Airsickness

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Lior, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. Lior

    Lior GUNS=FREEDOM

    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    90
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2004
    Location:
    Israel
    Today I took an introductory flight with an instructor on an Italian ultralight, a Jet Fox, which is a neat kind of plane.

    It was a great flight and I felt fine most of the time, save a bit of nausea following a couple of steep 45+ degree turns that I wasn't expecting, which left my stomach behind.

    How long does it take for a trainee pilot to overcome airsickness of this nature?
     
  2. Andrew Tacquard

    Andrew Tacquard

    Messages:
    473
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2000
    Location:
    S. MD
    some people never. little planes (single engine piston) still make my stomach feel weird. probably because they get blown around so much. most pilots that I know who have gotten sick were over it in a flight or two.
     

  3. GotGlock1917

    GotGlock1917 Lifetime Member

    Messages:
    6,713
    Likes Received:
    5
    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2004
    Location:
    Central Arkansas
    I have always believed that was the key to it. When you are in control you expect most motions. I have never gotten air sick while I was flying. I don't do so well as a passenger.
     
  4. Junkyard Dawg

    Junkyard Dawg

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2001
    Location:
    B.C., Canada
    Introductory flights should never have bank angles over 30 degrees, the object is to sell you on the decision to get your license not make you nausious. Everyone should get a version of the Granny ride to start with. You should get out of the airplane laughing/smiling ear to ear and wanting to get back at 'er tomorrow, otherwise I haven't done my job.

    You're not paying big bucks to see how good I am at the controls, but to see how enjoyable this experience is, and the ease at which you can master it. Sadly many schools have instructors whose primary interest is in accumulating hours logged, so as to move on up within the industry.
     
  5. Andrew Tacquard

    Andrew Tacquard

    Messages:
    473
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2000
    Location:
    S. MD
    yeah, I forgot being at the controls will probably fix it for you. the only time I've gotten close to getting sick (knock on wood) was with someone else at the controls unloading the airplane. was the instuctor unloading in the turns?
     
  6. F14Scott

    F14Scott Luggage CLM

    Messages:
    4,920
    Likes Received:
    2,080
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2001
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    I puked every single flight for the first forty or so hops in Navy flight school, all my flights in T-34s and about half of the T-39s. Carried zip lock bags, got it over quickly, and stowed the bags in my pockets. If the instructors reported it, I would have been sent to "spin and puke" training and, if I didn't get better, ultimately DQed. Either they didn't know, or thought my performance and attitude in the aircraft were good enough to let my short bouts of airsickness slide until I got over it myself.

    Once I got to T-2s, I stopped feeling sick, both in that jet and, later, in the Tomcat. As long as I was flying regularly, I never felt even a hint of queasiness in a jet with a canopy. If I were to take a month off, my first hop back might cause me to break a sweat, but that was it.

    However, once, in the middle of a cruise where I was flying tactical hops every day (and living on a boat sloshing around in heavy seas 24/7), I got a "good deal" ride in an E-2C Hawkeye to see how the other half lived. Sitting sideways in the darkened back brought back all the old feelings of nausea; only my fear of the ribbing I'd get for barfing in the tube kept my lunch down. It was miserable.

    So, I think resistance to airsickness is a combination (in order) of:
    a) innate fortitude
    b) ability to see the horizon
    c) conditioning to motion
    d) ownership of the flight controls
     
  7. 10mmAuto

    10mmAuto Guest

    Messages:
    137
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2007
    I think that alcohol plays a good sedative for me. When I'm going on a long flight, I get heavily drunk and I don't worry about getting sick.....from flying anyways........... :tongueout:

    (Disclaimer: This was a joke, don't get anal with me about it.)
     
  8. JAREDG21

    JAREDG21

    Messages:
    165
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2004
    Location:
    Coastal NC
    don't know how long it will take you to get over it but ginger is a great treatment for seasickness. try it sometime.
     
  9. New

    New Guest

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    :thumbsup:


    It bothers me every time I hear of a yahoo CFI doing such things on a discovery flight. The school I used to instruct at, if you pulled maneuvers to upset or give a nasty image of GA to a student, you get canned, no if ands or buts.
     
