An Introduction

Discussion in 'Moto Club' started by g_man500a, May 22, 2005.

  1. g_man500a

    g_man500a

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    Hello,

    I've been a relatively active member in other parts of GT but have never posted here before. I have been lurking at this club for a couple weeks now because I have desperately been wanting to get a bike and get into riding.

    I have ridden in the past, but it was very limited, so I will say that I am relatively unexperienced. I am interested in getting onto a sport bike, but have read the posts about not getting a machine too powerful for an inexperienced rider. Are theier any recommendations that you guys could make? I am 6'3" about 250lbs. Also, the cheaper the better. I don't even have any budget for a bike right now, but I'd like to know how much I need to start saving to get one.

    Also, I understand the importance of wearing the proper protective gear while riding, but I must say that after reading the sayings of "there are those who have dropped a bike, and those who will" and other such things and hearing the guys talk about how many crashes they've been in, I'm kind of scared. How badly does it hurt when you go down? I'm really not so much afraid of pain(I have an extremely high tolerance), but I am worried of being maimed or something like that. Please don't take that as me saying I'm a panzy rider, but I'd just like to know about what to expect, and I'd be glad to hear any of ya'lls experiences of doing down.

    Thanks guys. I appreciate it.
     
  2. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    g-man,

    You've asked some tough but good questions.

    First thing first, Motorcycle Safety Foundation Basic Ridercourse. Gotta have it if you know what's good for you. It's money well spent. They teach you the basic riding skills and street riding techniques. The biggest reason for people dropping bikes is that they don't know how to control their bikes. There is more to motorcycling than just clutch, gear, and brake levers.

    As far as dropping the bike and hurt, it's all depending on how and and when. You can drop it at a stop (which I did, twice, in the same day, on each side of the bike) where only your feelings got hurt and the bike got a bit scratched. Or you can drop it at speed of which a lot of hurt will result. Unless there is a massive mechanical failure on the bike or the road was screwed up, dropping the bike is usually the rider's fault. Believe it or not, you can anticipate what the car/truck drivers do.

    Don't worry about being a pansy rider. I am proud to be a pansy rider because I'm in one piece and breathing at the end of the ride. I'll let the gung ho badazzes kill themselves showing off to the chicks. There are old riders and there are bold riders, but there aren't a lot of old, bold riders.

    Normally I'd recommend a 250-cc of some sort like a Kawasaki Ninja 250, but you're a big person that the bike may be too cramped for you to sit on and manipulate the controls. See if you can find something like a standard bike (aka naked bike) in the 500-cc range or 600-cc range. Something like a Suzuki SV650. Or a V-Strom DL650. They are plenty sporty and they are plentifully available, at least with the SV650 anyway. I really don't know how much they cost as used. But probably think around $3000-4000 range. Or better yet some really old (early to mid 1990s) bikes. You just need something to learn on and enjoy introduction into motorcycling for a year or so and then move to something else.

    Don't fall for the stupid line "oh yeah, you'll outgrow that thing in six months". That's gotta be the most idiotic line I've ever heard! :soap:

    My best friend's bro-in-law asked me to help him get into motorcycling and maybe help him go scout for a used 250-cc (he's a small fellow). I went to a motorcycle dealership (Malcolm Smith Yamaha Suzuki BMW in Riverside) and talked briefly to a sales rep about used bikes in small displacements. The first thing out of his mouth was that to "get him a big one because he'll outgrow the small one in six months". I tell you what, that joint will NEVER get my business and my friends' businesses if I can help it.

    I understand that a dealership isn't obligated or even responsible for you being a dumbass (as in walking in and insisting on buying the latest and greatest crotch rocket with 170-hp at the rear wheel while your riding experience consisted of pedalling a bicycle), but for a salesman to even make that remark, it tells me that the dealership is out there to milk you and be damned with your safety.

    Anyway, think around $5000 for your budget. Around $1000 to $1500 for gear (how much is your body worth to you?) and the rest on a used bike that's in good condition.

    But first thing first, MSF training.
     

