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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To anyone experienced in reloading the 357 SIG:

If you run 357 Sig brass thru a 40 cal sizing die only and then seat a bullet and then crimp it is there enough neck tension to hold the bullet in place and avoid set back?

I have a Dillon SDB I've been cranking out 40 on a for a few years but lately I've been shooting a bunch of factory 357 Sig. I got to playing with some of the brass on the SDB. 95% of my once fired 357 brass will pass the barrel kerplunk test after going thru the 40 cal sizing die. I realize that the neck part is not getting resized and Dillon doesn't make 357 dies for the SDB.

If I bought a 9mm powder funnel/ neck flare die and a 9mm crimp die for the last station and had my buddy who works in a machine shop ream out the bottom of the crimp die so that the fat 40 cal part of the 357 Sig brass doesn't hit anything before the neck gets crimped........ everything gets done except sizing the shoulder & neck but if the brass still drops in my chamber is that really an issue?

I realize I could buy a cheap Lee press and dies for around the same price but I certainly won't be cranking out 300+ rds an hour like I can on the SDB.

TIA for any advice.
 

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No. The crimp does not make the neck tension. Sizing the neck is not the only concern, you have to bump the shoulder back as well to get reliable function. You may also get poor powder burn as a result of no neck tension which can lead to poor accuracy and a high extreme velocity spread.

A powder like AA#9 would help prevent setback due to the bullet base resting on the powder charge. However you would still have the powder burn issue. It is not ideal and the neck should be sized and the shoulder bumped back.

I would contact Dillon and ask them about a .357sig die set. Won't hurt to come off a little frustrated or desperate. Maybe they will consider making a run of .357sig dies or adding them to their catalog.

If not a Lee Classic Turret press, set of Lee .357sig dies, pro autodisk and etc will be a fairly inexpensive setup to make .357sig ammo at a decent pace. This is why I do not care for any press that requires proprietary dies.
 

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No, what you are doing isn't going to work for two reasons. You will not resize the neck for proper nec tension & you will not get the shoulder back into it's proper location for headspace. There are no short cuts in the 357sig. It's fine to use the 40 sizer to size the head/body area but you MUST use the 357sig sizer to get the rest correct.
FWIW, NEVER rely on a full case of powder to prevent setback. It is controll by proper die setup & bullet choice. You can't short cut it, buy another press, &/or dies to reload the 357sig properly. A setback w/ a max load will not be a pleasent exp.
 

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Just finished checking around and found .357SIG LEE DIES on Amazon.com. Ordered the 3-die set (sizing/decapping, flaring, and seating), plus the factory crimp die (also Lee), which is separate, also on Amazon. The total was only at little over $60 (that's for 4 dies, plus shipping).

I've used Lee dies before, and they're just fine. I have been pissed for a long time that RCBS, Hornady (I don't even know if they make them at all), and several of the other big reloading companies only make and sell the 2-die sets for .357SIG. So I figure if I can get a 3-die set, and the factory crimp die, too, for only $60, it's got to be a helluva good deal.

The one rub is: it may be a couple of months before I get the 3-die set; the factory crimp die is available now. That's just fine with me; I can wait. Doubt I'll be loading any SIG's up for a while, as I still have several hundred reloads from 3 years ago, plus some factory ammo as well.

The .357SIG caliber is just simply superb. More folks should try it. I've got 3 guns (2 SIG's and a Glock) in this caliber, and I'd like to get another one, but I'm saving up for a Gen 4 G20 (gonna take a long time at the rate I save $).

Good luck,
AK
 

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I see the square deal uses a tool head. Has anyone every tried having a new toolhead machined to accept standard dies? Or is there not enough room or other issues.
 

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I see the square deal uses a tool head. Has anyone every tried having a new toolhead machined to accept standard dies? Or is there not enough room or other issues.
Even if it would fit, which it won't, just buy another press.:dunno: When I went to a progressive, I shunned the SDB because it was so limited, went to the 550 instead, never regretted it. MY advice to the OP as well, sell the SDBm buy the 550 instead, loading enough 357sig to feed 3 guns would be daunting on a ss press.:faint:
 

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Is there that much difference in price between a square deal and similarly equipped 550 to justify the existence of the square deal? Honestly I never gave the square deal a second look because of the proprietary dies.
 

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Is there that much difference in price between a square deal and similarly equipped 550 to justify the existence of the square deal? Honestly I never gave the square deal a second look because of the proprietary dies.
It isn't just about price although the SDB is $60 cheaper than the 550B. The SDB includes the dies and if we're talking Dillon pistol dies, that is another $64. So, basically, the SDB is a $124 cheaper albeit more limited press than the 550B.

The SDB is fully progressive and that, to me, is an important feature. I am seriously considering the SDB for my wife's first attempt at reloading - .40 S&W. I already have two 550s, a 650 and 1050 but I really like the simplicity of the SDB. There would never be a caliber change, it doesn't need a case feeder for her ammo needs and there is no likely way to double charge a case.

I could see setting up a small bench just for her reloading. Everything necessary stored in one spot. Just walk up and start loading.

And it's $124 cheaper...

Richard
 

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I figured around $100 or so just was not 100% sure. Since I would most likely buy Lee dies if I were buying it would be around 4100. Honestly I don't really see the auto indexing in the square deal as being a huge positive because you still have to place the bullet on the case.
 

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I figured around $100 or so just was not 100% sure. Since I would most likely buy Lee dies if I were buying it would be around 4100. Honestly I don't really see the auto indexing in the square deal as being a huge positive because you still have to place the bullet on the case.
The point is that the shell plate rotates the filled case out from under the powder measure, automatically. That is a big deal! To me...

