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Annual vaccines needed for indoor only pets?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by bchandler, Jan 4, 2010.

  1. bchandler

    bchandler

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    I have an indoor only cat. I live in a 3rd story apartment, so he is indoors at all times. Occasionally he will go out onto the screened in porch, which is of course isolated from other animals. He has no contact with any other animals. Does a pet such as this require annual vaccines? What could he possibly catch animal diseases from? The annual vet checkup and vaccines cost a little under $100, and for the checkup all they do is feel his body and listen with a stethoscope. So if I can skip it, I probably would!
     
  2. Lone_Wolfe

    Lone_Wolfe Sandbox Refugee CLM

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    My 12 year old cat has vaccine induced fibrosarcoma, which is a type of cancer. I wish I'd stopped giving her vaccines a lot sooner than I did. :crying:
     

  3. *ASH*

    *ASH* FURBANITE

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    the now acceptable range is every 3 to 4 years . we got 4 cats 3 dogs , and we go by that routine,
     
  4. hardeyes

    hardeyes

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    Hello;

    There are many Virus's that are airborne, You should keep regular vaccinations for all your pets.

    Try hitting up your local feed stores, about low cost clinics that offer shots for dogs/cats.

    They only charge for the shot, and that it.

    If you are somewhat confident, you can also order vaccinations thru Pet Supply Companies.

    They offer shots from various companies, and may even offer more protection for your pet, than the vaccinations your vet is giving.

    hardeyes
     
  5. bchandler

    bchandler

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    Ok, this worries me. Never heard of it before. Is it only associated with a certain type of vaccine? I'll have to read up on it.

    As for the every 3 or 4 years thing, are there special 3 year shots, or does this apply to the standard annual shot?

    Thanks for the input hardeyes. My mother had a kitten spayed at the local humane society, and the cost was about a quarter of the vet, so that is an option for me. About the airborne viruses- isn't that more like if there is another pet in the house sneezing? Is it even possible he could catch something on a 3rd floor balcony?
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2010
  6. bchandler

    bchandler

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  7. goldenlight

    goldenlight

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    Feline distemper can live for over a YEAR on outdoor surfaces.

    You could bring it in on your shoes or clothing.

    By the time your cat develops symptoms, it is usually too late to do anything.

    Most cities REQUIRE rabies vaccine.

    If you cat managed to bite a child, (or anyone, for that matter) they would have to examine your cat's BRAIN, to diagnose if he MIGHT have had the disease.

    I don't like vaccines either, but in the end, you cat may be much better off.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2010
  8. JuneyBooney

    JuneyBooney

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    I don't give my indoor cats vaccines even though they are supposedly required. I had a dog back a few years ago who was overdue on shots and fine and dandy but after he got the required vaccines he was dead in six months from some sort of cancer. It cost me a ton of money trying to save him and I still get teary eyed thinking of him. You can have his "titer"(sic) checked to see if he/she needs any shots but I would probably steer clear after the initial kitten shots. Just my opinion.
     
  9. JuneyBooney

    JuneyBooney

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    Sorry to hear about your kitty.Hopefully the kitty can beat this and be with you for a while longer. That does suck. I am sure they told you the vaccines were necessary too.
     
  10. bchandler

    bchandler

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    Just wondering, did you read the article I posted? It argues a viral vaccination is effective for the life of the animal and booster shots are not necessary (unlike toxin vaccinations such as tetanus which must be renewed, of which there are currently none available to pets). Are there any human viral vaccines which require booster shots, besides a few very close to the initial injection?

    Also, as there is positively zero chance of my cat fighting a racoon, skunk, etc, I don't feel rabies vaccination is necessary for the health of the animal. I understand the animal must be destroyed if it bites someone without a vaccine, but the cat doesn't bite unless lightly while roughhousing (playing). Also, I would not have the type of person in my house who would destroy my pet if it somehow bit them. It is a remotely tiny risk which I acknowledge and am willing to take, and personally feel the vaccination caries more risk.

    I know that article is not absolute, but it makes a convincing argument and was written by two doctors who are veterinary immunologists. Also, I have not read any counter-point articles by similarly reputable authors, so I may have an incomplete picture of the situation. Do you know of any that argue for yearly vaccines?
     
  11. JuneyBooney

    JuneyBooney

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    I believe animal shots would probably be good for the average life of the pet just like humans who get polio shots which are good for many years. The only time your cat would need an updated rabies shot is if he comes into contact with a rabid animal. I would get shots which help the pet and don't cause it harm.
     
  12. varget

    varget

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    Our cats are indoors only as well. We do not vaccinate other than the kitten shots. The state requires all kinds of shots but our vet has had the common sense to leave us alone and just treat them if they really need care. On average they live about 15 to 17 yrs. We had one live for 25 yrs. as she was pretty tough. My brother thought I was negligent until he had some instances where he lost cats to cancers caused by injections. The state may know best but they are often WRONG about many things. Follow your own common sense.
    Best, Dave
     
  13. AA#5

    AA#5

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    Fear is used as a sales tool to sell drugs & vaccines to pets and people. Obviously, it works for many people.
     
  14. NanH

    NanH

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    Your indoor cat will not need feline luekemia shots. For distemper and other shots, I do titer tests.