2017 Recommendations For Best Reloading Complete Kits

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Franky427, Feb 24, 2017.

  1. Franky427

    Franky427

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    Howdy,
    I'm new to the reloading game. I have a copy of Lyman's Reloading Manual and I have read the first 5 or so chapters. I'd like to start out right with a quality setup. I don't want too many bells and whistles, but I also want a system that I can scale up later and add the cool features.

    I'm also looking for stuff that will last a lifetime.

    Thanks y'all
     
  2. Terlingueno

    Terlingueno

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    Dillon BL550
     
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  3. SJ 40

    SJ 40 Deplorable,Clinger

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    What Terlingueno said. SJ 40
     
  4. Taterhead

    Taterhead

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    What are you going to load?
     
  5. Franky427

    Franky427

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    9mm, .223/5.56, .308, 30-06, .50BMG
     
  6. crockett

    crockett

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    How many rounds a month are you shooting these days and is this going to change in future? Do you shoot benchrest or matches?
     
  7. Franky427

    Franky427

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    I don't shoot anything competition wise. But it's something I might be interested in doing. I'm hopefully joining a shooting club and I expect to shoot maybe a few hundred rounds a week
     
  8. crockett

    crockett

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    A Dillon 550 will do in your case, personably I'd opt for the 650 and go auto index to speed things up.

    https://www.dillonprecision.com/xl650_8_1_23803.html


    If you plan on up-working your own load recipes, a separate 'single stage' press will be the best option. I'd go with a Redding T-7 turret since you asked for quality that will last a lifetime, and then some. This turret holds 7 dies and makes working in batches really easy. This is the only turret press with absolutely zero wiggle.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/588482/redding-t-7-turret-press
     
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  9. kf4zra

    kf4zra I miss ya Murph

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    I own a 550 and a 1050, and both are amazing machines. I used to have a 650 and upgraded it to the 1050.
    I think the 650 is the best machine out there for many people. reasonable caliber conversions, auto indexing and lifetime warranty.
     
  10. jdavionic

    jdavionic NRA Member

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    I have a single stage and a Lee Pro1000. The Pro 1000 (for me) is a bit finicky. I use it effectively but I have many years experience. I think Dillon 650 or Hornady LNL would be better choices.
     
  11. unclebob

    unclebob DFC, MSM, 12 Air Medals.

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    You will need a complete different press for the .50bmg. For the rest for me 650.
     
  12. Franky427

    Franky427

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    Thanks everyone. I was browsing the Dillon 650 and got a bit of sticker shock LOL! I'm gonna start saving up some cash (gonna need to start skimming from my wife's purse :p)
     
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  13. crockett

    crockett

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    Buy once cry one...

    If you ever want to sell your equipment, the Dillons hold their value very well.
     
  14. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

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    I agree. I started with a 550, loaded 9mm on that for a few years, then got a 1050 to go with it. If I had to do it again, would do it the same way, but probably get the 1050 a little sooner.
     
  15. Franky427

    Franky427

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    Isn't the 1050 really more for someone cranking out ammo for like actual production / sale?
     
  16. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

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    I think that was Dillon's original intent, but 1050's are very popular for personal use. I know a bunch of other USPSA people who have them, some have more than 1, all for personal use.

    I like the 1050 much better than the 650. It's a more robust machine. It accepts accessories better, and I think it's easier to cycle consistently manually. And if you're going to motorize it, the 1050 is much, much better than the 650.

    I shoot about 40,000 rounds/year of 9mm, all the same load. Takes about 40 minutes to load 1,000 rounds on the 1050 using pick-up tubes. So I'm probably right about at the break point where the 1050 pulls away from the 650. But I like the construction and operation of the 1050 a lot better, and I would prefer it over the 650 even if it weren't more efficient.

    The cost difference is insignificant in the long run. I spent less than $2,000 to fully set up my 1050 last year, and I spent about $16,000 on components. The 1050 will easily outlive my shooting career.
     
  17. Franky427

    Franky427

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    Damn, you are a shooting fiend. Not sure I will get to 40,000 rounds per year. That being said, I am doing reloading more for the personal enjoyment and edification than actually trying to save a buck.

    That being said, I am looking forward to saving a buck. LOL
     
  18. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

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    Me too. I enjoy loading, and it helps my understanding of the overall shooting process.

    No matter how much you shoot, you get a vastly better product and it costs about half. So some of those savings can go into development of other things - like loading more efficiently.
     
  19. Franky427

    Franky427

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    Question for you guys regarding the Dillon 650 and 1050 models. I was watching some videos showing the function of the units. I really like the 1050.

    My question is according to Lyman's manual, you should resize the brass then check the overall length and trim to specification. How can this be done with the Dillon? Do you run the brass through to just deprime / shape then trim? It seems most people showing the unit on the web were depriming, resizing, and then just going for the loading process without checking OAL of the case.

    Thanks,
    Frank
     
  20. Taterhead

    Taterhead

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    Pistol ammo tends to shrink, not grow in my experience. Unlike bottleneck rifle cases that do grow. I've never trimmed an auto-loader case. So basically no one is resizing then measuring case length for straight wall auto-loader brass. All the operations get done in one pass.

    Rifle ammo like 223 is often reloaded in two passes. One tool head or die plate for sizing, de-capping and neck expanding. Then back into the case cleaner to remove case lube. At that point they can be trimmed. Some mount an electric case trimmer right on the tool head so that cases get trimmed during the first pass incidental to re-sizing.

    A second tool head will be used for the actual reloading of rifle brass.