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Am I ready for a dog? (Warning: long post)

Discussion in 'Woof Memorial Critter's Corner' started by Glock Bob, Mar 20, 2006.

  1. Glock Bob

    Glock Bob Snack Attack!!!

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    My fiance and I just bought our first house. I'll start moving in on Wednesday (3/22) and she'll move in after we're married in June. Anyway, one of the top reasons we chose this house was because it has a back yard that gives most others in the other neighborhoods a run for thier money (it's actually the largest in its 'hood). I'm really itching to get a dog (or two: one for me and one for her) but everyone else says we should wait a while (a few years even). I have a job where I usually work Monday through Friday, 8 am to around 2:30 pm. I would probably leave home at around 7:15 and get back at around 3:00 to 3:15. My fiance will work usually 8 to 4 or 9 to 5 (any time so long as she puts in 8 hours a day). We love to go on walks and we often take her parent's dogs with us (I tried, she doesn't want to "uproot" them). Our new neighborhood is not very busy and offers us ample room to go on long strolls (and have the dog with us). She would like something smaller, like a beagle or terrier. I like beagles but I've heard they like to dig and yap. I'd rather have a breed that doesn't tend to bark so much. I'd be happy with a miniature schnauzer as would she. I, on the other hand, would like a big manly dog. My sister's boyfriend has a huge malamute that is manly as heck, but I'm sure they are expensive and I'd be afraid they'd get to hot in our climate, as I would be with a German Shepherd. I'd also like a pitbull, but am afraid I can't dedicate the time and don't have the experience to properly raise them. I suppose I'm leaning toward a lab (chocolate or black) as we had a couple when my sister and I were young, but had to give them up as they were out-growing us. So, pet experts of Glock Talk:

    1. Would I make a good dog owner given the spare time I can give to one?

    2. What's a good breed for me?

    Thanks guys and gals.

    PS:

    [$
     
  2. Walter45Auto

    Walter45Auto

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    Well, You said pics, so here's one of my new German Shepherd Bosco, and his previous owner.
    [​IMG]

    As for your questions, I'm not sure. I would think that you'd be fine with the hours you work. I'm not sure about the breed that would be right for you though.


    ;g






    ;8 ;I
     

  3. geminicricket

    geminicricket NRA Life member

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    Your questions seem to indicate that a conversation with a local pet advocacy organization would give you the information you seek.

    Even though you have a fenced yard, adding an invisible fence will certainly be worth it if your yard dog turns out to be a digger or a jumper.
     
  4. walkin man

    walkin man

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    Well if you get a lab or a beagle you can count on either or both excavating your yard. My experience with both breeds is they are diggers and barkers. The barking can be corrected with proper discipline.

    The climate is not to hot for the german shepard as long as he has access to shade. Does your new yard have trees? If not consider some type of patio shelter.

    In my opinion, the german shepard and the doberman are 2 or the best breeds available. If they come from good stock and you can inspect the sire and dam you can make a good selection. Also don't just pick based on appearance, let the pup select you. My best dobe came from a litter of pups that I just stood in the kennel quietly and watched. He left the pups he was playing with and came over to check me out. My dog, right there.

    Good luck with the venture and let us know what you pick.
    Post pics.

    walkin man
     
  5. DEUCE-DOBE

    DEUCE-DOBE Landshark&Sis'

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    Answers... answers... and things that can't be answered...

    First, your work schedule is BETTER than most dog owners. My two Dobermans spend the day (9am-5:45pm) in the garage (blankets, toys, water, etc. provided). But, they get their morning short stroll and evening walk, plus general play time when we're home.

    So, if you have a stable relationship with the fiance' and you both like dogs, you're good to go in that regard.

    As for the breed... any puppy requires the same amount of training and socialization, regardless of the breed... its just that IF you fail to do all of this properly the negative effects only worsen with the size/strength of the dog breed. As with all dogs, this training and socialization must continue throughout their lives.

    One of the most frequent 'biters' in America is the Lab!!! Yet, everyone thinks these dogs are 'perfect', as a breed. So, while certain breeds have certain genetic behaviors (pointers point, retrievers retrieve, Dobes, GSDs and Rotts are protective), the dog is, mostly, what you make of him/her.

    I trust my 90lb male Doberman MUCH more than my mother-in-law's neighbor's shi-tzu. Seriously. Why? My dogs are socialized and trained (sure their manners aren't top notch, but they aren't psychotic).

    You'll have to do alot of research to determine what breed you want, using factors such as activity level, shedding/allergies, guarding ability, watchdog ability, etc. etc. etc.

    The thing to remember is that ANY breed requires alot of training and socialization... fail to do this and you could end up with either an ankle nipper, a paranoid mess or a large dog that wants to kill stuff. Basically, negative behavior in canines is preventable, regardless of the breed.

    I'd suggest going through the Doberman Pinscher thread in this section, because it has alot of information on training, socialization and the "pack mentality" <--- VERY important concept to grasp! The more research you do, the better off you'll be.
     