This doesn't mean that the operator doesn't have to look at the powder charge in the case but it really helps prevent the most disastrous of reloading mistakes.

And, yes, Lee dies are about $30 cheaper than Dillon but, in my view, the Dillon dies are superior in every possible way. They're worth the extra cost. And, let's face it, $30 isn't much when talking about reloading equipment!

Richard
 

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If you are that concerned about double charges don't use fast burning low bulk powders.

I guess cost really is not the issue as even if the 550 was $250 more than the square deal I would buy the 550. Proprietary dies is a hair brained idea at best when the entire industry has standardized dies.

IMO the Lees have the advantage in the depriming and sizing further down the case.
 

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If you are that concerned about double charges don't use fast burning low bulk powders.
These days, one uses what they can get! I started using 700-X for .45 ACP back in '82 or so. I have never changed my load. It is a VERY fast powder and it is pretty easy to triple charge a case without overflowing.

I guess cost really is not the issue as even if the 550 was $250 more than the square deal I would buy the 550. Proprietary dies is a hair brained idea at best when the entire industry has standardized dies.
The 550B is a great press. I have one for small primer and another for large primer. I don't know how long I have had them but its been a very long time.

IMO the Lees have the advantage in the depriming and sizing further down the case.
I bought a Lee sizing die for 9mm and I'm pretty sure it is in the toolhead. I'm not sure that it was necessary. If there was really a problem with the Dillon sizing die, it would come up a lot more often and by more seasoned reloaders than those who just can't get a sizing die adjusted properly. I'm pretty sure the Dillon dies are getting used in 650 and 1050 presses every day! I don't hear any complaints!

I prefer the Dillon decapping pin arrangement over the infamous Lee collet. I also like the snap spring on the decapping pin. The primer WILL be leaving the building! And it's not coming back!

The seating and taper crimp die can be disassembled without removing the body of the die from the toolhead. No lost adjustments!

I also like the 1" hex lockrings.

In my view, the Dillon dies are worth every penny. But I still thought I would try the Lee sizing die :faint:

OTOH, a lot of people prefer Lee...

Richard
 

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I was at three local shops within the last 4 days and powder has really sprung back but the primer and bullet selection was not up to snuff yet though. But they had stock. Picked up a lb each of TAC, Varget and HS6 for under $70 out the door. Had lots of powder. I think I will go back this week and snag the 8lb jug of TAC they had for $130.

But went to the local Cabelas on Sunday and was the opposite. They had more primers than you could shake a stick at but powder was nil.

I can't say I really prefer Lee over other brands as I have other brands. But the Lee dies are a good value for the money. I have yet to break a Lee decapping pin even on crimped .223/5.56.

I do think if Dillon would make an auto indexing 550 and keep the cost well under what a stripped 650 costs they would sell them like hot cakes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
thanks for the responses on trying to shortcut the reloading process with the 357 Sig. I'll prolly just put it on the back burner for now till I decide if this is just a passing fancy or not and if I do go forward I'll be sure to get a full set of dies for it.

Converting 40 cal Glock pistols sure is easy though, just toss in the new 357 Sig barrel. I probably should just get a 10mm in my quest for more power. At least I know that the SDB in 40 cal will reload 10mm with just a few die adjustments and changing to the LPP feed system.

I bought the SDB for just a couple hundred bucks off of ebay about 3 or 4 yrs ago all set up for 40. It has performed flawlessly. I can crank out 300 rds an hour easily. If it had a case feeder I could do 500 I bet. I admit it does have its limitations, straight wall pistol cases only is probably the biggest one. Oh well, it is what it is.......
 

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It isn't just about price although the SDB is $60 cheaper than the 550B. The SDB includes the dies and if we're talking Dillon pistol dies, that is another $64. So, basically, the SDB is a $124 cheaper albeit more limited press than the 550B.

The SDB is fully progressive and that, to me, is an important feature. I am seriously considering the SDB for my wife's first attempt at reloading - .40 S&W. I already have two 550s, a 650 and 1050 but I really like the simplicity of the SDB. There would never be a caliber change, it doesn't need a case feeder for her ammo needs and there is no likely way to double charge a case.

I could see setting up a small bench just for her reloading. Everything necessary stored in one spot. Just walk up and start loading.

And it's $124 cheaper...

Richard
Richard, the 550B is also "fully progressive", auto indexing or manual, they both deliver one round of ammo with each pull of the handle, the definition of a progressive. Where Dillon messed up with the SDB IMO, making it limited to their dies & too small for rifle. OF course it is a good marketing move, but just a bad idea in general. I passed 30yrs ago, the slighlty cheaper cost should mean nothing to a reloader.
 

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Richard, the 550B is also "fully progressive", auto indexing or manual, they both deliver one round of ammo with each pull of the handle, the definition of a progressive.
I guess where I use "fully", I really mean auto-indexing. Semantics, I suppose.

I am fully aware of the capabilities and shortcomings of the 550B. I have had a pair for a very long time. Heck, I have a 450 going back even further than that.

I like auto-indexing, I think it is a really big deal and, if I were going to load one caliber only, I might give a lot of consideration to the SDB. Heck, it would be worth the cost just to play with the thing. I could always sell it later if I didn't like it!

As with the 550Bs, I am fully aware that the SDB has some serious shortcomings. But for a single caliber, where there is no intention to EVER change calibers and high volume isn't the primary goal, it might make a nice starter machine. Kind of like the LCT of Dillon machines. It could even make a nice introductory machine for eventual progress to the 650. A place to start...

Richard
 
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