  10. Lior

    Lior GUNS=FREEDOM

    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    90
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2004
    Location:
    Israel
    Since posting on this thread, I have started my flight training. Today we did deep turns and a spiral dive. The spiral dive caused me quite a lot of nausea. I was very happy to reach terra firma thereafter, although I felt okay doing medium and deep turns.
     
  11. k9medic

    k9medic

    Messages:
    1,830
    Likes Received:
    736
    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2000
    Location:
    at an LZ near you
    I always told students that the best technique was the one that was never noticed.

    If I can fly an entire shift, and the crew didn't even realize I was working my ass off then I did my job.

    Anyone can yank and bank.
     
  12. HollowHead

    HollowHead Firm member

    Messages:
    29,362
    Likes Received:
    13,047
    Joined:
    May 16, 2005
    Location:
    Where the buffalo roam
    On the weekend of the fourth I went up with a customer who's a pilot for a company that owns a bunch of Pilatus aircraft. He needed to "charge the batteries" on a PC-7 and took me along. It was great and it was I who asked for the "non-granny" special. He asked before each maneouver and we did them all at about 7K ft. I always loved roller-coasters as a kid but this flight almost put my lunch through my nostrils. The second I called it we were straight and steady. That's a pro.
    P.S. I got about half-hour stick time, also. Man, is that one heavy. HH
     
  13. HollowHead

    HollowHead Firm member

    Messages:
    29,362
    Likes Received:
    13,047
    Joined:
    May 16, 2005
    Location:
    Where the buffalo roam
    Which adds to my life's two hundred and forty minutes of total time. Man, I can't believe you guys get paid to do this! HH
     
  14. jacquejet

    jacquejet

    Messages:
    451
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2004
    Location:
    Chapel Hill, NC
    There was nothing like a T-37 "spin ride" to bring up breakfast. Three or four "high left or high right" entries was more than enough to make one's day. The best ride though was when I got to fly with the wing's "spin pilot," our local spin expert. I didn't know the "tweet" would spin so many different ways!
     
  15. JellyBelly

    JellyBelly Meat Popsicle

    Messages:
    1,098
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2005
    Location:
    Estados Unidos
    Roller coasters never came close to making me lose my lunch no matter what I ate or how close to boarding the coaster I ate. If I had my was as a kid I would've eaten on the ride.

    I would LOVE to see a pilot try to make me lose my lunch. Even if I do, I still get a kick-ass ride out of it! :thumbsup:
     
  16. New

    New Guest

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    I will be to-the-point. YOU NEED TO GET YOURSELF A QUIALITY FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR, who knows what he/she is doing, preferably before you or your CFI gets you killed.

    I would recommend that you take some time and talk to a few CFI's that are seasoned and professional. Unless you are in an aerobatic aeroplane, you should not be doing a spiral dive. I wish I could slap sense into all CFI's who do such things, especially with a pre-solo student.
     
  17. Lior

    Lior GUNS=FREEDOM

    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    90
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2004
    Location:
    Israel
    Spiral dives and steep turns are part of the syllabus. You have to know how to recognize them and extricate yourself from them, at least in an ultralight.
     
  18. New

    New Guest

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006

    A spiral dive in an UL, no thanks. An incipient dive, yeah I can see. Part of what syllabus? There is no syllabus here in the US for UL. They operate under FAR 103, basically very few regulations, mainly meant to keep them from getting in the way, and a mentality of if you can build it, you can fly it, just don't carry more than 5 gallons of fuel and be under 254 pounds (I think). But I guess thats why they have a parachute attached to them.

    I am just say for anyone who is going to fly anything, you need to get a firm understanding of how things fly, proceed with caution, and do your homework. Basically read and get many different opinions from qualified people. Not just a yahoo selling UL's or the local UL flight instructor:upeyes:.
     
  19. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

    Messages:
    4,413
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2004
    Location:
    Mucus City, USA
    The funny thing is that “having the stomach” for airplanes doesn’t guarantee you won’t get sick in ‘copters. And vice-versa.
     
  20. Lior

    Lior GUNS=FREEDOM

    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    90
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2004
    Location:
    Israel
    I am now six hours into the syllabus, and doing landings and decent traffic patterns. Despite a steady regimen of stalls and deep turns, I think I have the matter of nausea cured. The more I fly, the more I feel that the plane is an extension of my body. It's nice becoming more confident.

    PS my instructor has been a pilot for more than 40 years, and has flown more combat missions than most of us have driven. He's pretty good.