  6. Walter45Auto

    Walter45Auto

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    Just so you know, A beagle is gonna be hard to keep happy unless he has plenty of opportunities to chase rabbits. They're hunting dogs, not house dogs. Theyre happiest if they can hunt.


    ;g






    ;8 ;I
     
  7. DEUCE-DOBE

    DEUCE-DOBE Landshark&Sis'

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    Walter has a good point... relating to a breed's need for activity. Mastiffs will slouch all day... Dobes, for example, like to be on the move alot...

    One thing I'd like to point out is that if you have a beagle, a hunting dog, you don't necessarily have to be a hunter and take the dog hunting to make the dog happy. Interactive play (you running with the dog, actively participating in games, etc.) is sufficient. Its always wise to use your dog's inherent abilities to keep it happy, however. In the case of a hunting dog, take him/her to a safe, open field, and hide treats/toys for them to search for... you getting the idea?!?!
     
  8. Steve #1

    Steve #1

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    Take a look at http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/ they have graphs of how each breed falls in different categories, IE how they are with kids etc. There is also a Quiz that you can select things you are looking for in a dog and it will suggest breeds that fit what you are looking for.
     
  9. Glock_36

    Glock_36 Jason

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    Give a shelter a shot and give a second chance to a dog with a lot of love in there heart.:angel:
    Thank You and May God Bless, :angel:
    John
     
  10. tyesai

    tyesai

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    I'm no expert and I haven't stayed at a Motel 6 in awhile but here is my free advice/story.

    Your schedule is good, you should have no problem with messes or anything like that once your pup gets house broken, I have things happen and my dogs have held it for alot longer than 12 hours.

    I have had the pleasure of being the keeper of 4 dogs.

    My Rotty was a super good dog. Very protective, not fond of all people, and well behaved. She required stern discipline though, lots of training, you couldn't give her an inch, and she dug and chewed on everything until the magic age of 2.

    Lab mix. Big babie, loved to be coddled, hugged and kissed. Super good around kids, the neighbor kids in base housing would always want to come over and bring Toby out to play. He loved it. He still was protective of house and home though. Would only dig if he saw my Rottie doing it. Glad I got him from the pound.

    I found a big Pitbull while house hunting one time. He was abandoned. I took him home, super protective, very tolerant of medium sized kids, he didn't care if someone pulled his tail or bit his ears, he thought it was good fun. Well behaved unless he got out in the front yard, then he was gone, loved to fight other dogs, loved to kill cats. Keep in mind I found him and he was already about 5 years old. My buddy has a pit that likes to chase cats, but lives with a Jack Russel, they are buds. His dog is also really good around kids, but she is hard headed like my Rott. Only dangerous if you are afraid of being licked to death.

    My last and only current dog is a chow/sheppard/stuff mix. Looks alot like a Dingo, which just happens to be her nickname. She found me, was basically dumped in front of the house. Best dog I have ever owned. Was a pup when I got her, a little pup. She just seem to know to go outside to goto the bathroom. I can take her anywhere, without a leash, she would simply follow voice commands but I do leash her. It is irresponsible not to. She is people particular though and will bite your butt if you try to just walk in the house, she has hemmed up more than one of my friends coming over to hang out.

    I guess I could have skipped all this and said think about getting a mutt from the pound. Maybe one of those All American pure breeds. You know, the black dog with the white spot on its chest. You can find purebred dogs at the pound also. Someplaces will even neuter/spay them for you, although if you can afford it you should do it yourself, no reason to dip into there funds. Retired Grayhounds I have heard make good pets also, from what most people say they are big lapdogs and a little lazy, their coat is SO SOFT, I have thought about adopting one, but until I figure out if I am going over seas...........I'll shut up, THINK ABOUT ADOPTION from somwhere though PLEASE. You will get a best friend. Somedays I like my dog better than my wife. At least the dog will quit barking when I let her in the house, the wife on the other hand won't quit *****ing.

    I have known a 2 people with Beagles, like to dig, and yap, and RUN. IMHO a hunting dog.
     
  11. Rodiedog

    Rodiedog

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  12. Ender

    Ender ComfortablyNumb

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    if you are concerned with "doggie downtime," get a lazy breed or slightly older dog.

    grab up a greyhound recently retired from racing...they need about 30 mins a day of walking/exercise, and other than they they are great huge couch potatoes.

    getting a dog that is crate trained, or knowing how to crate train a dog yourself is invaluable to the nth degree.

    a young lab left alone and not properly crate trained is asking for trouble. a young German Shepherd not properlay crate trained is asking for new furniture.



    one way or another, good luck! :)
     
  13. Walter45Auto

    Walter45Auto

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    Ender's right (as much as I hate to say it!:supergrin: ). Get a retired racing greyhound. They're low excercise requirement, you may well be saving the dog's life (many of them are destroyed when they retire from racing. I don't know why, but you'd think they would be bred or something after their racing days.), and they're usually already crate trained from staying at the racetracks.


    :freak:






    :reindeer: :50cal: