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A Blown up glock 23

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by theguyfrommich, Oct 30, 2004.

  1. theguyfrommich

    theguyfrommich

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    I will not bore you with all the details but I have a glock 23 that I blew up with reloads, I had a squib round and then fired another round right behind it. the kkm barrel split in two pieces, the top part of the slide is pealed back, the metal nubs on the frame where the upper rides on are gone, very bottom of trigger broke. It is a serial no. AVUxxx. Qeastion is I know glock won't replace it because of running reloads but if I send it to them will they sell me a reconditioned or older model for lesser price than a brand new one?

    Also want to say no I don't reload anymore, I have all my fingers, the only damage was to my pride, I was reloading on a fairly new dillon square deal B (not that I,m blaming it on it) I had been relaoding with a Lee turret press for about a year and thought I was ready to do things a little faster, well lets just say If I ever get back in to it I will go back to a turret press or a single stage.
     
  2. ponykilr

    ponykilr Off The Porch

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    reloads for a specific purpose like varmint shooting, target shooting or the like are ok because you will take your time and do it correctly. loading just a bunch of plinking ammo will make you want to hurry and eventually, a mistake will happen. .40 plinking ammo is cheap compared to a messed up gun. i am glad your fingers are intact. now where's my box of wally world white box..........
     

  3. ColdMan

    ColdMan Science Nerd

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    Best advise would be to send the parts as is to Glock and ask for a replacement cost. Send the original barrel in too. Actually you should probably call them first.

    If they are nice they might just replace the parts at a low cost of about 300 bucks or so. Maybe less. Hard to say.

    Sorry to hear about your bad luck with that. Also, when shooting any firearm slow down and check your firearm if you have and odd report or "weird" recoil. If you are shooting faster than you can notice this, you might consider slowing down a little, no insults intended.

    Ponykilr,

    The amount of money I save on reloading plinking ammo is over the cost of a brand new glock, sig, HK, or super custom .45 each year. For some of us, the fun of reloading and the money we save is much greater than the risk of a messed up gun. Obviously you shoot less than many folk that reload, or else you would realize that plinking ammo is about twice as much as what I reload very high grade .40 ammo for. I've had more bad factory rounds than I've had bad reloads.
     
  4. cheygriz

    cheygriz Venerable Elder

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    Sorry to hear of your problem. It's only natural to blame the reload and be a little chary of reloading.

    However, I have had numerous squibs with factory ammo. If I had fired a round after the squib, I would have had the same result you had.

    I load on a Dillon 650, and I've never had a problem. Never had a problem on the old Dillon 450 either. The way to prevent another occurence is to learn to "feel" every shot before firing the next one. Because you're just as likely to get a squib from a box of factory ammo as you are from a box of reloads.
     
  5. get2now

    get2now Yowsa!!!

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    I hope you are okay.
    Now what you should do is call Glock to see what they recommend.
    As far as reloading, there are many things you have to watch for when you reload to produce good quality ammo but this problem is more because of your own shooting habits.
    A basic rule is "If it goes pop! you stop!".
    I've had many squibs back when I used to load with a Lee Pro 1000 but it could have been prevented just by me watching to make sure all the stations were working as intended.
    When my wife started using the Dillon 450 we had squibs then too. That was because she forgot to push the charge lever on the downstroke.
    I'd have to say in the last 15 years since I've been loading on progressive loaders that I've had probably close to 20 squibs. None of which had consequences such as yours. That's because of the above stated rule.
    When I upgraded my loaders to Dillon 1050's I added a light and mirror so that I can visually confirm there is powder in every round. I've never had a squib since I started using the 1050's but I can still confirm that they all have powder.
    Don't give up on reloading yet, just be more careful.
    Good luck
     
  6. glockendoc

    glockendoc

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    I'm kind of new at this game. If badguy shoots at me, I don't want to be thinking of waiting for my round to make sure it didn't pop.
    So, you guys must be talking fun, nonintentional, nonpractical, plinking.
    My training seems more along the rapid-accurate-stop-this-POS-before-I-die practice practice practice type.
     
  7. theguyfrommich

    theguyfrommich

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    Let me see if I can answer your question first of all you
    (glockendoc)said
    I learned a lot from reloading from the basics of what powder to use to what primer and what bullet to use. I did not have some one to show me so I did a lot of reading and then more reading and did I mention more reading. Once I felt comfortable I started reloading.No I was not going to use them for carry loads but, I knew If I was going to carry a weapon for protection not only did I need to recieve the trainging but need to know what it was capable of, and how it fucntioned in every way. One of the ways I felt I could do two things was get more practice and do it for a cheaper price, was to reload. In the year that I reloaded I shot close to 10,000 rounds, I did get plenty practice and I did save a lot of money even with blowing up one glock 23! one thing I did learn through this was to not only watch your shots but also listen to every noise your weapon makes. Its not about how many shots you can rack off into a target but, where you put them bullets, how your weapon acted before, during and after each shot. Ok enough rattling one thing I will say I bought another glock 23 one week after I blew up the last one, and sold my reloading equipment and buy manufactured rounds from different places for fairly cheap. I still shoot a lot and pay attention and listen to what some people say and let what other people say go in one ear and out the other, and always looking for new traings to go threw for selfdefense.
     
