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where i shop, i take the Angus label before their store labels, a very notable difference. Angus is far better than anything they set out. now, Angus is a breed so i'll bet there is a difference between herds. there are other breeds that are as good or better but it comes down to the work and knowledge of the people raising the cattle. and i agree, good Bison is as good or better than Beef. where we used to deer hunt we could bring home some fantastic venison. wild animals are only as good as the food they eat and the quality of their life.
 

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Angus beef is kind of like free range chicken. The cattle feed on natural pasture grasses, etc. instead of being fattened up with artificial hormones in a feed lot. The meat tends to have a better flavor and is pretty lean.

If you want really lean meat, go with buffalo meat. It is delicious and very lean. I used to buy it from the Shoshone/Bannock tribe in Idaho. Expensive but worth it. Very flavorful.
 

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Steak all tastes the same -

First cook it extra well done - then cover it in ketchup -



Kidding - just kidding - I do like a little horseradish sauce on my steak - but no ketchup.
 

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Senior Moment
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Discussion Starter #25
Angus beef is kind of like free range chicken. The cattle feed on natural pasture grasses, etc. instead of being fattened up with artificial hormones in a feed lot. The meat tends to have a better flavor and is pretty lean.
I don't think it makes much difference if used in a burger and covered in lettuce, onions, tomatoes and secret sauce.
 

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We just use mustard and onions. I like large whole slices of onion and I fry the sourdough bread on both sides in Kerry Gold Butter so that it has a crusty butter taste. We don't do tomatoes, but Wifey likes a little lettuce on her burgers.
I have a glass of inexpensive Bordeaux with mine.
 
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If you take a steer from the pasture to the processor, you can definitely tell Longhorn, from the others. I have very sensitive taste ability, but most people will notice, on fresh meat.

For some reason all of the fresh beef I’ve had, from the ranch, tastes different than anything I buy at the grocery store. We have some local processors that sell locally raised beef. That is much better tasting than the “same” cuts I can get from any of the large grocery stores.
We buy meat based on different ideals. I won’t buy a steak without good marbling. I also eat the fat, except the hard fat found on certain cuts.
In todays supermarket you won't find beef than can compare with beef produced in the 60's and early 70's. They downgraded the beef grades back then, and it's never been the same since. I sure miss those days.

Today it's not fed as well and not aged enough. If the beef isn't properly fattened in the first place, hanging (aging) it longer does no good. BTW, hanging (aging) is just a name for a controlled rotting process. But done properly, it sure makes the beef taste good.

If it's properly fattened and you can find a butcher willing to hang it long enough, you won't beat the taste. That's why I raise and fatten my own. I just started feeding my usual two last week. Mine are Hereford Angus cross steers. I'll get them slaughtered by my processor next March. I sell one and one half, and keep one half for my families use. Good beef.
 

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Depends on your taste sensitivity
I recently compared costco Organic Hamburger to Waygu hamburger...no significant difference to me, and liked the former better.
My taste is very simple: it's good or bad. Nothing in between. Food is food
Really...

I am tempted to drop some money for waygu... but figure I'll screw it up! lol
 

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If you are really serious about good beef then spend sometime and get up to speed on what they call yield grades. There are five, You will probably never see a yield grade one, but you can see several yield grade two. But you will not see them in the grocers case, take a strip loin for example or even that of rib eyes. Buy the entire loin. On one side the fat cap side should be a raised tab. This should have USDA stamp or number on it. If the fat cap does not have a raised tab on it it is a four or a five. On entire loins they want that tab left as it indicates the better quality meats. So when meat gets graded, the USDA inspector will be told they need so many yeild grades two for instance So they will grade so many until they get so many needed. Does that mean the rest are nasty? Not at all, it means if they had been graded they would probably grade out a two also, but they did not get graded as a two but just certified beef maybe better and moved on. That is why you might get a great steak from the market one day and the next it is shoe leather. If you buy individual steaks look for good marbling, FAT and streaks of it through the meat. THere is the flavor in the fat or marbling. Also
look for vein steaks or a spot of tough meat.
If you like steak,but a whole loin, look or feel for the tab. the raised spot on the fat cap. then take it home and cut your own steaks. the thickness you want.
 

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Why you not ever see any labeled pkg's of Herford beef in the grocery store? Herford is just as good if not better.
 

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My family are meat eaters. We have meat everyday of the week except Fridays. We are mackerel-snappers on that day. Only grilled ribeyes for steaks, the rest are stews. My wife loves to cook stewed ox-tail or just chuck roast or brisket chopped up. A Filipino neighbor turned her on to a sauce mix called "Mama Sita's" available at oriental stores. She uses the Caldereta or Kare-kare mix which is a peanut flavored for the ox tail. Excellent recipe is printed on the back of the packet. She does the same with pork, lots of vegestables can be had with or without rice. They also go great with bread. I've set the ref's temp between 37 or 40 degrees so I can dry age my ribeyes on a wire rack for 3 days to a few weeks. All depend on the hunger pangs.
Chow down on the tasty cow, pork, or lamb...bon appetiti
 

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What do you call a cow that’s having a seizure?


















Beef jerky.
 
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