  3. g_man500a

    g_man500a

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    Hey there fnfalman,

    Thanks for the reply. I was beginning to wonder if I was going to get one:) I think I will definately be taking that MSF course before I get a bike. Do you think it would be okay to take it soon and then get a bike and start riding about 6 months from now? Or should I wait until it's about time for me to get a bike and then take it so that it's still fresh?

    I used to always admire the 1000+ bikes, and I still do, but after reading a lot more into it, I definatly think that I need to start on something smaller. Do sport bikes live a shorter life than cruisers? If I get one, I don't really plan on ragging on it, once I get experienced, I may take it on some curvy roads, or get up there in the speeds on some straightaways, kind of usual stuff..would a sport bike last me a little while? I read of guys talking about having gone through a dozen or so bikes, and I have to ask, why? Other than graduating to something more powerful, or totalling one out, what is the main reason that somebody switches bikes? Also, if I were to get a 650 or so..after I get my experience level up, would I still be able to enjoy the bike? In other words, would the bike be able to perform better as my skill increases?

    I have a couple general riding questions that have come to mind in the last day...first, if you are making a turn, and there's a bump in the road during the turn, will it cause you to lose traction and slide out? The reason I ask is that on one of the main roads that I want to ride on when I finally get a bike, there's this nice curve to the right but then right about 3/4 of the way through it, it turns into a bridge, and where it does there's a bump. Also, if you are on the highway, on a moderately powerful bike, and you want to pass somebody so you downshift...do you have to worry about the front wheel coming up as soon as you give it some throttle?

    I really appreciate the information, and I'll greatly appreciate any further replies. Thanks!:)
     
  4. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    I think that the sport bikes do have a shorter lifespan than the cruisers because the engines are working much harder than a typical thumper motor in a cruiser. I don't have any hard scientific numbers, but with sport bikes that are ridden hard (as in high RPM runs on a regular basis), the life span is around 50,000-miles. But a lot of sport bike riders never put that much mileage on their bikes before getting rid of them for the next greatest and latest offerings. Not only that but these bikes are very uncomfortable to ride and these people usually don't put that many mileages on them. Quite of a few hard core sport bike guys said that they rarely put more than 100-150 miles a day on those things because it's torture. These aren't fat, out-of-shape guys either but young, vivacious, healthy fellows who are serious sport bikers.

    About the only bike maker that truly offers seriously durability is BMW. Honda tourers like the Gold Wing has enjoy quite a reputation for durability as well, but it would be hard pressed to find a BMW model, lowliest to costliest, that have engines worn out. Hell, they aren't even properly broken in until around 30,000-miles.:cool:

    As far as you outriding a 600 or 650, I seriously doubt it. Most people are lucky if they can extract 50% of the bike's capability. Especially on a good standard sport bike like the Suziki SV650S, that mutha is a hell of a runner. I'm not saying that there isn't a place for a liter supersport bike, but for most owners (95%), their egos outride the bikes than their skills. Point in fact, one of my riding buddies is a female (thirty-something). She has been riding all her life on the street and she's been going to the tracks a lot (not a professional racer but just a track rider). She's giving up her liter bike for the new Honda CBR600F4i. Why? She can go faster on that smaller bike despite lesser oomph. This is from a serious sport rider and not some punk kid whose riding expertise comprise of wheelieing his Gixxer 1000 in a parking lot. There are many guys who ride Ninja 250s and embarass the same young badasses on Ducatis and CBRs in tne canyons. So, the chances of you outgrowing your street sport or supersport bike any time soon is very slim.

    As far as losing control while hitting a bump while in a turn, that won't happen unless something is mechanically wrong with the bike, or you hit that bump at that curve at too excessive of a speed. The first few times that you ride, hitting bumps at freeway speed, especially in a curve, would scare the bejesus out of you. But unless you're doing something stupid, it's just a fact of life. Motorcycle design engineers take into accounts of rough roads like that when they design their bikes for highway speeds.

    As far as unintentionally popping a wheelie while riding, it doesn't happen. Many bikes can pop a wheelie, but it's not that easy to do unless you're on a very powerful sport or standard bike. The Japanese liter bikes can pop wheelies very easy even at highway speed, but that means you have to wack the throttle open at 3-rd gear, play with the clutch and reposition your body. So, no you can't intentionally pop a wheelie unless you're stupid enough to wack the throttle open (equivalence of pedal to the metal in a car).

