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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After watching countless YouTube videos and visiting a handful of web sites on the subject, I elected to try my hand at the $.25 trigger job. As I polished I wondered why Glock didn't do this at the factory during production. The answer was soon apparent.

What was the change? How dramatic was the decrease in trigger pull and trigger smoothness? Nothing... Nada... I really didn't notice any change at all.

I spent the evening working over three different Glocks from three generations. I started with my newest Glock, a Gen4 G26. Of my Glocks, this one has the heaviest trigger pull of them all. No change.

I then ventured to my Gen2 G23. This pistol has been with me since 1995, but the trigger still feels the same after polishing the "critical" areas.

The last pistol I tried was my wife's Gen3 G19. This pistol has the best trigger pull of the three and I expected at least a little more smoothness. Again, nothing.

I understand the process doesn't lighten the trigger pull, but rather claims to take the gritty feel away which in turn give the appearance of lighter and smoother.

I guess my triggers were fairly smooth already. With regards to this polishing procedure the take away is: Your Mileage May Vary...

Edmo
 

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"As I polished I wondered why Glock didn't do this at the factory during production. The answer was soon apparent."

Not so apparent in your case with all due respect. The factory doesn't do this for two reasons: 1. The additional cost of labor that would be incurred and have to passed on to the consumer and 2. Glocks are principally defensive vice target weapons and polished parts or unpolished parts they will do what they were designed to do - protect your behind at typically close distances.

The parts you polished specifically the trigger/trigger bar is a stamped-out unit. It is not unusual to find burrs and other imperfections that when polished can make a difference, a felt difference. Glocks philosophy however is that all trigger/trigger bars are created equal.

Admittedly, any improvement is somewhat subjective but I have found over the the years that polishing if done correctly, can result in a smoother overall trigger. And the work can be done quickly and without an abundance of technical knowledge (if you follow the directions). Better yet, replacement parts are inexpensive if you screw up. I usually set aside the trigger bar t hat came in the gun and replace it with a polished part. If an when I ever decide to sell/trade the gun-in, I re-install the stock, unpolished parts.

Many myself included find the .25 trigger job relaxing and worth the effort. It certainly can't hurt anything if you stick to light polishing vs. grinding away and changing the geometry of the parts.
 

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MacGyver
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It depends on your expectations. Don't expect a massive change, or the glock turning into a 1911.

The biggest difference is perceived on a new trigger group.

The polishing of components also occurs when the parts rub together during firing.

From 500-1000 rounds fired, the trigger action gets real smooth. Considering the cost of getting to this point with ammo: If you don't want to spend that much ammo in getting a smooth trigger, then this is cheap, and you get more than you pay for.:tongueout:

Couple this with a (-) trigger connector, and it is very nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
"As I polished I wondered why Glock didn't do this at the factory during production. The answer was soon apparent."

Not so apparent in your case with all due respect.
To the contrary, as I stated in the OP, the answer was soon very apparent. In the case of my three pistols it didn't really help anything and, as you pointed out, it would be a waste of labor for Glock to do the polishing when it really doesn't do much, if any good.

The good thing is this polishing doesn't hurt the pistols. I really can't tell any difference in any of my triggers.

Edmo
 

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IMHO it does make a noticeable difference when you have a non pollished glock to compare it to. If done correctly it make a very notieable difference.
 

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If done correctly and some advanced things are done like beveling the FPS, it can make a huge difference. The youtube video you watched may be overly conservative. You may not have enough polish on the true contact points.
 

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From what I understand the real magic is to also install a lighter connector and striker spring when you do the 25 cent trigger job. I did this to an old G23 of mine and the trigger pull is outstanding; much lighter and crisper. A real improvement if you ask me, but I will no longer CCW it.
 

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"As I polished I wondered why Glock didn't do this at the factory during production. The answer was soon apparent."

Not so apparent in your case with all due respect. The factory doesn't do this for two reasons: 1. The additional cost of labor that would be incurred and have to passed on to the consumer and 2. Glocks are principally defensive vice target weapons and polished parts or unpolished parts they will do what they were designed to do - protect your behind at typically close distances...
Glock goes so far as to publish their Standards of Professionalism for Glock Armorers which paraphrashed, says in part:
1) Don't polish parts
2) Don't install aftermarket parts.
 

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My experience is that it does improve the trigger pull with an added benefit of the polished parts being easier to clean. It doesn't make the trigger any lighter, just smoother. I polish the inside of my magazines and the outside surface of the springs as well because it makes it easier to get the last few rounds in. I put NY springs in all my Glocks so I'm certainly not after a light trigger, just a smooth one.
 

