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A New Method for Disassembly

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by northstar19, Aug 22, 2013.

  1. northstar19

    northstar19

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    I was recently shown a new way to take down my Glock 17, and it makes the process even easier. My question today: Is there any danger to the firearm, using this method?

    Here it is. As usual, draw the slide back a notch. Grip the takedown lever. THEN pull the trigger.

    It works like a dream.

    -- But what do you think? Is it safe for the firearm?

    Note. If you try this method at home, be advised: the slide comes off very freely, even by its own weight, while both hands are otherwise occupied. Therefore, I suggest you carefully hold the gun level, until you are ready to remove the slide.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2013
  2. Mark Housel

    Mark Housel

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    I have always done it this way? So far, so good. ;-)
     

  3. gooffeyguy

    gooffeyguy

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    If you have a NY1 or NY2 trigger spring installed you have to do it this way
     
  4. northstar19

    northstar19

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    Thanks for your replies. I just called the Glock company, to make sure, and their representative told me that the alternate takedown method is perfectly acceptable.
     
  5. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Moderator

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    I'd say you probably touched on the major concern; that is, dropping the slide. Durable as it is, if the slide gets away from the handler and falls on something like a concrete floor, there is a real danger that the tab w/hole at the front where the recoil spring assembly rides can be bent and/or cracked, or the slide rails near the rear of the slide might be bent/crimped closed, preventing reassembly or causing other problems. I've seen photos of both kinds of damage, so it does happen.
     
  6. cciman

    cciman

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    What does this save you? About 1 sec, or 1 extra step? Whoopee!!!

    Taking that intervening step to insure there is no chambered round, BEFORE pulling the trigger....Priceless.
     
  7. johme

    johme

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    Both ways are fine, it's your slide and be safe.
     
  8. garya1961

    garya1961

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    What?
     
  9. northstar19

    northstar19

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    Try both methods. See which one you prefer. Many say the alternative method is easier. As for the safety check? It goes without saying.
     
  10. NYresq

    NYresq

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    Uhm, no...
     
  11. cciman

    cciman

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    Taking something so simple and adding complexity (holding the gun level or the slide might hit the floor, and/or not checking for the empty chamber, and both hands occupied): I am still not sure what it saves you in time or effort.