A deck using deck blocks.

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Nemesis., Jun 16, 2020.

  1. Nemesis.

    Nemesis.

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    Everything I read insists concrete piers below the frost line otherwise, frost heaves will damage the deck?

    But then I see people advocating deck blocks. How does that not allow frost heave's damage, etc?

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  2. Ross-in-Pa

    Ross-in-Pa Western Pa

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    Some people advocate using these as a "floating" decking alternative.

    The structure floats on the piers, and allows for movement with the changing seasons.

    Concrete below frost line is still the best way.
     
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  3. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

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    Another factor is the extent to which the deck can tolerate differential vertical movement. For example, is it rigidly attached to a structure that's founded below frost line?
     
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  4. Geeorge

    Geeorge Sarcasm Inc.

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  5. Hoochrunners

    Hoochrunners

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    Use HandiPiers. You pound the rods in. They are solid. Cousin has used them for a room addition. I’m using them for a deck. They meet code.
    1FF2EDC8-15DD-4D69-8448-EE3C9DCF5828.jpeg 418114EE-2B09-4AED-8E99-B67E5B637FFC.jpeg
    D93EA8E6-B15D-45B2-BCDF-F8D5372E5052.jpeg
     
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  6. Flying-Dutchman

    Flying-Dutchman

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    Do it right. Make it sturdy.

    Secure the pressure treated wood in the ground with a little poured concrete. Probably cost the same in materials or less but with more labor. Worth it in the long run.
     
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  7. Dave514

    Dave514

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    :cow:
     
  8. Geeorge

    Geeorge Sarcasm Inc.

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    safe_image.gif
     
  9. Dave514

    Dave514

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  10. AK_Stick

    AK_Stick AAAMAD

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    Nothing in the ground to cause a heave.
     
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  11. FullClip

    FullClip Native Mainiac CLM

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    I was constantly playing with my deck every spring for years trying to keep it somewhat level until i pulled the old concrete posts (only a couple feet deep) and then bit the bullet and dug down 4 feet. Took a while but eventually got there. I wrapped the sonatubes in a few layers of heavy duty poly, set them, and while starting to pour the concrete lifted them up a bit and pushed back down to get a "footing". Posts are attached to metal standoffs imbedded in the concrete. Added a 4" thick styrofoam skirt around the post that sicks out about a foot and buried about 6" deep. Now over 10 years later, nothing has moved. Depth, slippery surface and insulation help keep the frost from grabbing the post and the insulation on top helps to keep the frost from forming. Nobody hates digging post holes more than me.

    There is a radio show up here called "Hot and Cold" hosted by a "handyman" and used to have an engineering professor until he passed away. They did a lot of stuff about how frost moves things around.
     
  12. treg

    treg

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    Mines been setting on precast pole barn pole pads for 21 years.

    No problems yet.
     
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  13. RenoF250

    RenoF250

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    It really depends on how much your soil moves. Some areas it does not move at all some it moves inches. As was said, if it is freestanding and built to tolerate movement the blocks are fine if not, get digging.
     
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  14. pittpa

    pittpa What did I come in here for?

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    You just reminded me of the video I saw of a guy sitting in a lawn chair drilling a post hole using a drill with a long bit and a shop vac. Never stood up out of the chair. Just drill, vac, drill, vac.
     
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  15. ScubaSteve

    ScubaSteve

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    Don't know where you're posting from..

    but around here.. (about 43 degrees N.. 25 miles or so to the atlantic.. southern maine)


    Dig sir, dig.

    It's no fun, but a few hours now can save you a lot of annoyance later.
     
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  16. ScubaSteve

    ScubaSteve

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    thats actually brilliant.. gotta remember that
     
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  17. FullClip

    FullClip Native Mainiac CLM

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    I wish I was that easy. Used the two handled post hole digger where you jam, pound and twist all to pull up a couple tablespoons of dirt. Used a broken hoe to help fish out the softball sized rocks. It was slow going, but I was up and down a lot, sticking my arm down in the hole to dig out rocks.

    I hate digging...especially around here. Even the power company can have a heck of time when setting a new pole...and they got nice equipment.
     
  18. Gonzoso

    Gonzoso

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    Yeah you gotta dig. Here in the poconos it's 3-4 feet to get below the frost line.

    It's rocky as heck here so every hole is an exercise in mental and physical endurance with a rock bar and a post hole digger and being up to your armpits in dirt fishing out rocks.

    You can use a power auger but it needs to be mounted on a skid steer or bigger machine and ideally have carbide or diamond cutters on the tip. Those little two man augers are a joke up here.

    That weird octopus looking footer someone posted here would also never work in my area. You'd hit a rock and bend the bar in short order.
     
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  19. Desert Kraut

    Desert Kraut

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    What works best all depends on the type of soil you have in your area. Check with some contractors to see what they say. Usually, the best option is to dig, as others have stated before me.
     
  20. Flags

    Flags

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    I used them for a low freestanding deck in Fl. No frost line lol. Been about 15 yrs and no issues.
    I do not think I would use them North of S Carolina
     
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