  8. glockendoc

    glockendoc

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    You sir, are a scholar and a gentleman. I very much appreciate your thoughtful comments, as I will take them to heart and practice.
     
  9. get2now

    get2now Yowsa!!!

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    You have a point if you’re in a gunfight, but I was guessing he wasn't in one. That said, if you're practicing and your weapon doesn't fire as intended, since it was just practice you should be paying attention to all aspects, including the sounds or lack thereof. You wouldn't necessarily have to wait for it to go off either. These aren't flintlocks with a delayed ignition, when you press the trigger it either goes bang or it doesn't.
    And, yes I was talking fun, but I don't think in the same sense your thinking. In the kind of gun games I compete in it's all timed so the person with the best score in the least amount of time wins. As a range officer who not only competes but also oversees other competitors during courses of fire, I'm there to insure everyone's safety, including the competitor. If during a course the competitor’s gun went pop, and they didn't hear it (which does happen sometimes) I'm there to stop them. That way you don't have a kaboom!
    Now granted, if you were being shot at you probably wouldn’t even hear your return shots but you’d know if your weapon fired or not. Squibs don’t usually work the action enough to chamber another round (in autoloaders) so you would have to perform some kind of corrective action to resume. I hope you’re also practicing failure drills too in your practice sessions.
    Anyway, I just think you should pay attention to all the details during your practice, but then that’s my opinion.
    Good luck.

    And as a side note, I wouldn't have sold my reloading equipment. That's like saying if you're involved in a car accident you won't drive again. By all means, if you don't want to go progressive then go back to the single stage or the turret press, just don't quit reloading.
     
  10. glockendoc

    glockendoc

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    thanks for extra thoughts get2 --
    practicing failures is ultra important and will not be neglected! thank you, sir.
     
  11. jasonfriesen

    jasonfriesen

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    I wouldn't take it too hard because I suspect you will never make that mistake again and you weren't hurt. If you reload for long enough you will get a squib load. I have had two in the last 15 years. Both of them were from reloaded ammunition although I have personally seen a squib load from Winchester White box ammunition (see below). I suspect mine were from the reloading maching not being set up 100% correctly and/or my own mistake somehow.

    Do not assume that factory ammuntion will be never have squib loads or rounds with very low powder charges. This stuff is made with quantity in mind not quality. Although a squib through a pistol is not as problematic as a squib through a revolver. With a revolver you don't have the additional hint of the slide not cycling. This should be a big HINT that something is wrong and not to fire again.

    ANYTIME your pistol makes any kind of different sounding noise you should immediately suspect that you may have a squib load. A "pop", "hollow crack" or anything along those lines should be suspected of being a squib load. The slide will very likely NOT cycle with a pistol.

    ANYTIME you hear a pop, crack or unusal sound when shooting immediately stop, unload and check your barrel for obstructions. I knew instantly I had squib loads because of the hollow pop noise, the lack of recoil and the slide not cycling. I then quickly knocked out the bullet from my barrel and the barrel was not damaged.

    I was with a friend who was shooting a .40 Beretta and he got a squib and he did not recognize what had happened. He cleared the malfunction and fired another shot. The Beretta essentially exploded and he was not injured. Another squib load was discovered in the same case of ammunition.

    Essentially I'm telling you that you don't need to stop reloading and that regardless of what ammunition you use you MUST remain aware that you could get a squib load.


    ;b
     
  12. cole

    cole Millennium Member

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    Ditto this thought. In about 9,000-10,000 rounds you can/could save enough to buy a used gun to replace it (depending upon if you buy in volume, what caliber you reload and/or component choices).

    I reload personally for a .357 mag on a single stage and shoot mostly reputable reloads through our G17 (at $70/1000). Nary a real problem in 4000+ rounds of 9mm, other than one bad primer and one poorly culled round).
     
  13. Neal

    Neal Millennium Member

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    I'm sure I read the FBI fired a .40 caliber Glock intentionally with a bullet stuck in the bore, and the gun did not blow up. This was reported at the same time they did their 120,00 round test using 6 Glocks with zero malfuntions. This makes me wonder if their test was "slanted".
     
  14. MBR

    MBR

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    I would just go out and buy a new 23. I would not bother Glock with it. I wouldnt want any of the old guns parts used in a new weapon.
     
  15. Steve Koski

    Steve Koski Got Insurance? Millennium Member

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    Wrong, wrong, and wrong again.

    Reloads for any purpose are great, I've saved enough to buy a box of Glocks. I've never "hurried up and caused a mistake" in 35,000 rounds.
     
  16. Austin Charles

    Austin Charles Hi Jack!!!

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    I seen a Sig. have a KBoom on a box of Winchester white box.

    It can happen with any ammo.
     
  17. amd65

    amd65

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    I once witnessed a squib in a 357mag revolver with factory ammo. the round pushed the bullet halfway into the forcing cone locking up the cylinder tight. failure drill? back up gun or run. the shooter had just boasted that "revolvers dont jam". I replied by rapid firing 13 rounds thru my browning hi power. there is karma.
     
  18. thejackbull45

    thejackbull45

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    How did the slide cycle with a squib load?