756 Pro III or FT2000

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by sdsnet, Jul 8, 2007.

  1. sdsnet

    sdsnet NRA Member CLM

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  2. G23Adam

    G23Adam .- -.. .- --

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    buy the FT 2000
     

  3. JBlitzen

    JBlitzen Guest

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    Check out the eham product reviews, but I'm concerned that if you can't decide between those two, you may not be able to take sufficient advantage of either over a much cheaper 706 or whatever. I know I can't, personally.
     
  4. martho

    martho Guest

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    Let's start with what you want to do with the radio?

    Are you going to contest and/or chase countries in a crowded band condition environment?

    The FT-2000(at least the version before the August 2007 firmware upgrade) is notorious for getting killed by strong adjacent signals. Two guys locally have them and one sold his and bought a IC-7800 instead and the other is suffering along with his 2000.

    I have never seen nor touched a proIII. My only concern with this radio would be the digital filtering. All of the DSP filtering is very prone to overloading from strong adjacent signals. I would find something you can use with crystal filtering.

    The HF radio you choose is going to need to fit your usage. If you are going to get on 40m phone and ragchew with the nets, you don't need much of a radio. If you are going to contest in extremely busy band conditions and/or chase countries where you need a super RX to hear the light CW from the south pacific, then you should look at higher end stuff.

    Tell us what you plan to do with the radio and hopefully we can generate some quality information for you.
     
  5. JBlitzen

    JBlitzen Guest

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    +1 to martho. As a reminder, the antenna and installation will make a much larger difference than the radio itself.
     
  6. sdsnet

    sdsnet NRA Member CLM

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    I'm looking for a radio with an exceptional receiver. I want to make long distance contacts on CW and phone. I'm interested in packet radio as well. I would like good receiver scanning capabilities. The bandscope and spectrum analyzer are appealing and I have read that owners really appreciate having them both. I would like a good pc interface as well. I want a rig that has easy to use menus so things aren't nested too deep. I don't see myself contesting in the future.

    I understand how important the antenna system is Right now I am using an MFJ 1796 vertical antenna mounted on a 20 foot mast. I will invest in a better antenna(s) once I decide which bands I want to spend the most time on. I plan to install the best antenna system I can without getting in trouble with my home owner's association. I also have a 24 foot Solarcon IMAX 2000 on a 10 foot mast and both antennas are hidden by trees in front and back. I intend to push the envelope a bit with my home owner's association by moving to better and better antennas as I grow into the hobby. Eventually we plan to move to the country on a piece of land so I will surely end up with a very nice antenna system then.

    http://www.mfjenterprises.com/products.php?prodid=MFJ-1796

    I will have to read more about problems with the DSP.

    Currently I am using an old Yaesu FT-707 that is good for 10/12/15/17/20/30/40 and 80 meters. I'm going to take my time in selecting a new rig.

    I want to find a really good rig that is very functional and also asthetically pleasing to the eyes and ears. It should be one that I will enjoy for years that will help me find and communicate with others over long distances.
     
  7. martho

    martho Guest

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    a couple things:

    1. Most people don't use HF rigs for packet. While there is some HF packet, it is mostly done on VHF bands.
    2. Most people don't use a receiver in scan mode on HF.
    3. A band scope has its ups/downs. If you are contesting on 6m and want to see where the other signals are on the band, you can use the band scope to find activity. If you are just making casual contacts, you really don't care where the other stations are as you are going to use the VFO to find them anyway. If you are going to be chasing weak signals, sometimes they won't even show on the bandscope, but are there.
    4. There is nothing wrong with your choices in this thread. You would probably be happy with either. Just remember, not everyone needs a $3K radio for what they do. I have a FT-1000MP and love the radio. It has seven optional crystal filters and allows real flexibility in playing with the rcvr. If you plan to chase countries and they use split, dual RX is VITAL to your success. YMMV
    5. rig control. Rig control is great if you have it interfaced to your logging program and that is all you do. However, many radios that have a separate PC control are very difficult to operate. The TS-2000 and IC-746 fit this category. You should really try PC rig control before you consider it as one of your requirements.

