757 birdstrike on video

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by jacquejet, May 14, 2007.

  1. jacquejet

    jacquejet

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    I don't know how long ago this happened or if it has been around very long but the link was Drudge's website today.
    It is a video of a 757 taking a bird (or 2) on t/o in the right engine. Pretty cool. The total video is pretty long but the first minute or so is the cool part.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KhZwsYtNDE
     
  2. dozing4dollars

    dozing4dollars Plasticized ! CLM

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    The Thomson crew did a great job of recovering the crippled jet!

    If I was ever gonna have an engine failure due to birdstrike, I would want to be in a 757-200. It has amazing performance-even single engine!

    I was flying a 757 as an FO nearly twenty years ago and ingested a bird(s) on takeoff-the engine "banged" for about one cycle and pressed on as normal. No apparent EPR/EGT flux, no vibration, etc.

    Next to a fast mover with afterburner, the B757-200 is the closest thing to a rocketship that I have flown. It also stops like a banshee. Full Power takeoffs out of northern airports on a blistering cold winter morning were nothing short of amazing.

    The best part- it was made by Boeing!:thumbsup:
     

  3. 10mmAuto

    10mmAuto Guest

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    Have you seen the engines on a triple-7? They are super powerful and I hear they can take off on full fuel and cargo on one engine with ease.
     
  4. IslandHopper

    IslandHopper Guest

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    Every airliner out there can take off at max weight on one engine... it's a requirement of certification.
    Well, perhaps I should say every airliner that has been certified in the U.S. (which would cover all Boeing and Airbus aircraft.) ... as I'm not really familiar with the rule-set that the Russians build under :)
     
  5. jacquejet

    jacquejet

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    Not quite.

    Refering to transport aircraft, each operator can decide how much gross weight performance he wants to buy for his type A/C (ie; 757, A330, etc.) For example, Northwest operated their 757's at one GW since they purchased the first one in around 1985. This year they decided to operate them to Europe, and to do so, required purchasing from Boeing a higher certificated GW (the max that Boeing had the 757 certified to). Also, the max GW is based on the structural limits on the airframe: taxi loads, take-off loads, and the max weight the aircraft can expected to land at, which is not the same as max landing weight. Every aircraft can land at the max certified t/o gw. However, doing so requires an inspection of the landing gear and probably other structural items and can be quite lengthly depending on how firm the landing was and if any damage is noted on the initial inspection.

    What you are refering to (I think) is an engine failure at V1 and continuing the t/o or stopping in the remaining runway. That is based on local environmental conditions, length of runway and GW of the aircraft at that time.
     
  6. 10mmAuto

    10mmAuto Guest

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    I don't know about all that. All I know is what I saw happen on a Boeing test 747. Boeing attached one 777 engine in the place of a 747 engine out the Southern California Logistics Airport (VCV) (formerly known as "George AFB"). The Boeing propeller heads dropped 3 747 engines to flight idle and the 777 did the climb out, landing and full stop then another take off all on the one engine! Full tanks of fuel on the 747 as well! The engine looks twice the size in diameter than the current 747 engines being used!

    Massive power in a tight little package those 777 engines are....
     
  7. hokieglock

    hokieglock Proud Infidel

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    not quite true, a part 121 airliner must be able to t/o or stop at v1 with an engine failure. this might be what you were trying to say.:thumbsup:
     
  8. IslandHopper

    IslandHopper Guest

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    bunch 'o darn lawyers!

    We are not ALLOWED to depart from a given runway at a given wieght unless we are able to continue the takeoff with an engine failure at V1. Sure, the airframe is CAPABLE of more, but it doesn't happen ;) outside of the flight-test environment.

    The net result is... anytime you see any airliner takeoff, it's capable of continuing that takeoff even if an engine fails (at or after V1).

    So, while the video is impressive, it's something that every airliner operating is capable of doing.
     
  9. 10mmAuto

    10mmAuto Guest

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    I just heard a news story today that Boeing's new 787 that is slatted to debut in a few months has extremely powerful and efficient engines.

    The news report said that Boeing claims that just one 787 engine has all of the power and thrust of 8 B-52 engines COMBINED!!!! Plus, better fuel efficiency.........

    Boeing is fantastic! Screw Airbus!!!!!