Airsoft Questions

Discussion in 'General Firearms Forum' started by copperking81, Aug 25, 2019.

  1. copperking81

    copperking81

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2019
    I'm thinking about purchasing an airsoft pistol as a training aid. I know nothing about airsoft though and have some questions for those who have used them for this purpose...

    1. Can the gun be shot without the pellets without harming the gun or are the pellets absolutely necessary?

    2. Is the recoil enough such that you find real training value from the recoil?

    Over the last couple months, I've really made an effort to improve my accuracy. I dry fire near daily and also use a SIRT pistol. Both I think have helped but I still tend to shoot low. I think it's anticipation and thinking an airsoft pistol might be a good training aid to help break that habit.
     
  2. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

    Messages:
    12,012
    Likes Received:
    12,371
    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Location:
    PNW
    Yes, the gun can be shot without pellets. No, there's not enough recoil to learn anything about managing flip. The main value is in the fact that there's a disturbance at the discharge.

    In my experience, airsoft guns have pretty limited durability/reliability used this way - both overall and also in terms of the number of relatively uninterrupted discharges in a session.

    If you really want to do dry fire right, you need to learn as precisely as possible how your dry fire and your live fire relate, and exploit dry practice to master the parts that overlap - which is probably about 90% for most shooters.

    Here's an older dry/gas/live session:


    View: https://youtu.be/fsxkc0sXJmM
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2019

  3. chris1976

    chris1976

    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    42
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2019
  4. copperking81

    copperking81

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2019

    It's the disturbance at discharge I'm interested in. It's one thing dry fire can't replicate.

    I'm comfortable with my grip, sight alignment/picture, and trigger control. I really think I'm dropping the muzzle ever so slightly in anticipation and no matter how hard I try, I can't seem to break the habit. My groups are tight, they're just always low. I don't even feel like I'm doing it but considering I shoot low with different ammo, pistols, etc... that has to be it.

    I can only get to the range once per week at max so I'm looking for any alternative training options I can work on in my free time at home. Airsoft seemed like it might work but I'm open to any suggestions.
     
  5. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

    Messages:
    12,012
    Likes Received:
    12,371
    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Location:
    PNW
    Just speaking from my own personal experience, I don't think the disturbance will be great enough. What would work a lot better would be to load centerfire down to whatever your ideal point is, then work up from there.

    Coaching would probably help too.
     
    copperking81 likes this.
  6. copperking81

    copperking81

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2019
    Yeah, I think a coach is probably the next step.
     
  7. Mike-M

    Mike-M

    Messages:
    5,738
    Likes Received:
    6,468
    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2012
    Lawdog3 likes this.
  8. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

    Messages:
    12,012
    Likes Received:
    12,371
    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Location:
    PNW
    Shooting is a physical, mechanical act.

    In order to call hits, it's imperative to learn to shoot with your eyes fully open and no interruption in your visual awareness throughout the firing process. But you don't shoot the gun with your eyes.

    The vast majority of people who shoot pistols have breaks in their awareness and also compensatory, nervous reactions to the discharge. When they shoot, some of their mechanics are beyond their conscious control and also beyond their awareness. They see the sights before and after, but not during discharge. So that's the limit of their ability to call hits.

    Learning to call hits is a great way to get your foot in the door, because you can start to see your mechanical errors in the present tense, as they occur. Alternating back and forth between dry and live fire (on consecutive sessions and also within 1 session) can really help reinforce this.

    Strong vision skills are a powerful tool, but they will not directly stop you from smearing the sights off target. If you need a physical anchor to help with that, consider trigger press. Let your visual awareness become passive, so it's in the background, and bring your tactile awareness of trigger press to the foreground.

    Focus all your attention on pressing the trigger back in a manner that will not disturb the sights - including during the discharge. Use your mechanical skills to create a situation that allows the sights to lift from POA without any influence from anything other than the discharge itself.

    We are all wired to react to stuff blowing up in our faces. Learning to not do this is a very important specific skill to shooting well. It's not a peripheral thing - it needs to be sought out and practiced as a primary skill. Different people have different temperaments, but no one becomes an accomplished shooter without seriously confronting this issue.
     
    gamecocks likes this.