    Hope this helps and keep the questions coming. Hopefully some others can chime in, too.
     
  8. sdsnet

    sdsnet NRA Member CLM

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    Thank you for the information. As you can tell I am very new at this. I probably should keep using my FT-707 for quite awhile anyway before I buy.

    Since folks don't use scan mode on HF what is the best way to find contacts ? Do you start at the bottom of a band, listen for activity and then call CQ a few times, wait for an answer and then move up the band ? Do you try even numbered frequencies first or is there some other popular method for making contacts ?

    Do most people start out on 2 meters or 70 cm before moving to HF ? I would think many would because they start out as a technician for awhile before upgrading to general.
     
  9. JBlitzen

    JBlitzen Guest

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    martho's dead on, in my limited experience. The tools that are useful in VHF aren't so important in HF. Bands are much smaller, so a few standard and common calling frequencies are all you'd need if a good band is dead, but it usually won't be. You're more likely to be playing "tune in Tokyo" with the VFO. That's not to say it's difficult in decent conditions, just... different from VHF which has fixed repeaters for people to congregate on. Consider that you can sweep through, for instance, the 20 meter band in maybe three spins of the VFO, then fine tune by selecting a different step. Scanning isn't a big benefit compared to that.

    I am not heavily into HF contesting or other intricate tasks, and I couldn't name a single thing that my 706 rig can't do that I'd like it to. It'd be nice if it baked, maybe. That doesn't mean that more expensive radios aren't substantively better; just that, at the moment, I wouldn't know how to take advantage of them.

    The more I learn, the less I know...
     
  10. R. Emmelman

    R. Emmelman Guest

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    Calling CQ is not as popular as it use to be although you can still hear some doing so. A good way to make contacts is to check into some nets. There are many "rag chew" type nets that once you check in you will have a chance to make comments etc. Also there are many nets dedicated to topics or groups (i.e. old timer net, county hunters net). If you are interested in PSK31, I hear alot of stations calling CQ in that mode.

    73
     
  11. FN64

    FN64 Guest

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    As RE said.. nets are a great place to start. Listen for awhile to get the feel of what's going on & how the net is run then when the control station asks for checkins give your call. Here's a list of nets from the ac6v site. I don't know how current this is so some may be inactive.
    http://www.ac6v.com/nets.htm

    Tune around.. you hear a couple folks talking.. wait till they're done then call one of them.

    *I* call CQ.. and get answered!! I don't know why more folks don't CQ.. I've been on 15 meters before and the band sounded dead so I call CQ a few times & the next thing ya know theres folks popping up all over. As Forrest Gump sez.. it's like a box of chocolates... ya never know who you're going to get..

    Above all.. relax.. have fun & meet some great people. That's what it's all about.

    73..FN
     
  12. R. Emmelman

    R. Emmelman Guest

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    I find it funny that 20-meters shuts down in the evening... except on field day. Heard stations on at 3 am. :rofl:
     
  13. martho

    martho Guest

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    20 is open most of the night. The last month or so, 20 has been good over the pole. If all you are looking for are domestic contacts, they are sleeping. If you are playing in the DX window either phone/CW, there are usually signals on 20 most of the night.

    I would suggest RTTY over PSK. There are 10 stations on RTTY for every one on PSK.

    I have said this many times in the last few months, the bands might be at the bottom of the cycle, but there is still great stuff to work. I worked Botswana on 17cw a couple hours ago with 100w and a crappy vertical (my 17m antenna is down right now so I tuned a full size 40m vert)

    Six meters has been a riot the last month, too. Some Eu, Sa and Caribbean in the log. If you are on the east coast, Eu has been in everyday for two weeks