Adding Gas Line... $$$?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by PennsWoods, Jan 20, 2020.

  1. PennsWoods

    PennsWoods

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    I currently have gas lines in the house for the dryer, water heater, and furnace, but no luck for the stove which is currently electric. The goal is to get a gas stove for the wife. Got a quote to run maybe 8 feet of gas from the existing black iron pipe in the basement to the stove. $1,078.

    Now that I've picked my jaw up off the floor and kindly ushered the guy out, anyone have any experience with this or whether this is just the price of business? Seemed steep, but I've never had gas work done before.
     
  2. PennsWoods

    PennsWoods

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    The stove would be17k btu, the basement is unfinished, so the pipes are exposed, it would just need to tap off the black iron pipe, run about 8 feet of line along the basement ceiling, and up through the floor to the oven. I'm hearing that the black iron pipe is a pain to work with and thread and all that, so maybe that's the reason for the cost.
     

  3. Finestkind

    Finestkind

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    When we built it was $3k from the handoff point at the street and to the locations in the house. That was 12 years ago so other then that I cannot help.


    Finestkind
     
  4. Hoochrunners

    Hoochrunners

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    That is an I don’t want to do it quote. Keep shopping. Material is negligible + $100/hr labor. You should be in the $300 range.
     
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  5. eagleno49

    eagleno49

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    It depends. If you can cut the pipe and add a tee and a union, it would be a fairly easy project. Some local codes do not allow for a union to be used on gas pipe. This would require disassembly, which may be extensive. I would certainly get a second quote.
     
  6. FullClip

    FullClip Native Mainiac CLM

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    Not sure about where you live, but here you can do the work yourself. I added a propane line to my kitchen range when I changed from electric to propane. Have to use flared copper here and then the gas company does a pressure test. I squeezed mine up to 100 pounds with the air compressor and checked ever joint with soapy water and all was good. Gas company only pressed it up to 15 psi for theirs.
    On a side note, about a month after they did my inspection and told me about the dangers of DIY stuff, one of the gas companies ace inspectors had his garage blow up....due to a gas line he ran to a new heater....I laughed and laughed and laughed.
     
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  7. briarpatch

    briarpatch

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    To me it is simple. I have done it many times. You can get every length of threaded pipe you need at Lowes or HD and the fittings if needed along with pipe dope for the threads.
    You can also get flexible gas lines and valves for shut off.
    That would be at most, less than an hour to do.
    By your explanation.
     
  8. briarpatch

    briarpatch

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    The people I dont want doing anything in my home is a contractor and them being checked by an inspector. It is getting worse all the time.
     
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  9. Batesmotel

    Batesmotel

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    The disassembly/reassembly is a pain in the butt and probably the majority of the cost. I ran lines for a stove, heater in my office and a line to the deck for a bbq myself when I bought the house. Lots of neighbors have converted the stove to gas also and paid a lot to have it done. If you can’t do it yourself they know they have you over a barrel.
     
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  10. ARP

    ARP

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    You need to find someone who is retired from the NG company that does this type of work in their retirement. Most likely they can use flex pipe. That is my plan to do at my house. My kitchen once upon a time had gas to the kitchen. It was shut off and the pipe cut. Crazy enough, they ran the pipe into the kitchen thru a cold air return and then up thru the floor, YIKES! I plan to do mostly flex pipe with proper shut offs. I know a guy.....
     
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  11. DrewBone

    DrewBone

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    If the use of a 3 piece coupling (aka "union") is verbotten, it would be easy enough to add a T fitting/shutoff valve/vertical run of piping in place of a coupling in the middle of a run, or to the termination end of the piping, i.e., at the end of the run where a flexible gas line connects the gas service to a gas drier; the end of the T is used to attach the shutoff valve/flex hose to the drier, and the vertical connection gets an appropriate gas service shut off valve and the appropriately sized black pipe up through the ceiling to the kitchen using as few connections as possible.

    As a sidenote, not just any old pipe dope should be used on gas service threaded pipe connections; there's a specific gas service thread sealant that must be used to satisfy building code - and to protect your arse. It's usually light blue in color.
     
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  12. DannyB

    DannyB

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    There are some variables to the job. Like mentioned above, whether a particular type of joint or union is legal there is one.

    Here are some things that may affect the cost. First, like said above, he may not want to do it. That calls for other bids. 2nd, he may have to get a permit that has a fee. 3rd, with a firm bid he has some risks as to what can go wrong. I'm told that the cast iron joints and elbows are now from China and not very good, and may crack when tightened. He could have it all undone, redone, and have a tiny leak on a joint or union.

    That is one of those jobs that I could probably do on my home if I wanted to. But I know what it entails and it is a PIA. It is the kind of job that is easy for some and not so easy for others. And lastly, your life may depend on it being right.
     
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  13. greg vanstralen

    greg vanstralen

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    We remodeled the kitchen about 10 years ago. They wanted $5K to install a gas line for a gas stove and fireplace. With insert, it was closer to $10K. We already have a gas heater in the basement WITH A "T" directly below the stove and the fireplace is directly behind the stove (Other side of wall).
     
  14. LostinTexas

    LostinTexas Exploring Alternate Routes

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    If possible stick to the black iron for service. Too many things can happen in plumbing to go flex, no matter how "scream of the world it is" and you don't want gas leaking.
    Black iron isn't difficult, finding a competent plumber is.
    That price sounds really steep. It was pretty inexpensive to have it run when we built.
     
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  15. flyover

    flyover

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    Dad had to replace the line to the furnace and the guy used some kind of a flexible coated line, plastic or vinyl some such over aluminum or stainless steel. I don't think it was over 400 bucks.
     
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  16. DannyB

    DannyB

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    That is CSST, Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing. Most plumbers are using that these days. That may be possible for the OP as well.
     
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  17. AZ Husker

    AZ Husker

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    There was a plumber at my house doing some other work and I asked about running an iron gas line from my furnace, across my attic, and down to a new cook top in the kitchen. He did it as a side job on the weekend. Three hours, $250, and I paid for the materials.
     
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  18. napp32

    napp32

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    I had the same thing you described done a few years (maybe 5) ago. The length of the new run was about thirty feet from where he tied into the furnace supply line to the kitchen installation. My guy used black pipe; and the job took about two hours. He charged me $300. My house is on a crawl space. He said it would have been less if my house was on a basement.
     
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  19. Lucnik

    Lucnik

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    Tracpipe is the easiest way. Lowe’s, Home Depot or Amazon.
     
  20. PhotoFeller

    PhotoFeller A swamp dude

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    The quote of $1,078 is way too high!!