close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

adjusting laser with front sights on Glock

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by kcolg30, Dec 23, 2006.

  1. kcolg30

    kcolg30 Gaston's Child

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2006
    Location:
    Florida
    Folks,

    I have a rail mounted laser that is perfectly aliginged with my front sights when pointing at an object from a distance of ~20 feet. The problem is when I point a something that is at 50 feet with the front sight the laser does not line up. I guess my questions is you can only sight a laser at one particular distance??

    Thanks,
     
  2. danielsand

    danielsand NRA Life Member

    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2006
    Location:
    in the desert
    You are talking about elevation here.
    Even open sights are not "dead on" at every distance. The change of distance has to be corrected by adjusting elevation on every weapon known to mankind (from bows and slingshots to naval and coastal artilery!) . Glocks are no exception.

    So,.....to answer your question, yes. The laser sight will be "dead on" with POI at any distance you choose (within reason!), and ONLY at that distance! If you put the target closer or farther from this "sighted distance", you will see that the impact on target deviates from the laser dot (POA). Generaly the lasers are adjusted for elevation to be dead on at the weapons optimal (most practiced) distance.

    In a real life it will not matter whether the POI will be half inch higher or lower of the POA if a BG is few yards further or closer!
    Now if the laser is on the longer range weapon (e.g. a rifle!), you will have to play with latteral sight adjustment (called vindage). This "latteral deviation" from POA is caused by several factors,....trajectory, balistics, air temperature, barometric pressure, wind etc.
    Fortunately handguns do not get affected noticeably by all this, due to their short range.

    Get some good books on balistics and/or sniping and learn more if you are interested in this subject. But let me warn you,......once you get into all this, there is no stopping midway! Balistics are very interesting subject and a whole new ballgame from plinking at the range.
     

  3. jmoore

    jmoore

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2001
    Location:
    champaign, IL
    I assume that your designator dot is high at 50?

    Recall that with a laser mounted below the barrel, you will only be able to have the laser path and the iron sights align at one distance. An option is to align the laser path so that it is parallel to the sight line with the iron sights. It will always designate a point that is 2" lower than the line of sight for the irons - but it will do so consistently at all useable distances. You will, of course, have to deal with the non-linear bullet trajectory.

    Good luck, and don't trust the lasers any farther than you can throw em:)
     
  4. kcolg30

    kcolg30 Gaston's Child

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2006
    Location:
    Florida
    Thanks to both of you....You guys answered my question. Basically I aligned the sights to be at a resonable distantce like 20 feet since it will be a HD weapon. As for accuracy the best training is at the ranged using the iron sigts, but it is also nice to have the red dot as a back up.

    THANKS AGAIN
     
  5. BamaTrooper

    BamaTrooper Retired

    Messages:
    9,863
    Likes Received:
    309
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2006
    I am not a mathmetician, but I think the further the laser is moutned from the bore, the more "off" it will be at distances the further they are from the POI due to the angle of the lasers inclination. Kind of like two lines making an X. (Yes I know the bullet is arcing while the laser stays straight; it was a simplified description.)