25 cent trigger job ruins trigger bar??

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by cherokeewarrior, Oct 29, 2013.

  1. cherokeewarrior

    cherokeewarrior NRA Life Member

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    I probably should have mentioned in the first post that the comment about polishing causing the trigger parts to require replacement was made by a guy who wanted to sell me some replacement parts:)
     
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  2. DirectDrive

    DirectDrive

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    This ^^^
    OP, get a new "advisor".
     
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  3. G26-Has-my-6

    G26-Has-my-6

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    I'm a fan of the 25 cent trigger job. Follow this guide and you will not harm a thing. notice he only polishes the areas that improve the function of the trigger. Also he uses aluminum mag polish, designed to polish a MUCH softer material...aluminum.

    After I polish, I douse the trigger parts in ballistol, let them sit a few minutes and wipe off as best I can. it leaves the parts teflon like slick. I repeat the ballistol process every time I do a detail strip. it makes all my Glocks feel the same, and the triggers are smooth as silk and the trigger parts never get those wear grooves you see when you just shoot a Glock for thousands of rounds when it started off with 1 small part that had a burr.


    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_edmc5iih0E
     
  4. jmohme

    jmohme

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    While I have never done the 25 cent trigger job on any of mine, I think it has been around as long as Glocks have existed. If it were destructive, I think people would have stopped doing it.
     
  5. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

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    No, I've never had any problems either with polishing or with grinding OE bars to different profiles. I have two bars with ~75k on them, and they work like they did on Day 1.
     
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  6. Deadduck357

    Deadduck357

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  7. sugerwater

    sugerwater

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    I polish all the internal parts with Mothers Mag Polish and a soft rag. Makes cleanup easy. Striker, complete trigger bar, safety Plunger, striker spring and extractor plunger with spring. Also detail and deburr the magazine internals.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2020
  8. Duck of Death

    Duck of Death

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    And does NOTHING!!!
     
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  9. RPMSTL

    RPMSTL

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    If you really want to smooth out the pull, work on the firing pin channel liner and spring cups. The cups have friction as the pieces of cheap plastic slide through the liner during the triggering process.

    The trigger bars birds head getting past the firing pin safety is the next area to work on.

    Then address the connector/trigger bar and firing pin lug/cruciform matings.

    Don’t forget to check out how the cruciform rides along and off the ‘shelf’. Some trigger bars have horrible edges due to stamping the parts out of a sheet of metal.

    Don’t be afraid to experiment. Cheapest trigger parts on the market if you screw them up.

    Finally, research and perform all safety checks before live ammo is used. Especially the engagement of the firing pin lug and cruciform.
    This is the likely double tap cause.
    If it doesn’t have 1/3 engagement, bend it or try another trigger bar. There are plenty of variances in the factory parts.
     
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  10. mmcbeat

    mmcbeat

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    You can get the same benefit of a 25 cent trigger job by dry firing A LOT. The best Glock trigger I ever experienced was a very experienced Gen 2 Glock that used to make the rounds and was traded among friends. I owned it at least three times,
     
  11. Quijibo

    Quijibo King Doofus.

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    I'm probably one of the few that use a dremel. I've been polishing innards for decades with them. I also have probably thousands of hours shaping, modding, polishing hand made motorcycle parts in steel, stainless steel, aluminum, brass....
    It's not rocket surgery, but it is easy to F something up if you're even a tiny bit ham fisted.
    Every new Glock I buy gets a strip down, inspection, touch-up. The .25 p job takes the least amout of time and gives me a chance to get a good look at it's innerds.
     
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  12. OXMYX

    OXMYX

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    I do the $250 trigger jobs.

    All mine break glass at #3.5 to 4.0

    Why wait 2000 rounds when I can get it today?
     
  13. Duck of Death

    Duck of Death

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    "QUOTE"
    You can get the same benefit of a 25 cent trigger job by dry firing A LOT.

    OR you can learn how to do a trigger job & save $$ on ammo--I had a 3.1lb trigger on a G29 before it fired a shot
     
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  14. dg370

    dg370

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    I have polished the internals with Flitz using a patch only. Polished up nice and shiny. One thing to avoid is getting cleaner/lube into the firing pin channel, etc. Tends to bind up those components.
     
  15. JBP55

    JBP55

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    A friend brought me a like new Gen 5 G45 this week that Bubba had worked on. The 10 trigger pull average was 7# 15 oz. When he picked it up later it had a 10 trigger pull average of 2# 10 oz. similar to a G17 I had done for him last year. This is going to be a Range Only Glock for a very experienced shooter.
     
  16. CanyonMan

    CanyonMan In The Saddle

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    Polishing all the internals with Flitz, for decades, has not once hurt any of my Glocks, or any other gun I do it too... If they can't handle some polishing, They can't handle anything else.






    CanyonMan
    :horse:
     
  17. GlockyQ

    GlockyQ Custom Title

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    Not at all. If what you have been told were true, any Glock that has fired a few thousand rounds would loose the hard surface and the contact points would wear rapidly, resulting in heavier trigger pull... Obviously, there are no such issues reported.
     
  18. soutthpaw

    soutthpaw

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    I use blue rouge bar ( basically no abrasive in it) with a 6” cotton buffing wheel on a bench polisher and have had no issues. I do a lot of plastic and metal polishing. I can tell you a rubbing or polishing compound takes off more then the buffing wheel and bar. Polishing plastic u see what has more effect comparing compounds, polished and methods.
    Machine polishing can create a much smoother surface than hand polishing.
     
  19. harold63

    harold63 I'm not retired

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    I deburr the bearing surfaces with wet dry paper, usually sticking to 1500 and 2000 grits with the occasionally need 1000. Have not seen any wearing through of any kind of plating. These grits when used with a thin oil (I use plain 'ol '3 in 1') do not remove anything other than the burrs and the extreme edges from manufacturing. Polishing burrs with a Dremel can make it better, but will never completely deburr without removing tool metal.
     
  20. OdinIII

    OdinIII

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    I use a Dremel and have never had a problem. I have Glock with many thousands through them, still no problems.