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aftermarket aluminum frames for glocks

11686 Views 20 Replies 15 Participants Last post by  sciolist
Has anyone tried a aluminum frame for their glock?
If so what did you think?
thanks for the input
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i dont like the "feel" of aluminum framed guns. polymer is fine, steel is fine. something just seems off with the aluminum ones.

not terribly on topic though. so no i have not tried one, im game though, may be different.
 

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I haven't heard anything about the aluminum/steel frames for Glocks for years. Is that company still in business?
If you're referring to the CCF Raceframes, no, they're out of bidness. I have a stainless version but unfortunately the rear portion of the locking block broke. That part is a permanent installation with no replacement possible. It'll probably still work but I'm not taking any chances. I think the recoil impulse was such that the stiffness of the steel frame didn't allow for any flexing when the slide returned to battery. (for those in the know, yes, I'm aware of the differences in the locking block on the CCF vs the Glock. Per CCF's instructions, I was using the factory barrel, not an aftermarket) It was a joy to shoot and extremely accurate but it didn't last very long. I think Robar had some of their left over inventory a while back but most is probably all gone now.
 

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What is the purpose. If you have a purpose for a metal frame Glock, then explain.

I think Glock has proven, without question, that a polymer framed firearm is easy and cheap to produce, and actually lasts as long as the owner has interest in it, and also just as long as the metal framed firearms do.
 

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I am curious as to what advantage comes with an aluminium or steel frame Glock.
 

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What is the purpose. If you have a purpose for a metal frame Glock, then explain.

I think Glock has proven, without question, that a polymer framed firearm is easy and cheap to produce, and actually lasts as long as the owner has interest in it, and also just as long as the metal framed firearms do.
The purpose, of course, is to make money in the pistol aftermarket parts arena. :supergrin: Beyond that, the stated advantages of a metal frame are: increased frame rigidity, thereby enhancing accuracy (aluminum/steel), recoil control due to increased weight (steel) allowing for quicker follow-up shots. Personally, with the CCF steel frame, I didn't notice an increase in my accuracy nor were my split times between shots decreased significantly, if at all. I did notice a significant difference in the feel of the trigger when making deliberately aimed, precision shots. Except for the frame, I was using the stock Glock parts. The trigger pull was much smoother and the shot break felt much cleaner. I can only attribute the nicer feel of the trigger to the rigidity of the frame allowing less "slop" in the interactions between the trigger bar/disconnector/striker.
Since retiring the CCF frame, if I want to shoot a steel-framed handgun I'll pull out my Sig Scorpion Carry or S&W 686. If I want an aluminum framed gun I'll take along my Sig 226. But mostly, I'll take along my black/fde/od "Tupperware" 19, 17, 34, or 41. Or 30S. Or 26. Or . . .
 

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I'm sure that the difference can be measured on some scales, but unless you have the talent to appreciate these subtle changes, your really are just wasting your money, and time. Additionally, what you think has occurred may not be born out by measurements.

Unfortunately the PLACEBO effect of spending $200-300 extra on a Glock frame is hard to separate out. "Accuracy" "trigger feel" "recoil" are the most abused terms in the handgun owner's lingo, and is heavily contaminated by subjectivity.

Anecdotal experience on a gun forum is about as reliable as eyewitness accounts during a trial-- fraught with inaccuracy.

Buyer beware.





The purpose, of course, is to make money in the pistol aftermarket parts arena. :supergrin: Beyond that, the stated advantages of a metal frame are: increased frame rigidity, thereby enhancing accuracy (aluminum/steel), recoil control due to increased weight (steel) allowing for quicker follow-up shots. Personally, with the CCF steel frame, I didn't notice an increase in my accuracy nor were my split times between shots decreased significantly, if at all. I did notice a significant difference in the feel of the trigger when making deliberately aimed, precision shots. Except for the frame, I was using the stock Glock parts. The trigger pull was much smoother and the shot break felt much cleaner. I can only attribute the nicer feel of the trigger to the rigidity of the frame allowing less "slop" in the interactions between the trigger bar/disconnector/striker.
Since retiring the CCF frame, if I want to shoot a steel-framed handgun I'll pull out my Sig Scorpion Carry or S&W 686. If I want an aluminum framed gun I'll take along my Sig 226. But mostly, I'll take along my black/fde/od "Tupperware" 19, 17, 34, or 41. Or 30S. Or 26. Or . . .
 
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