?? about learning to fly

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by GlocknSpiehl, Oct 17, 2004.

  1. GlocknSpiehl

    GlocknSpiehl NRA Life Member

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    For all you private pilots (or is that general aviation?): have seen some of the planes at my local airport and they look tiny. I am 5'11" and weigh (currently) about 350lbs. I am losing weight like crazy, but am interested in taking flight lessons now.

    How hard would it be to wedge someone like me in the cockpit? Would I fit? I am pear shaped, not barrel chested. Should I wait until I lose another 100lbs? I know that I could go now and take a demo flight from the schools, but do not want to humiliate myself by being told I am too big. ;1

    Comments? Advice? I can take being told to wait until I lose the 100lbs, but no fat jokes, please...
     
  2. CFII

    CFII

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    I am 6'5" tall, and weigh about 275-280. I push the CG of most aircraft, if I fly with a decent sized student. However, it can be done. Find a local school with an Archer, or a C172. If you can afford it, train in a C182. Do some weight and balance caluclations with an instructor, and see what happens. If you drop to 300 it will be easier, but try now. Good luck. Dont let anyone tell you that you are too big. There is always a way. You might just have to fly with some ballast in the baggage comparment.
     

  3. Wulfenite

    Wulfenite The King

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    I met a guy in ground school class who's in your ball park. He and his son were learning to fly. They bought an old Skylane (Cessna 182) and were using an independant instructor.

    Probably a pretty economical way to go. By training together they got some secondary learning just by being in the plane while the other guy was flying and getting instructon, the back seater was balast, and it shouldent be hard to find an instructor that will work for a few bucks less an hour than you would be charged at an FBO.

    Think you can talk your SO into a payment on a 182. ;)
     
  4. Medpilot 2

    Medpilot 2 Smkumifyagotum

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    A C182 was what I was going to say also but there are some considerations with that. A C182 will run you about 30-50% more money depending on the FBO. Also another thing you may want to consider is the insurance requirements on a 182 will be higher (more flight experience needed), so you may not be able to solo in it.

    When I was flight instructing a few years back, I had a student who was close to the 300 pound mark. The weight and CG was not as much of an issue as was the space issue. We were in a C172 and part of his *** was on my seat. I'm about 180lbs and 5'8" with somewhat broad shoulders. After my door popped open on takeoff and me almost falling out I told him that we would have to switch to the 182 or he would have to get a smaller instructor .
     
  5. Texas T

    Texas T TX expatriate CLM

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    Hijack... nice avatar Medpilot 2 ;P ;f
     
  6. Medpilot 2

    Medpilot 2 Smkumifyagotum

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  7. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    It's like ...a sandstorm over the ocean, right? ;g
     
  8. HKMark23

    HKMark23 Millennium Member

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    Actually its a climbing right turn departing ORD (4L) on a typical summer day.
     
  9. Medpilot 2

    Medpilot 2 Smkumifyagotum

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    Well actually,

    It's not an attitude I'd want flying my 421, it's a pig of an airplane you know.

    The attitude indicator is showing the aircraft inverted with the nose about 3 degrees below the horizon at ORL on a typical summer day. :cool:
     
  10. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    So if you were executing the localizer back course and found yourself in that attitude while on the outbound leg, would the needle be directional or non? :joker:
     
  11. Medpilot 2

    Medpilot 2 Smkumifyagotum

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    I'd say pilot finding themselves in that unusual on a LOC BC has no right to be in a cockpit and will probably not get the chance to repeat that mistake ever again.;g


    Now to answer the question about tracking. Depends on your nav equipment, but if you are just using a standard VOR then it would be directional of course.:)

    Can this thread get anymore hi-jacked? ;a
     
  12. Douglas in CT

    Douglas in CT Millennium Member

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    What does your CT Permit say?
    As you are losing weight (a good thing), may I suggest the following plan of action?

    COSTS:
    1) FIND OUT THE CURRENT COSTS PER HOUR FOR FLYING:
    - Instructor cost per hour
    - Aircraft rental per hour

    PLAN your BUDGET based on 65 hours to get your license.
    - Yes, I know it can be done in less, but average seems to be around 65 hours.
    - Look at 40 hours of Instructor + Airplane
    - Look at 25 hours solo flight (Airplane only)
    - DO THE MATH
    - Start a separate SAVINGS ACCOUNT to pay for this Flight Training.

    2) WAIT until you hit 250 lbs.

    3) In the mean time READ EVERYTHING on aviation. Books, magazines, etc. Attend Safety Seminars locally.

    4) When you hit 250 lbs. (I estimate by Nov. 2005):
    Take 5 hours of flight time in the Skylane immediately before winter hits.
    - This will give you some perspective/familiarity and an initial feel for what is going on.

    5) Stop Flying... until Spring.

    6) Take a multi-week (10-14) ground school over the winter.

    7) Pass the written exam

    8) Resume flying in the late Spring (May 2006)
    - By this time (May 2006) your weight should be way down below 250 and you'll be ready, eager, and physically up to attacking Flight Training.
    - You should be able to fit comfortably into a Cessna 172 at this time (@ a lower per hour cost).

    9) Plan to schedule 4 flight lessons each week with your instructor.
    - This allows for 1 rain cancellation each week.
    - Anything less WILL make the training take longer and be more expensive.

    10) Take the Flight Test and Get Private Pilot License.

    Good Luck, Mr.Phelps. ^c^c