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(3) Female Sugar Gliders **SALE** (TRADE?)

Discussion in 'Sold/Expired' started by glock281, Sep 13, 2003.

  1. glock281

    glock281

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    Hello We have 3 female sugar gliders that we would like to sell (we just can't spend a lot of time with them now).

    We will not break them up, they are a happy family and we want to keep them that way.

    asking $425.00 for 3 sugar gliders (approx 10 months old)
    Nice Big hanging cage with stand
    misc food and toys.

    please contact us if you are interested.

    We are located in Tennessee I will travel a little distance if you wanted to meet somewhere. I have no experence in shipping animals but if you do I would be happy to ship them with your help


    please email us @ glock281@earthlink.net I can take pics of the cage if needed.


    Might trade for .....???? (gun related only please)
     
  2. glock281

    glock281

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  3. glock281

    glock281

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  4. ToyotaMan

    ToyotaMan

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    What the heck are those things???
     
  5. glock281

    glock281

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    Sugar gliders are cutie little marsupial possums (but not an opossum, it's actually a very different animal). Marsupials differ from other mammals in that have pouches. Sugar gliders keep their baby gliders in the mother's pouch for around 3 months before they finally come out on their own. Sugar gliders are originally from Australia, but are now bred in parts of the U.S. They are about the size of a hamster with a super-soft coat. They are called gliders because they have a 'gliding membrane' which extends from their front feet to their back feet, and allows them to strech out like a kite and glide. In the wild, sugar gliders have made recorded glides of up to 150 feet.

    In the wild, gliders eat mainly sap, insects, and nectar. In my house they eat fruit, vegetables, meat (mainly chicken), and mealworms.