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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Glock 23 I purchased right before I took the concealed carry class - I bought it based on the company's reputation, mainly. Now I'm thinking that a revolver may be a better weapon for me - seems easier to just pull gun and then pull the trigger with a revolver, versus the extra time to rack one into the chamber with the Glock (I don't ever keep one loaded in the chamber) and then fire it.

I also can't see me in a situation needing a full magazine with the Glock - six shots with the revolver should be enough.

The issue of no safety with the Glock has troubled me, too.

I'm sure the Glock is a fine weapon, and I'm not trying to start any religious wars here - just looking for help making a decision.

Thanks!
 

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What happens if your facing a gang of degenerates?
 

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So what you are saying is you don't keep one in the chamber on the Glock, yet all you have to do is pull the trigger on the revolver?

Doesn't make any sense to me?

If I am facing 3 BG's I want a full 13 rounds to make sure I am safe. Not too mention that angry pitbull coming at you that their friend just released.
 

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Pitying Fools
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Never thought I'd hear this. It sounds like you just need to become more comfortable with your current weapon. A revolver lacking a manual safety isn't much different. If you're dead set on switching to a revolver with 6 shots I think your best bet is a 38/357. I have a S&W model 66 2.5" that's what I'd consider. I can't think who else makes a 6 shot short barrel revolver. If you would consider 5 shots then there is the j-frame smith as well as the SP101 Ruger.
 

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Buy a quality holster that completely covers the trigger - keep your finger off the trigger unless you are ready to shoot - put a round in the chamber.
 

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I was nervous about it at first, but once I got my holster (CTAC, Infidel from Comp-Tac), the fears went away because there was NO WAY a round could go off unless I pulled the trigger. Finger control and a good holster is all you need.

You can take your 23, keep it empty for all I care, and walk around with it on for a few days. Pull it out at the end of the week, and I guarantee that the pistol will still be cocked, with the right holster.

If you insist on a revolver, take a look at the SP101 or an airweight model from S&W, or heck, go buy a 1911:supergrin:
 

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CCW Mom
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Get a New York trigger (11lb pull versus stock 5.5lb), carried it chambered and get a Blackhawk or Fobus (roto mold) holster so you can't squeeze the trigger until you pull the weapon.
 

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woo woo
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You have a few options;

Install a NY-2 trigger and get a 10lb pull- about the same as a typical (good)DA revolver's trigger.

Spend more time familiarizing yourself with the pistol. Practice builds confidence. Then get a proper holster and be happy. It's all about trigger discipline, really.

Get a revolver, I like the 7 shot L frame based guns like the [email protected] 386 or the older 242 that I use.
Nothing wrong with a revolver, point and shoot.
 

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I have a Glock 23 I purchased right before I took the concealed carry class - I bought it based on the company's reputation, mainly. Now I'm thinking that a revolver may be a better weapon for me - seems easier to just pull gun and then pull the trigger with a revolver, versus the extra time to rack one into the chamber with the Glock (I don't ever keep one loaded in the chamber) and then fire it.

I also can't see me in a situation needing a full magazine with the Glock - six shots with the revolver should be enough.

The issue of no safety with the Glock has troubled me, too.

I'm sure the Glock is a fine weapon, and I'm not trying to start any religious wars here - just looking for help making a decision.

Thanks!
Comfort level has a lot to do with your CCW. If you aren't comfortable, you won't carry. Having said that, the Glock is pretty safe if you follow the basic rules of safety, finger off the trigger until shooting, decent holster, more practice. I do get a kick out of all the Rambos' that think they need a G19 & three mags to go get a gallon of milk at the stop&rob. Maybe some cities are like that, then you don't go out. First rule of surviving a gunfight is don;t get into one. 99% of us will never unholster our CCW, 99.9% will never face multiple armed attackers. I would feel fine carrying a 5shot snub w/ a reload, JMO.
 

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Build the Wall
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versus the extra time to rack one into the chamber with the Glock
Why bother carrying at all?



Dude, an UNLOADED gun is nothing more than a blunt object!


Here is what you do....

Buy a revolver (KEEP YOUR 23!!!) and get used to carrying a LOADED gun for a while. After you are comfortable with the idea, you will have no problem with carrying your 23 with a round in the chamber.

TGG
 

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I have a Glock 23 I purchased right before I took the concealed carry class - I bought it based on the company's reputation, mainly. Now I'm thinking that a revolver may be a better weapon for me - seems easier to just pull gun and then pull the trigger with a revolver, versus the extra time to rack one into the chamber with the Glock (I don't ever keep one loaded in the chamber) and then fire it.

I also can't see me in a situation needing a full magazine with the Glock - six shots with the revolver should be enough.

The issue of no safety with the Glock has troubled me, too.

I'm sure the Glock is a fine weapon, and I'm not trying to start any religious wars here - just looking for help making a decision.

Thanks!
can you pls give more info on that concealed carry class that you took? :faint: refund maybe?
 

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Anyone who worries about carrying a chambered Glock probably ought not to own one. You should give your 23 to me. :D

Seriously, though, they do call it Glock Safe Action for a reason. You've got a trigger safety, a striker safety, and a drop safety. When it's chambered, the striker itself doesn't have enough stored kinetic energy to discharge the weapon even if it were able to bypass the safeties. How safe does a handgun need to be? A "cocked and locked" 1911 has a light trigger pull and large thumb and grip safeties that are fairly easily disengaged with rough handling, yet people never seem to worry about carrying them. As one firearms trainer has said, if pistols were 100% safe, they would be of no use as defensive weapons.

Carrying a Glock in a proper holster with a modicum of "trigger finger education" is as safe as carrying any other handgun.
 

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I. B. Glockin'...again. :^)
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I have a Glock 23 I purchased right before I took the concealed carry class - I bought it based on the company's reputation, mainly. Now I'm thinking that a revolver may be a better weapon for me - seems easier to just pull gun and then pull the trigger with a revolver, versus the extra time to rack one into the chamber with the Glock (I don't ever keep one loaded in the chamber) and then fire it.

I also can't see me in a situation needing a full magazine with the Glock - six shots with the revolver should be enough.

The issue of no safety with the Glock has troubled me, too.

I'm sure the Glock is a fine weapon, and I'm not trying to start any religious wars here - just looking for help making a decision.

Thanks!
Your main safety feature is your BRAIN. Read the details on the Glock internal safety system. Read them again....until you understand how they work. The simple truth is that if you don't pull the trigger on a Glock it WILL NOT FIRE. A little reading and reaserch will demonstrate to you that active manuel safetys cause about as many problem as they solve.

There are tremendous number of situations in which you may find yourself that you can not "see". Those are the ones you need most to prepare yourself for. That entails practicepracticepracticepractice, with what ever you carry. You should never carry a hand gun that you do not know inside out, upside down, backwards and forwards. You should be familiar with it's capabilities and limitations as well as your own. If you have to stop and think about any aspect of drawing and firing you may be better off NOT carrying. It isn't cool to carry a gun. It is a huge responsibility. A totally serious choice.

I feel I must support the comment above that perhaps a Glock is not the ideal carry weapon for you at this point in your experience. I also agree with the idea that you carry a revolver until you have had time to familiarize your self with the Glock and get some training and experience. Take it slow and one of these days you'll be a Glockin' with the best of 'em.:wavey:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
First off, thanks VERY much for all of the helpful comments - I really appreciate the thoughtful insights.

I've made plans to get to a range next weekend, with a friend who is very familiar with handguns, and spend some time getting much more familiar with the gun.

What's the level of effort and cost involved with changing the trigger to the "New York" trigger with the 11 pound pull?

Also, since you guys have been so much help, I have another newbie question about in-house gun safety. At my house, it's just me and the girlfriend - no young kids live here - but the grandkids (8 and 4) come over frequently. The guns are always out of sight in the bedroom, and when the grandkids come over, they're never left alone, and the guns ALWAYS go from their normal out of sight location to the back of the top shelf in my bedroom closet, with the bedroom door locked.

What should I be doing differently?

Thanks!
 

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Kopfjaeger
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Either get properly trained with the G23 so that you can carry it loaded with confidence or get rid of it. I love my G21 and have carried it on and off duty since 1998, but I have also known officers that I discovered to be carrying their duty weapon without a round in the chamber for the same reason. I immediatly had them reassigned until they received additional training and showed that they were fit for duty. An officer with an unloaded weapon is a liability, not an asset.
 

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Build the Wall
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I. B. Glockin'...again. :^)
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First off, thanks VERY much for all of the helpful comments - I really appreciate the thoughtful insights.

I've made plans to get to a range next weekend, with a friend who is very familiar with handguns, and spend some time getting much more familiar with the gun.

What's the level of effort and cost involved with changing the trigger to the "New York" trigger with the 11 pound pull?

Also, since you guys have been so much help, I have another newbie question about in-house gun safety. At my house, it's just me and the girlfriend - no young kids live here - but the grandkids (8 and 4) come over frequently. The guns are always out of sight in the bedroom, and when the grandkids come over, they're never left alone, and the guns ALWAYS go from their normal out of sight location to the back of the top shelf in my bedroom closet, with the bedroom door locked.

What should I be doing differently?

Thanks!
My situation is similar to your own. We have no children living with us any more but the grandkids are over frequently. when they are coming over everything, and I do mean EVERYTHING, even the pellet rifle, goes into the gun safe for the time they are with us.

I think you are in pretty good shape as far as that goes.
 

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Why bother carrying at all?



Dude, an UNLOADED gun is nothing more than a blunt object!


Here is what you do....

Buy a revolver (KEEP YOUR 23!!!) and get used to carrying a LOADED gun for a while. After you are comfortable with the idea, you will have no problem with carrying your 23 with a round in the chamber.

TGG
I agree. One of the short light weight Smith & Wessons in .38 special and a pocket holster will allow you to conceal a loaded weapon safely yet effectively. It's also much less obvious to a potential adversary that you are reaching for your weapon if you're just putting your hand in your pocket, as opposed to an in-the-waistband weapon, where you make yourself obvious by having to pull up your shirt and make other elaborate gestures to get to your weapon.

PillBox
 
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