    I unintentionally raised the front wheel a bit, but that's a far cry from popping a wheelie. I test rode the new BMW K1200S (167-hp, 98-lbft of torque) probably a month ago now. In third gear, at highway speed, I wacked the throttle open and I can feel the front end started to rise. I didn't quite expect this to happen because the BMW is much heavier and longer (not to mention me fatter) than a typical Jap supersport liter bike. The front wheel didn't pop up but it started to rise and I felt a rush of panic coming on. I rolled off the throttle slowly and the wheel came back down. All of this happened probably in less than a second.

    A motorcycle can get up to speed for passing very fast. You don't have to do anything dumb with the gear shifting and hard on the throttle.
     
  5. g_man500a

    g_man500a

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    Thank you again for the continued information. I know a lot of my questions are stupid newbie questions, but I have to ask somewhere, and you are doing a wonderful job of answering my questions in a very detailed and polite manner.

    That sucks about the sport bikes not lasting quite as long, but that's a very understandable reason for it. Honestly and truely I just want to experience motorcycling, and any bike I think would make me happy, but I just LOVE the look of the sport bikes with all the nice fairings and all. Is there a bike that looks as nice, but is more comfortable and longer lasting? Even if I got a sport bike, I would probably not really run it hard. I'd probably ride it just about the same as if I was on any other bike, but occasionally I'm sure I would probably want to take a nice curve in a way that only they can, or speed up on an empty straightaway.

    I'd really love to be able to afford one of those BMW bikes. They seem really nice. I really doubt I'd be able to afford one though, I'm probably going to have to sell off a large portion of my limited gun collection if I even want to forsee a bike in the near future. I wish I made more money, lol.

    That's cool about the 650s being able to perform that well:) That might be just the right size for me to learn on and then continue riding for a little while(not sure if I could afford to upgrade for a little while). I just looked up a picture of the SV650S...that's a bad looking bike. As well as the V-Strom. My girlfriend just walked by and had an idea...if I were to find a good deal on a bike with full fairings, would it be considered a good idea to take them off until I feel more comfortable? Or do the bikes that are made to have fairings look like crap without them?

    Thanks for the info on the bump during a turn? I just wondered because I figured that with the bike being leaned over, that when it hit the bump it'd knock the wheels up a little bit and cause it to slide out, and with the wheelie thing, I just wasn't sure.

    About the MSF class, would it be a good idea for me to go and do it sometime here really soon, or should I wait until I'm ready to get the bike so the information will be fresh in my head?

    Thanks again for all the help..anybody else feel free to pitch in as well if you'd like:) Take care ya'll.
     
  6. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    Get the MSF training as soon as you can arrange for one that fits your schedule. Then you can get your license and go find some test rides at the local dealerships, or go and rent a bike for a weekend, or maybe hook up with a local riding chapter and maybe some kind souls would let you test ride their vehicles.

    Once you attend the MSF class and get to ride on their bikes, getting a feel for things, you may change your mind when it comes to selecting a particular type of bike, be it a cruiser, a standard, a sport, or an enduro (half street half dirt).

    Secondly, if you get a good deal on a sport bike and that's what you really want to have then go for it. Just go in with the understanding that they aren't the best choices for a beginner's first bike. Arm yourself with knowledge before you do it. Motorcycling is a fun activity and it's also an unforgiving activity. You ain't lookin' so cool when you get ran over by a car or T-bone a car and fly over the roof to do a nice Kung Fu sommersalt onto the concrete pavement.

    Taking the fairing off the bike will probably help in the initiation process if you were to drop the bike (less things to fix), but the bike does look like crap without a fairing on. Of course, you can also install frame sliders and actual frame cages in order to protect your bike as well. The frame sliders are these small stubs that affixed to each side of the bike to help mitigate the damages to the frame and the fairing. The frame cages actually are tube steel frames attached to the bike that really keeps a lot of things from touching the ground. Why aren't these cages more popular? They don't look too great on your bike, they add more width to your bike, and for the hard core riders (that few percent), they don't allow the bike to lean over as steeply as without the cages.

    Don't limit yourself to Japanese bikes. Go take a look at the Triumph dealership and see if they may have something that catches your eyes. They are pretty darn affordable and their quality had increased considerably the last few years.

    Don't worry about impressing others with your bike. Just enjoy yourself with what you have and what you can safely do. Chances are unless you have some sort of super exotic vehicle, people aren't going to be too impressed with your ride anyway.
     
  7. g_man500a

    g_man500a

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    Alright. I'll try to get into an MSF course as soon as I can. Unfortunately there is not one really close by here, so I will probably have to do a little bit of a drive and then stay a couple nights somewhere, but I don't think that will be too much of a problem. The next classes are in June and they're all booked up, so I guess I'll have to wait and sign up for the next available one after that.

    As far as the sport bike thing. It's really all about the look. A sportier mostly naken bike would be fine too. Those SV650S' are sweet looking, and so are the V-Stroms. I could work with anything really, I suppose. I have a feeling that the deciding factor is going to end up being price anyways.

    I may have to check out the triumphs. The pictures of them that I have seen look pretty nice. You say that the quality has increased in the recent years..is it comparible to the japanese bikes. The basic theme to my motorcycle endeavor is lack of money. I think I can eventually scrape the money together to get the gear I need and a safe bike to ride, but I'll need that bike to last a little while and not cost a whole lot in maintenance and parts. It'd also be great if I could find one that I can do a lot of the work on myself with the help of one of those manuals.

    I'm not too horribly worried about impressing others I suppose. I'm just the type of person that when I look at something that I have purchased, I like to feel an inner pride that it is mine, ya know what I mean? With my truck cellphone horses guns, I just like being able to really enjoy looking at what I own, which in my relatively short life, isn't a whole hell of a lot. Just wanted to say that so it doesn't seem like I'm a punk kid trying to get ahold of the coolest looking sport bike so I can wheelie it across the mall parking lot or something:)

    Anyways, I'm at work, so I should probably get to doing something work related, lol. Thanks for the continued information and take care.
     
  8. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    It sounds like a Japanese bike is in your future then.:)
     
  9. Mad Ryan

    Mad Ryan

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    While it's true that overall, sportbikes don't last as long as touring bikes, I don't think it's because of anything having to do with quality or design. I think it's rather the nature of the technology beast. Just like a Computer is old before it leaves the store shelves, a sportbike is "old" a month before the new models get to the dealer floor. Many "old" R-1's and CBR-900R's are floating around out there with 95% of their usefull life left on the motors but since they're 5 years old, they aren't worth looking at to most people.

    My last Kawasaki, a 2000 model ZRX 1100 had 36,000 miles on it when I sold it and it ran just as good as the day I bought it. My ZX-9 only has 12,000mi. on it, but it doesn't show any signs of impending mortallity. Both bikes were run pretty hard.

    Think about this. If you put 12K on your bike a year, and you assume a usefull life of 50K miles then you get about 4 years out of your sportbike. That's actually alot longer than you might think, because by then everyone is coming out super-sexy new models that you are looking at and thinking HMMMMM... Time to buy a new bike...

    I agree about starting out with the SV-650 though... Great bike!

    Also, buy good leathers, as in ones made from leather, not cordura, and wear them. Make sure they're double stitched, as in they're stitched and then the leather is folded over and stitched again.

    A good, high end helmet is a must too, not so much from a protection standpoint, as they all have to protect in order to be certified, but from a comfort standpoint. An Arai, or high end Shoei helmet will make your riding time much more enjoyable. Make sure it fits really snug at first as they break in about 10%-15%

    Last, some good Carbon fiber reinforced gloves so you don't break your hands are important.
     
  10. epsylum

    epsylum Boolit Hoze

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    The notion that sportbikes don't last very long is perpetuated by people who don't take care of thier bikes. Sportbikes (especially the supersport types like R1/6s, ZXs, and GSXRs) require more maintenece than other milder tuned bikes. Not big time maintenece, but usual things like checking the chain and tires frequently. They are more finicky when it comes to those things as they operate at a much higher sate of tune. They require a good break in, consistant oil changes (don't lollygag onthe oil changes, if you even think it needs it, do it), and other little things to insure, tip top operation.

