts and labor). Compare that figure to the selling prices on Ebay motors before making any decisions. FWIW
     
  13. RichJ

    RichJ

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    [​IMG]

    Wooden floorboards? How cool. And they are intact too. I'll bet that thing has been sitting in a barn out of the weather.

    Very awesome.

    Sidenote: A guy at work was given an old 1950's MF tractor that was "complete" but was in about the same rusted condition as that car. After dissasembling and sandblasting the rust off, he primed and painted it, new gaskets for the engine and bolted it back together. When he was done it looked mint and belonged on a show room floor. He told me the biggest expense was a new set of tires but all in all he only had about $1,500 in it. I believe he showed it at a fair and was offered $15,000 or $16,000 for it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2012
  14. Bill Powell

    Bill Powell Cross Member CLM

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    When Ford ordered parts they specified the crate size and the type of wood they were to be made from, and the crates became floor boards and such like that.

    All the wood they could not use was burned for charcoal and pressed into charcoal briquettes. Ford held the patent for sacks of charcoal and Kingsford was the brand name.

    If it already has electric start it is worth doing. It looks like a 1915 or 16 and did not come from the factory with and electric starter.

    Wheher it's doable dependa on how much of the work you can do. If you can do the work you're probably looking at about a five thousand dollar build to have something good enough for a fun buggy.
     
  15. jtull7

    jtull7 Pistolero CLM

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    Bill, the second photo clearly shows the starter crank under the radiator. Of course, someone could have put a starter in and just left the crank handle for authenticity.
     
  16. Bill Powell

    Bill Powell Cross Member CLM

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    Most people, especially the who converted to electric start kept the crank handle. Ford didn't get the electric starter until 1919 or 20 and as long as that one has been down, I'd bet you money, not a lot, that this car was never converted.

    We had a 1913 roadster at the museum that could sit for three months and start with the first yank on its crank. Problem was that whiloe sitting the clutches would stick and as soon as the engine fired it would start chasing you. You had to stay ahead of it for fifteen or twenty feet and the clutches would free up and it would stop, looking a little disappointed cause it didn't catch you.
     
  17. knightkrawler00

    knightkrawler00

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    Here's a good question.

    Which pedal is the throttle? :whistling:
     
  18. GT4494

    GT4494

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    Playing with and restoring antique cars is for love not profit. You will never get out of it what you will put into it. But there is no better feeling then driving around in an original Model A.

    Model T's are not conducive to driving on the street unless you are in a parade.
     
  19. Bill Powell

    Bill Powell Cross Member CLM

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    Neither pedal is the throttle. The left pedal is high range and low range, push the pedal all the way in for low range and all the way out for high range. The center pedal is reverse and the right pedal is the brake. The throttle is the hand throttle. The parking brake, when you engage it, pulls the left pedal into neutral for starting. The car takes a lot of getting used to to drive comfortably.

    I agree with the other people on a full restoration cost, but this car does not need a full restoration to have fun with it.

    I didn't fully answer a question earlier. The T had a crank as standard issue as long as they made them, up to 1927. The later cars had cranks, but they were not permanently attached.
     
  20. sombunya

    sombunya Use it up, throw it away

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    That is an extremely cool vehicle.

    Cars are a poor investment, if making money is the goal. One can routinely see cars sell for less than invested in on the auction shows on the tube.

    I love cars and have a 1969 Cobra in the garage.