1982 Honda CB750

Discussion in 'Moto Club' started by Busta Capp, Jun 29, 2005.

  1. Busta Capp

    Busta Capp

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    Anyone familiar with this bike?

    I have a very specific need, and this bike may fill the bill. In Ontario they have graduated licensing and you need to take a final test including a road portion and track portion. The track portion involves a lot of manouvering the bike through hard turns and such. My ideal bike would be a large cruiser, but I do not think this is the best to take the test with.

    My thoughts are buy the little 750cc agile bike, take (and pass) the final test, and then sell the bike for what I paid since that year bike will have little depreciation. Then take my time and buy the bike I want.

    My question is, does anyone know how reliable these bikes were, or were not? Any known issues? And any tips on buying a used bike of this age would be appreciated.
     
  2. Bullwinkle J Moose

    Bullwinkle J Moose Quick! Duck!

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    Hondas have since at least the mid 60s a reputation for being reliable as a brick. Of course technology has grown quite a bit in the last 20 years, so don't expect it to perform as well as a newer bike even if it were in mint shape. IMO a 20 year old bike has just too many possible problems (availability of parts may be a BIG one) to entrust it with my life. But that's just me. Maybe your life isn't as valuable to you as my life is to me.
     

  3. Romulas

    Romulas

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    Get a Ninja 250! For less than $3000 you can get a bike that will maneuver with anything in the twisties, is soooooo easy to ride and as about as much ooomph as that 750, believe me. That ninja weighs less than 300 lbs. They are awesome bikes. Easier to ride than a scooter and you can lean 'em over like any sport bike around.
     
  4. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    The old Hondas are bulletproof. The parallel-4 air/oil-cooled engine will go forever with regular maintenance. And I don't believe a Ninja 250 will keep up with it. (I own a Ninja500 and ZRX1200 and assume a CB750 would fall between)

    The old Nighthawk will have a standard configuration (as opposed to cruisers or sport bikes), which makes low speed manuevering easy.

    The bike will be heavy.

    In my area, clean bikes cost $$$ regardless of age. Most likely, for a couple hundred more than what your looking at spending on this CB750, you can get a decade newer bike... So you won't be playing the replacement game with cables and plastic bits as much.
     
  5. Rosey

    Rosey

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    I don't disagree with anything allready said. But I'll go ahead and add my $.02:

    The original CB750 (69'-78') had a 736cc SOHC 2-valve engine. In the 79'-82' CB750 the engine was redesigned and updated with DOHC and 4-valves per head. That basic engine continued all the way until CB750 production stopped in (IIRC) 2003. Almost 25 years is a long time for an engine to remain in production. I'm not entirely sure what substantive changes were made between 79' and 03', but I don't think there were many (if any, to the engine).

    The basics of the CB750 changed little in 34 years of production (78 to 79 was maybe the biggest change). That is indicative of how fundamentally sound the CB750 is/was. In my mind, the CB750 is the epitome of the Universal Japanese Motorcycle (an outdated term to be sure, but fitting in this case).

    [​IMG]

    If a small(ish), agile bike is what you desire for you testing, I'm not sure an 82' CB750 would be MY first choice. First, they are not that small or agile. There are many bikes smaller, more agile, and easier to ride. Tire technology has come a long way, for example. If good handling is what you want I would mostly limit my self to bikes designed to use radial tires (vs. the bias-ply tires found on a 82' CB750). Second, a bike approaching it's 25th birthday should be approached with caution. Too often getting them up to snuff costs more than they are worth to a buyer looking for transportation (vs. collection/restoration).

    I would first look for (not necessarily in order) a Kawasaki Ninja R (EX500 or EX250); Suzuki GS500, GSF400 (Bandit 400), GSF600 (Bandit 600), Honda HawkGT (NT650), CB-1 (CB400F); Yamaha Seca II (XJ600S)...

    ...and there are others.
     
  6. Busta Capp

    Busta Capp

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    Thanks for the responses!

    I will keep an eye out for any newer bikes that fit the bill. With the used market you do not always have the luxury of what you want, when you want it, and in your area.

    I still have a month and a half before required to take the test, so will spend the time looking. Thanks again.
     
  7. TreeTrooper

    TreeTrooper Shhhhh...

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    My brother bought a clapped-out CB750 (81) for 300.00 a few years back. It had sat outside in the weather for a good while, and wasn't too pleasing to the eye. We changed the oil, changed the gas, and put a new battery in. He rode that thing to Florida (from PA), to Americade in Lake George NY, and twice to US129 in NC via the BRP. Still runs like a top. If he isn't on his Suzuki DR650, he's cruising on that nasty-looking old Honda.