    If all of this is taken care of and no corners are cut, I have seen an R1 with over 100k miles on the clock (it was in a magazine). The tourers are generally a little easier on the maintenence. They usually have shaft drive so that's pretty much maintenence free. Their motors a less high strung and don't operate at such high RPMs, so they are a little easier on engine components. Etc.

    Tourers are like a ford/chevy/dodge/toyota/honda whatever. They were designed to work day in and day out, but at the expense of performance.

    High end sportbikes are literally like Ferraris. They require everything be perfect to get them to keep from falling apart. Use only good oil, good gas (shell premium only for me), and keep up right on top of maintenece. But, that is price you pay for owning a vehicle that beat almost anything on 4 wheels on the street for only 10 grand.

    BTW you will love the SV.
     
  11. g_man500a

    g_man500a

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    Thanks for the information about sport bike longevity guys, I appreciate it:) Whatever bike I get, I would like to get one of those manuals and take care of what maintenance I can myself. I also have a good friend in SC who works at a bike dealership as a mechanic so I'm sure he'd be able to help if I broke something, lol.

    I have been made aware of a yamaha shop and a suzuki and honda shop here in town. I had not previously known of these two. I am going to probably go out this weekend to both of them and just sit on some of the bikes and see what feels comfortable. Hell, if the salesman is good enough and if the financing can be made right, who knows, lol. I'll let ya'll know what I discover this weekend:)

    Thanks again for everything.
     
  12. jthuang

    jthuang On The Jazz

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    First, ;F

    Second, I agree that chances are that you'll drop your bike at some point, even if your name is Nicky Hayden. But dropping a bike doesn't necessarily mean you're going fast.

    My first drop was when I was just learning and I hit a curb the wrong way trying to pull into a gas station. The "curb" was nothing more than a slightly raised lip on the ramp to get into the gas station but when you're a newbie you don't always do things the right way. ;J Anyway, over goes me and my bike, at a speed of maybe 10mph. More damage from embarassment rather than anything else.

    Yes, there are high speed dumps (and a lot are from "track" guys so it's a semi-controlled environment) but be assured, your first drop is not likely to be at 100mph.
     
  13. g_man500a

    g_man500a

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    Thanks. That makes me feel a bit better, lol. I just need to get into the MSF course and get a bike and I'll be set I think. I'm really looking forward to finally being able to get a bike and get riding. Just going out this weekend and checking out what is available at the local shops has me all geared up:) How big was the lip that you hit, and how did you hit it that it made you go over? Thanks again!
     
  14. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    I'm guessing that it's a small lip, but if you're not prepared for the impact and if the angle is wrong, you'll go down. In the MSF course, they got you riding across a 4X4 lumber piece and the proper technique for negotiating large bumps. Inattention is what gets you and not the obstacle unless it's some sort of massive boulder or thing that your bike can't scale.
     
  15. g_man500a

    g_man500a

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    I went to a few of the local bike shops this morning. The first one I went to was a Honda/Suzuki place. I found a bike I really liked there, it was a yellow SV650(I like yellow, I have a yellow sport truck as it is). Of course the salesman was like "hell, why don't you just get this 1000 here?" and I just said "I don't want to go out and kill myself". He tried to convince me again, but I told him that I wanted the 650. I talked to him for a minute and he said he could probably finance me through suzuki for $140 a month for 60 months, not the stupid credit card BS. I looked a bit more and then left and went over to a yamaha shop. They didn't have much of a selection..they only had two sport bikes, and one was a 1000, and their financing sucked. The last place I went two was this little privately owned Triumph shop that had a Katana out front. I went in and I didn't like the condition of the Katana that much, and then he took me into his little warehouse and showed me a nice SV650S(with the side fairings) that was a nice blue color and was an 02 with 7k miles on it. He said he was holding it until monday because a friend of his was trying to get a loan to get it, but after monday it would be free. He wanted right under 5k for it..does that seem like a fair price? I'm half tempted to go to my bank and see if I can work something out..but I really don't want to throw myself into a lot more debt than I am already in now.
    Should I just find a $2,000 bike and get a smaller loan..or what. Your opinions would be appreciated. Thanks guys.
     
