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9mm Bullet Diameter .355 or .356 ? Help!

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by FyreCalG17, Aug 20, 2011.

  1. FyreCalG17

    FyreCalG17 Gen4 Fondler

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    Ok, let me start by saying that I'm new to reloading.

    I was searching online for bullets and I kept running across different bullet diameters for 9mm.
    Rainier - .355
    Montana Gold - .355 & .356
    Berry's - .356

    So I'm wondering, what is the ACTUAL bore diameter of a stock Glock 9mm barrel since it has the polygonal rifling instead of grooves?

    Will the Berry's bullets with the larger diameter require more powder to push them at the same velocity as other plated bullets such as Rainier?
     
  2. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123 Grumpy Old Guy Silver Member

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    My first thought is to try different diameters to see which ones work best in your firearm. Due to many things some may like .355 while others will work better with .356.
    As for powder charge the it should not be much different since the diameter of the bullet (for caliber) is not as important as weight of bullet.
    Remember to always start near medium and work from there in reloading.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2011

  3. FyreCalG17

    FyreCalG17 Gen4 Fondler

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    But both diameters SHOULD fit through my barrel?
     
  4. ron59

    ron59 Bustin Caps

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    jacketed are usually. 355
    lead is. 356

    guess plated is closer to lead?
     
  5. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123 Grumpy Old Guy Silver Member

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    Both diameters should fit, jacketed will be the smaller (usually) .355 and plated may be either while lead can be .356 or .357 in diameter. Some firearms like different sizes so shooting a few thru yours will tell you which is more accurate.
     
  6. dkf

    dkf

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    You can shoot either .355" or .356" bullets thru your Glock. Some jacketed bullets (like the Hornady HAP bullets) are .356" diameter also.
     
  7. polizei1

    polizei1 It WAS Quack

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    I've been using Precision Delta bullets, they are .355".
     
  8. Meathead9

    Meathead9

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    Here's something else to add to the confusion.

    The 9x25 Dillon is a 10mm cartridge necked down to 9mm. I load 9x25 Dillon with .355's, while another GT member uses .356's, and another GT member uses .357's. We've all had success with our handloads, so I'm not sure what's right. I called LWD to ask, and it didn't really seem like they knew for sure. I was told that it "should be" .355, but the only way to know for sure, is to "slug" MY barrel. Each barrel is slightly different, so one may be better suited for .355, and the other for .356.


    To answer your questions directly, the Berrys bullets are Plated, and behave much like lead. The data between lead and plated bullets is supposed to be interchangeable, as well as the diameter. Lead and plated bullets are much softer than jacketed, so they are usually .001-.002 overbore. Basically .356 Lead/Plated = .355 FMJ/JHP.

    Also, I went to Montana Gold's website and I couldn't find any .356 bullets. I know Zero makes .356's, but they are mainly used for .38 Super.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2011
  9. G19 DB

    G19 DB

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    I have used both and cannot tell the difference in my G19
     
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  10. Steve Koski

    Steve Koski Got Insurance? Millennium Member

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    It doesn't matter.
     
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  11. Ferdinandd

    Ferdinandd

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    With jacketed slugs, I don't think that .001 will make a difference. Lead bullets, on the other hand need to be be sized to .001 for best performance and to avoid excessive barrel leading.
     
  12. Steve Koski

    Steve Koski Got Insurance? Millennium Member

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    A .001 lead bullet would have an outstanding sectional density.
     
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  13. Ferdinandd

    Ferdinandd

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    Steve, Thank you for pointing out my poorly worded explanation of what I was attempting to convey to the OP. To clarify, .355 to .356 variation on jacketed bullet diameter seems not to affect performance, in my experience. That small difference does seem to matter when using unjacketed projectiles, based on my experience casting and loading for 9mm and .357 Mag.
     
  14. HAMMERHEAD

    HAMMERHEAD

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    Both diameters perform equally for me in a wide variety of 9mms as far a accuracy and speed over the chronograph.
    Some good .356" bullets for Glocks are Berry's new 124 grain thick plated, hollow base flat point (HBFP-TP), the Hornady 125 grain HAP and the Rainier 130 grain .38 Super bullet.
    I load them all to the same data (data for a 124 grain .355" jacketed hollow point).
     
  15. argy1182

    argy1182

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    You can fire either one and be fine. Typically, the softer materials are .356 and the harder materials .355. Both will work fine for anything you're going to do with a Glock barrel.
     
  16. FyreCalG17

    FyreCalG17 Gen4 Fondler

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    Thanks guys for the advice. I guess lead bullets are larger because they are softer and will conform to the barrel's grooves while jacketed bullets are harder and won't conform as much. Correct?

    Anyway, I've been loading Rainier and I'm about to try Berry's. I'm not quite ready to switch to the good stuff yet because as of now I'm just loading to have fun at the range. When I get serious about target loads then I'll start looking for more precision bullets. This should get me started in IDPA as long as I exceed the power floor.

    Thanks again for the input
     
  17. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123 Grumpy Old Guy Silver Member

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    One of the best bullets I shoot for accuracy in either 40 S&W or 10mm is a 175gr LSWC from SnS Casting. Very accurate to around 25 yards but I have to watch the velocity to keep them from leading, beats any jacketed, plated or othe type lead bullets I have used so far.
    Lead sometimes can be very accurate bullets in most firearms.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2011
  18. fredj338

    fredj338

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    As you are saying, a MINIMUM of 0.001" larger than groove dia for lead bullets. Many 9mm guys are shooting 0.357" or even 0.358" lead bullets. SInce the Berry's & Ranier are soft lead w/ thin plating, they tend to work better slightly over sized like a lead bullet. I always go 0.356" for plated & pretty much lead too.
    TO prvent leading in the bbl, the bullet needs to seal off the bore form hot gas trying to escape around it, so a slightly larger bullet does this better than a smaller bullet. It's not that the lead is softer but more malleable. A hard cast lead bullet is quite a bit "harder" than a soft swaged plated bullet like Berry's or Ranier.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2011
  19. FyreCalG17

    FyreCalG17 Gen4 Fondler

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    I wouldn't mind trying hard cast bullets, but none of the indoor ranges I plan to shoot IDPA allows lead. The outdoor ranges don't care one way or another, but using lead would limit my options.

    I guess everyone is afraid of the whole lead vapor - brain damage thing. Go figure
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
  20. fredj338

    fredj338

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    It's just about all I shoot in IDPA is lead, but always outdoors. If shooting indoors, I would go plated ot jacketed. The lead vapor thing is bogus. Lead does NOT vaporize off the bullets being fired, but there are small particulates that "break off" as the bullet leaves the muzzle. That & the lead in the priming compounds of most commercial primers. Add poor range ventilation & you do have an issue. One reason I shun indoor ranges as much as possible, limiting my indoor shooting to 3-4 X a year. I cast & shoot lead bullets almost exclusively, my lead levels are well below nromal. Wash your hands & face after shooting, don't smoke while shooting, avoid indoor ranges, lead bullets are fine.:dunno: