another 223 reload question (sorry)

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by GLOCK4536, Feb 5, 2010.

  1. GLOCK4536

    GLOCK4536 Go Flyers!!!

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    I'm about to get into reloading 223 for my savage rifle and was told today that i shouldn't use military brass to do so because of it having a thicker wall and will produce to much pressure and would be dangerous. I did read on some of the other threads that if i didn't load to max that it should be ok. If someone on here that is doing the same reloading for a bolt gun using military brass could tell me how to use both non-military and reg brass to get the same out both ,if it is possible in the first place. If it's not safe than i'll just load with reg brass and not use the other.Again thanks for reading this and for all who helps me with this!!!
     
  2. rg1

    rg1

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    Here's a good article on .223 reloading and it has a couple charts showing case weights and case capacity. Most military .223/5.56 brass has nearly the same weight and capacity as commercial brass. Now in .308 brass military brass may be thicker and heavier. You should have no problems loading military brass for your rifle, just having to deal with crimped primer pockets, and watch for damage to case rims from being fired in military rifles. Also check closely for possible case stretching to catch any case with signs of separations, just like you should do with any brass from unknown sources. No reason not to use good once fired military brass when working up loads for your rifle.http://www.6mmbr.com/223Rem.html
     

  3. kirgi08

    kirgi08 Watcher. Silver Member

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    There is no "stupid" question in reloading.............. If you don't know ASK. Jack and a bunch of folk will be glad ta help.'08.
     
  4. steve4102

    steve4102

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    From Sierra.

    The conventional wisdom to reduce loads with military brass is familiar to most reloaders and is generally good advice. The rationale here is that the military cases tend to be somewhat thicker and heavier than their civilian counterparts, which in turn reduces capacity and raises pressures. This additional pressure normally requires a one or two grain reduction from the loads shown in most manuals or other data developed with commercial cases. While this is most often the situation with both 308 Winchester and 30-06 cases, it is less true with the 223 brass. We have found that military cases often have significantly more capacity than several brands of commercial brass. Again, take the time to do a side-by-side comparison of the cases you are working with and adjust your load as needed. There may be no need for such a reduction with the 223. Know your components and keep them segregated accordingly.
     
  5. TrooperBrian

    TrooperBrian

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    Oh wow that I would not have expected.

    No need to apologize, we're all here to learn.

    Assuming you'll want precision loads, you need to separate the brass based on their weight and headstamp. So basically everything with LC07 or something would be in one batch, then go to about 5-10% STDEV, which is about a one grain range or so.

    I've heard of people going over max with no problems for varmint hunting, I see it as a rather dangerous practice, but no kabooms yet.
     
  6. ron59

    ron59 Bustin Caps

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    I could be wrong here... but isn't "military .223" ammo actually 5.56? That was what I've always thought.

    .223 and 5.56 are VERY similiar, but yes, the increased brass thickness causes a significant change in pressures. You can fire .223 ammo in a gun chambered for 5.56, but you should not do the reverse. Not because the cartridge won't fit, but more because of the increased pressures.

    One source:
    http://www.thegunzone.com/556v223.html
    And TONS more similar sites via google, just enter ".223 vs 5.56" or something similar.

    But if you're reloading.... YOU get to control the "pressures" via your load. So if you have some 5.56 brass, I would think you could decrease the amount of powder to the point where it would work fine in your .223 gun.

    When I buy an AR, I'm going to be getting one chambered for 5.56 so this isn't even an issue.
     
  7. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve Decap Pin Killa

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    Start low, work up... your gun will tell you what it likes.
     
  8. GLOCK4536

    GLOCK4536 Go Flyers!!!

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    Thanks everybody! this helps alot!! i have reloaded 1000's of rounds but it was just for handguns and i'm very very new to the rifle part of it and with the 223/5.56 deal and me not happy with just MOA, i'm trying to learn everything i can on this bullet. AGAIN GREAT JOB AND ANSWERS!!