  16. hank327

    hank327

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    I think that they are asking WAY too much for that SV650. I would get a copy of Cycle Trader and see what SV650s in your area are selling for. I wouldn't restrict myself to 600cc or smaller bikes. Larger displacement bikes have the "potential" to be trouble to a newbie rider, but the rider has total control over the throttle. If you, the rider, exercise good judgement and restraint with the throttle, then a large displacement bike will do just fine. This will allow you to consider larger standard bikes like the Kawasaki Z750, ZRX-1100, ZRX-1200, Suzuki Bandit 1200, and Yamaha FZ1.

    These "standard" bikes are excellent all round machines that you will not outgrow. Yes, the ZRXs, Bandit, and FZ1 can run like the devil, but they don't do that on their own. I returned to biking after a lay off of over 10 years. I restarted with a Kawasaki ZRX-1200 and as you can see I'm still here. Yes, my Rex can run like a scalded dog :) , but at normal speeds, she is a very tractable and docile machine. It's all in your wrist, you have the ultimate say on how your bike behaves.

    As far as Japanese sport style bikes not being durable, well that is just wrong. Again I will use the ZRX as an example as I am most familiar with it. It is not unusual at all to get 100,000 or more trouble free miles out of the ZRX's engine. Just do some reading over at www.zrxoa.org to see how reliable this bike is. I have 25,000 miles on my 2001 Rex and she runs as well as she every has. The Japanese watercooled sportbike engines are very durable as long as proper maintenance is performed, especially oil changes.

    A few years ago, a British motorbike magazine (I forget which) tore down the engine of a Honda CBR-600F4 at 25,000 miles and examined the internals to measure the wear that had occured. They found virtually no wear discernable in the engine.

    While you are over at www.zrxoa.com, check out the bikes for sale forum. You can get a Rex in great condition for less than you can that SV650. I would bet that if you looked in the FZ1 and Bandid forums you would find similar bargains. Don't discount a larger standard as they are wonderful bikes. They are kind of like firearms as you are in total control as to when they go off. Keep your finger off the trigger or easy on the throttle.
     
  17. g_man500a

    g_man500a

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    Hey hank327,

    I checked the blue book value on that SV650 after I made that post last night, and you are right. He is asking a little over $1,000 too much. I will keep my eye out for a cycle trader at one of the local stores. I haven't seen any around here, but I may have not just been looking hard enough. In the meantime, I've been checking out cycletrader.com, and there seems to be some decent deals on there. I just need to set up some kind of financing with the bank or whoever will lend it.

    I think I would be open to buying a higher displacement bike if a really good deal came along, but I would do so with a high degree of care. I am looking for a lower displacement bike that is tame enough to be a bit safer for a new rider, but still have the power to be really fun to ride in the years to come as my experience level increases. I wish I was in a situation to get a bike, and then swap it out with the next best thing whenever the time comes, but I doubt I'll have the finances to do that. It's going to be hard enough for me to get stuff together to get this first one..I'll need it to last a little while:) So yeah...I'll really take what I can get is kind of the bottom line. The higher displacement bikes seem to be a good bit more expensive as well..is this always the case?

    It's great to hear about the durability of those bikes. As I've mentioned in previous posts..whatever bike I get(unless it's a really new one..I don't like messing with new things because I'm afraid I will mess them up), I would like to tinker with it here and there when it needs work, so hopefully I can do well with it. 100,000 seems like a good number:)

    I checked out that site briefly this morning, and I am about to head back over there now to look around in more detail. It seems good so far. Thanks for the link. I didn't see the area where people were selling bikes, but I'm sure I just didn't look hard enough. I'll head over there now and see what I can find. Thanks again for the information, I appreciate it:)
     
  18. hank327

    hank327

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    I understand where you are coming from in regards to the cost of getting into this sport. That is why I suggested you consider a larger displacement bike, and just go easy on the gas until you gain some experience. If you look around, you can find some six or seven year old bikes that are not expensive, but still in great shape. The Suzuki Bandit 1200 has been around the longest and therefore you should be able to find some 1997 or 1998 models at a reasonable price. The ZRX has only been imported since 1999, but I've seen some selling for around $3,000 to $3,500.