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Pay the most attention to the Firing pin block/ramp that is where a smoother take-up is apparent
 

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It's not going to shave off pounds of trigger weight, but I could definitely tell the difference after I did these jobs on my pistols. I think your expectations were too high. It might shave off half a pound. I think the cheap job is more than worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It's not going to shave off pounds of trigger weight, but I could definitely tell the difference after I did these jobs on my pistols. I think your expectations were too high. It might shave off half a pound. I think the cheap job is more than worth it.
I enjoyed doing the polish job and tearing into my 3 pistols so from that angle is was worth it. I knew there would be minimal if any drop in trigger weight, but based on posts I expected a little more benefit.

I didn't use a trigger pull gauge, so all of my results are based on feel. However, I and several others dry fired the pistols numerous times before and after each pistol was completed to see if there was any change. We compared the pistol to the other two pistols both before and after the polish job. I guess my three pistols were relatively "grit-free" and smooth to begin with since there was really no big difference.

Don't think I'm advising against polishing your pistols. I'm just relaying my results on three different pistols as "tested" by several shooters. There may have been some benefit to my triggers, but we really couldn't feel it.

Edmo
 

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My trigger improved on my Gen4 G19 but polishing was not enough. The stamping of the metal was visible and putting chrome on it doesn't make sense to me. I had to stone it first to obtain flat surface first to have acceptable smooth trigger pull.
I know that $500 for a gun is not much nowadays but still Glock shouldn't call it perfection.

 

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My trigger improved on my Gen4 G19 but polishing was not enough. The stamping of the metal was visible and putting chrome on it doesn't make sense to me. I had to stone it first to obtain flat surface first to have acceptable smooth trigger pull.
I know that $500 for a gun is not much nowadays but still Glock shouldn't call it perfection.

I too first stone using a 700 grit stone with honing oil, followed by 800 grit wet/dry paper and light (slow speed) polishing with a Dremel, felt tip and Flitz polish. Whether we like to admit it or not, these are mass-produced weapons and prudent polishing can help (I have seen some really ragged looking trigger/trigger bars).

The opposing side will advise that polishing the trigger/trigger bar, connector, etc. renders the part less resistant to rust. In all my years of shooting Glocks I have never heard of a trigger/trigger bar, connector, safety plunger and/or firing pin lug rusting if given reasonable care, i.e, light (very light) lubrication applied to the connector and trigger bar. Nor have I ever heard of a gun becoming inoperable post a .25 trigger job unless the work performed was extreme (keep in mind Glock has no control over things once the gun leaves the factory), e.g, bending or excessive metal removal.

Light polishing and the removal of superficial burrs is a good thing as long as the integrity of the part has not been compromised. Go overboard and yes, you could have a problem. Having said the .25 trigger job is strictly optional. With or without it, your gun will shoot reliably with bullets striking the intended target if you do your part.
 

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IMHO it does make a noticeable difference when you have a non pollished glock to compare it to. If done correctly it make a very notieable difference.
I agree and especially if you change to a 3.5 connector, then it's a night and day difference.
 

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I too first stone using a 700 grit stone with honing oil, followed by 800 grit wet/dry paper and light (slow speed) polishing with a Dremel, felt tip and Flitz polish. Whether we like to admit it or not, these are mass-produced weapons and prudent polishing can help (I have seen some really ragged looking trigger/trigger bars)...

...The opposing side will advise that polishing the trigger/trigger bar, connector, etc. renders the part less resistant to rust. In all my years of shooting Glocks I have never heard of a trigger/trigger bar, connector, safety plunger and/or firing pin lug rusting if given reasonable care...

...Light polishing and the removal of superficial burrs is a good thing as long as the integrity of the part has not been compromised. Go overboard and yes, you could have a problem. Having said the .25 trigger job is strictly optional. With or without it, your gun will shoot reliably with bullets striking the intended target if you do your part.
Agree with entire post wholeheartedly...
 

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My trigger went from night to day, much smoother takeup and lighter trigger. However, when i first assembled the components back together the trigger was really funky, after freaking out for 5 mins i took it apart and put a light coat of oil on all the parts i polished and went from rough to smooth. My dry-fire training has improved also as the trigger is not as gritty as it use to be. It ain't no Dan Wesson though.
 

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....I guess my triggers were fairly smooth already. With regards to this polishing procedure the take away is: Your Mileage May Vary... Edmo

You, sir, are correct!

It seems all my Glocks have been very smooth from the factory while other folks have had extremely bad luck.


 
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