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A Message To New GSSF Shooters

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by DannyR, Jun 19, 2002.

  1. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

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    Folks,

    There are a lot of accessories available today, but the bottom line is that you cannot buy accuracy. Nothing takes the place of hard practice with a purpose. I recently reviewied all match results since March 2000. In the hands of a Master class Shooter, a stock G17 shoots as well as a tricked out race Glock with all the goodies. A composite of the best stages ever shot with a stock Glock provides a score of 36.99. A composite of the best stages ever shot with an Unlimited Glock provides a score of 36.12. Folks that's only 0.87 points difference! That's theoretical of course.

    In actual individual scoring, Tom Costanza presently holds both the Stockmeister record score of 45.61 AND the Unlimited record score of 40.19. Now that's only an actual difference of 5.42 points. Tom used the finest fitted barrel, scope mount red dot scope, etc., on his unlimited pistol, and adjustable Bo-Mar sights on his otherwise stock G17. In Unlimited, even the smallest improvement counts. However, if you are not in Unlimited, feel confident that your Glock is capable of near-Unlimited performance. The secret is practice with a purpose. Don't noise it around.;)
     
  2. RenegadeGlocker

    RenegadeGlocker

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    Funny you should bring this up, because I was looking into this too. I noticed that the UNL shooter scores were not much better than the stock scores, thus reaching the same conclusion you did - It is not the gun, but the shooter.
     

  3. Custom Glock Racing

    Custom Glock Racing I did it first. Millennium Member

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    On the other hand none of the Top stockmiester scores were shot with a truely stock gun as far as I know. All a tricked out "stock" gun and custom loaded ammo. While practice is a major part of winning, quality components and equipment plays a part as well.

    matt
     
  4. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

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    Matt,

    The point I am trying to make is that folks don't need titanium strikers, metal guide rods, aftermarket springs, L.S. triggers and plungers or aftermarket barrels to make their Glocks more accurate.:(

    Tom's G17 always passed a detail inspection by Chris or Scott.

    Shooters need practice to make themselves more accurate.

    A factory 3.5# connector, proper polishing and good ammo are a given factor in obtaining maximum performance from a stock Glock.
     
  5. Don At PC

    Don At PC Senior Member Millennium Member

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    Danny;
    You are absolutely correct. Not trying to hurt anyones business but there is "NO" substitue for practice. A new Glock right out of the box is capable of better accuracy than most shooters. The 3.5# connector with polished inerds and a comfortable set of sights can enhance the performance for some shooters however without practice nothing else matters.
     
  6. don't tread on me

    don't tread on me

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    Good points, and if I may add another! If you want to do well in competition, go to as many matches as possible. Practice IS important, but competing often wll accelerate your improvement!!!
     
  7. Fireglock

    Fireglock Which is worse?

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  8. LoveGlocks

    LoveGlocks

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    I agree with all of the above postings....

    Improvement comes from one's ability to react/change what one does when one is shooting a Glock through FEEDBACK and MEASUREMENT. Both feedback and measurement(s) from your practice sessions as well as feedback and measurements during matches. It's not just practice but the right way to practice and analyze your measurements so that you know your current limitations.

    If you can hit 9-inch papper plates at 5 yards consistently, then you don't need to practice as much at 5 yds... move your targets out to 10 yds, and so on until you hit the 25-yd distance.

    If you can't consistently hit 9-inch paper plates at 5 yards, then you must review your fundamentals (stance, grip, trigger pull, sight alignment, etc.) AND your equipment (your Glock, ammo, etc.) to determine what it is that's impeding you from achieving this mini-goal. It could be several factors combined. Have an experienced shooter look at your fundamentals if you feel you need help analyzing your performance.

    Once you reach a mini-goal, set up for the next higher mini-goal... soon, you will be able to know your limitations at the present time and when you step up to the line at a match, you can have high confidence on the part of the COF that you know you excel in and focus your concentration on the part of the COF that you are currently struggling to get control of!

    It's like riding a motorcycle... acquiring a high skill level of shifting, clutching, braking, leaning, etc. so that when you are going at high-speeds, you can be focused on the road and scanning the geometry of what's ahead instead of diminishing this focus on the actions that could/should be autonomous.

    If you acquire the high skill level of proper trigger squeeze (pulling the trigger without affecting the sight alignment), proper grip, proper stance, trigger reset, etc. then more of your focus can be concentrated towards the less 'automonous' actions needed to fire a Glock accurately... i.e., focus on the front sight (proper sight alignment), recoil management, next target acquisition, etc.

    If you think about it... a GSSF match can be broken down into two 9-inch paper plate targets at any of the following distances... 5, 10, 11, 15, 20 and 25 yards. If you set up a minimum of two paper plates (three or more would be ideal) in any combination of these distances and can consistently hit them, you will be able to do well in the GSSF match!

    Regards,
    Frank
     
  9. TJC

    TJC "No Compromise" Millennium Member

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    PRACTICE and dedication!

    I don't know about anyone else's Stockmeister gun, but except for the Bomars, mine is ALL stock.
    I don't consider polishing connectors etc not stock. Especially since it is allowed and available to all shooters in all classes. They are still stock Glock parts, right down to and including the trigger springs etc. I wonder if everyone can say that?

    The same holds true for ammo. Everyone has the same option of shooting factory or reloads.
    In fact, when we proposed the Stockmeister Class to Mr. Edwards at Fulton, NY a couple of years ago, one of the suggestions was to REQUIRE factory ammo for that class. That was obviously not put into the class when it was formed.