A few photos from Peru

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by jtmac, Oct 5, 2010.

  1. jtmac

    jtmac Señor Member

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    I've been traveling to Peru off and on since 2006, and this year I've been there in June and spent the entire month of September. In times past, I've either lacked a decent camera or never had good pictures of scenery.

    I still didn't have a decent camera with me in September, but I *did* have an iPhone 4. And then I figured I'd go ahead and upload a few photos taken with my old iPhone 3G. I am... not proud of these shots. These are just a few things I manage to snap quickly along the way. They are also unprocessed, as I'm so swamped that if I sat down to work with them this post would not happen.

    July:

    Wooden bus in Iquitos
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    A picture of a longboat in Iquitos adjacent to our own, with a scenic garbage-strewn mud bank used as a dock.
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    Dinner sitting in the boat.
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    Just another boat picture for perspective, taken at rest stop.
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    The village we stayed at.
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    And back in Lima, we managed to get a tour of the presidential palace. This doesn't really happen any more for anyone but schools and special guests. I'm not sure how we got in. The entirety of the inside of the palace is works of art. Every piece of furniture, every archway, every floor is a genuine work of art. Unfortunately, my phone camera doesn't do any of it justice. We happened to be there for the changing of the guards, which I've always been badgered into trying to capture from the other side of iron bars despite my protests that these things don't photograph well through iron bars. I FINALLY get a chance to see inside this amazing, art-filled palace and see the changing of the guard up close, and all I have is a stinking. phone. camera. They left the DSLR behind because they like their tiny, portable cameras. Nevermind that it's always been my job to carry around and use the camera. ARG. I want to cry just thinking about it.

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    (more posting follows)
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2011
  2. deputy tom

    deputy tom Gringo Viejo

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    Great pictures.Thanks for sharing.tom.:cool:
     

  3. jtmac

    jtmac Señor Member

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    Gosh those uniforms are silly looking. I understand they do this every day. I don't know why.
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    Although my phone camera could do no justice to the amazing art that is the construction on the inside, I will share a photo of one of their gorgeous crystal chandeliers... because of the, uh, amazing lighting technology.
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    (Next are photos from September.)
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2010
  4. jtmac

    jtmac Señor Member

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    Pacasmayo
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    In Lima, most cabs are 90s tin-can models. In Pacasmayo, it's just whatever you can get. None exploded. (And yeah, that bag flew off at the first intersection.)
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    Adobe brick construction is common. $80 per thousand, plus $60 to lay that thousand. What you see here is about 10,000 bricks... mostly laid by one guy. Dirt and sand for mortar is free (but water to mix them is not). When they lack scaffolding, they just shovel sand to stand on. These buildings can actually be finished quite nicely. The more refined ones can be finished to quite high quality. I'd have no qualms about making my own home out of this stuff, as long as it was done properly.
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    I helped out one morning. It is darned neat to build a permanent structure out of dirt. Need a differently sized brick? Just slice it to size with your machete.

    A bit more of Pacasmayo, near the beach. My better shots have feature people, so they aren't included.
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    Last edited: Oct 5, 2010
  5. RichJ

    RichJ

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    Dang. Who'd you piss off to get sent there? Looks schi-tay.

    Did you have to pay a lot of money for this trip?
     
  6. jtmac

    jtmac Señor Member

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    More of Pacasmayo, on the beach. The colorful fishing boats laying beside each other look quite interesting in person.
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    Mmm, ceviche. Fish cooked not with fire, but with lime. It is delicious.
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  7. RichJ

    RichJ

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    Where are all the people? That place looks deserted. You'd think there would be at least three or four people on the beach. Right?
     
  8. jtmac

    jtmac Señor Member

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    Now we go up into the highlands to Cajamarca, a ten hour bus ride up twisty mountain roads.
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    Burros spotted along the way.
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    Some photos near the square in Cajamarca.
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  9. jtmac

    jtmac Señor Member

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    We stayed in bungalows in the "Baths of the Inca" (the closest we came to being tourists). Careful, the volcano heats that up to about 160 degrees according to your silly Fahrenheit system.
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    Those who can't afford adobe bricks go even cheaper and just use straight dirt. Which can be finished out remarkably well.
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    Stove and faucet at the restaurant where we had our last breakfast in Cajamarca. It was functional, but our food was actually cooked inside.
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    Our meals were served by local families. They serve an INSANE amount of food. I stuff myself on one serving, only to find out that there were two more courses coming. Two hours after we finish eating, it's time for the next meal. "They show their love with food," I heard, over and over. Don't turn down anything, since you don't want to insult someone's heartfelt gift of food.

    Here's the main course at one meal. Can you guess what it is?
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    If you guessed "guinea pig", you're right! It is like pork-flavored rubber.

    That's all I have. One of these days I will take a real camera and schedule time for photos instead of hastily snapping whatever I can get. One of these days...
     
  10. jtmac

    jtmac Señor Member

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    Ha, believe it or not, I enjoy it. There's a lot of work to be done there. I wish I could do more.

    Plane tickets are a little over $800, round trip. I could live modestly for a month for $250 staying at a hostal, and many locals live on a lot less. $500 a month would be quite a comfortable hostal-residing lifestyle. I pay a lot more, though, because of the constant travel that not only costs money, but prevents us from seeking out the best deals.

    It's not quite the season on the southern hemisphere yet. They're just exiting their winter. In their summer, it's packed.
     
  11. pack-indy

    pack-indy Emissary

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    I spent a few weeks in Peru...loved it. Your pictures brought back some good memories, and some not so good smells :wow: I hiked up the Inca Trail to some little ruin they have up there :supergrin:
     
  12. Nestor

    Nestor Lean & Mean

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    Cool looking soldiers and interesting food :)
    Thanks for posting!
     
  13. javi

    javi

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    I spent the first 19 years of my life in Lima.... I miss the food the most..... The changing of the presidential guard is really cool :supergrin:
     
  14. ExxoticOne

    ExxoticOne

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    Ceviche? Baby that's all you had to say! I'm not too keen on the Guinea Pig but I'd try it.

    Nice pics, thank you for sharing. :wavey:
     
  15. Reagan40

    Reagan40

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    Cool pics. I spent a few days in Iquitos. I flew into the airport. It looked like the typical airport that the A-Team would fly into. At the end of the runway there was a small airplane grave yard. There were rusted out planes, some tilting to one side due to the loss of one of the landing gear.

    While I was there, I had dinner at a restaurant that was made of bamboo and floating out in the middle of the Amazon river. I was told it was the "gourmet" restaurant of Iquitos. The scenery was cool. A parrot flew onto the half wall next to us. My travel companion asked the owner of the restaurant if that was her pet parrot. The owner looked puzzled, then replied "uh, no. We are in the Amazon. That is a bird.":rofl:
     
  16. pack-indy

    pack-indy Emissary

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    As an outsider, the food can look pretty sketchy depending on where you are. I remember the open air fish markets and trying not to gag from the smell. We went fishing on the Amazon for piranha...ate some that night. Pulling the hook out of their mouth was an experience :wow: I also remember Inca Cola, thats some good stuff.