    You may need to register on the ZRX Owners Association web site to see the ZRX Marketplace forum. It's a little over half way down the ZRXOA Message Board page. For instance there is a 2000 ZRX-1100 with 12,000 miles for sale by a member in Las Vegas, NV who is asking $3,200.
     
  19. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    I would not go back to the place where the idiot tells you to get the 1000-cc bike. It's obvious that he doesn't give a damn but to milk the most money from you. Malcolm Smith in Riverside was the same way, I came up to that place on my Beemer and ask to look at the smaller displacement bikes because my best friend's brother-in-law wanted to get into the sport. The sales guy told me to get the guy a 1000-cc (because he'll outride most anything else in 6 months - whenever you hear somebody tell you this, run away fast!!!), he then also offered to give me a test ride on the new Beemer super bike. As tempted as I was to test ride the Beemer, I told him no and walked out.

    As far as large displacement bikes go, sure, you can use one for a first bike and others have done so safely. But for every guy that's done so, there are plenty of other guys who got hurt or trash the bike. It's not just the throttle control but the weight penalty as well. Weight is not something you want to deal with when you're a down and out beginner. And even if you're careful with the throttle and not cranking it on, one wrong twist (as in learning the friction zone, start 'n stop in street traffic, etc.) is all it takes for you to bite the dust. YMMV.
     
  20. g_man500a

    g_man500a

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    hank327,
    I checked out that site it more detail. I like it a lot. I especially liked the technical part where it tells you how to do a bunch of the mechanical stuff on the bikes. I came across a Cycle Trader yesterday and picked it up. There's some pretty good deals in there on a few bikes, but whenever the price seems good..I always kind of wonder what might be wrong with the bike, you know that I mean?

    I am keeping my mind open on the displacement of whatever bike I get, whichever is most attainable I suppose, but safe for my newbie ass as well, lol.


    fnfalman,

    As much as I would prefer to stay away from a shop that is just trying to push the more expensive and dangerous bikes on me, I'm not sure if I would be able to. There is a really limited selection of bike shops around here, and out of the three that I checked, that one had the best selection and pricing by far. He was selling that brand new yellow SV650 for just over 6k. Now, that's only if I want to buy a new bike though..which I'm not sure I want to do. That shop didn't have much of a used bike selection at all, so I probalby won't have to worry about going there anyways to buy my bike. More than likely it will be a cycle trader deal whenever it comes around.

    I agree with your concerns on the dangers of a high displacement bike for a learner. Most of my bike riding experiences were straight line drags pretty much, street bikes anyways. I can ride the hell out of a dirtbike(except that X-games type stuff..my cousin does that and I never even wanted to try..scary stuff, lol), but I have a feeling that taking corners on the street with a heavier bike is a different thing, so I need to just get used to the basics of normal streetriding with something agile. I can't promise that if an excellent deal came up on a higher displacement bike(ie: a good bit cheaper than the lower displacement equivalent, or in better shape, etc) that I'd turn the deal down..but I am shopping for a 600-650 range bike, and that's what I have my heart set on. Quick question though..what do you think of 750 bikes? Just as dangerous as a liter bike, or alright to learn on?

    Also, I have heard people mention GSX-Rs and how even the 600 version isn't suitable for beginners...what makes this so? Also...they seem to be really expensive in relation to other equivalent displacement bikes, do you know why? These questions go for anybody that knows the answer of course please feel free to chime in.

    One last thing...does anybody know what bikes typically are cheaper on insurance. I was gathering random insurance quotes from the progressive website, and I was kind of suprised at how high some of the rates were for some bikes..hell even an SV650 with decent coverage was over 1,200 a year. By taking off certain coverages, I was able to get a couple bikes down to like 330 a year, but that was just for liability I think, and if I get a bank loan to get the bike, I may have to keep it fully insured. Any help you guys have to offer would be appreciated.

    Thanks again guys, take care.