10 22 upgrade

Discussion in 'Rimfire Forum' started by sig357fan, Jan 10, 2020.

  1. sig357fan

    sig357fan

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    looking to upgrade my 20 something year old 10 22.

    I've been looking at scopes with the BDC but they all seem to be for ranges out past 100 yards, are there any with the BDC calibrated for 25 to 100 yards?

    also looking at trigger upgrades, I've got the older metal trigger housing and would like to use that, haven't decided if I'll go replacement parts or work the original parts, just looking for something with a clean break and lower poundage, think squirrel gun not full competition.
     
  2. ede

    ede

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    Dollar for dollar the BX trigger is hard to beat. Down side is you can't run a flat trigger with it. The plastic trigger group I think is better made as far as consistency and accuracey or how it's made. If I were upgrading I'd want to start with a plastic trigger group. For upgrade parts I'd go to Tandemkross.
    For a scope I'd lood at a Christmas tree recticle instead of BDC. I think it would be more adaptable to shorter distances.
     
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  3. NJ1911

    NJ1911

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    For scopes I prefer an adjustable objective, since I can range with it and focus down to short distances if necessary. Look at Hawke Sport Optics. They have several very nice affordable scopes with AO's.

    For a trigger I've fallen in love with the Tandemkross flat trigger. I did have one 10/22 that did not like their hammer though. It is somewhat roughly finished where the bolt rides and would cause the bolt to drag. So, I replaced the hammer with Volquartsen parts but kept the flat trigger. Wonderful. Trigger has an over travel screw and I have mine down to almost a mouse click and they break around 2 pounds. I have the plastic trigger housings and no complaints.
     
  4. hardluk1

    hardluk1

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    Buy a clark customs trigger kit . You may want to keep your stock trigger but this is a good kit .

    https://clarkcustomguns.com/product/clark-1022-trigger-kit/

    scopes ! The minimum I would buy would be a - https://www.nikonsportoptics.com/en...scopes/p-tactical-rimfire-2-7x32-bdc-150.html - Use Nikons Spot On app to help with matching a load to the BDC -
    http://spoton.nikonsportoptics.com/spoton/spoton.html#:4

    Or you can to Walmart and buy a centerpoint scope for your 10/22 but you will also need a weaver rail for it . Mil dots depend on the ammo you use as in velocity so go to the range and figure it out what the mil dots mean for you .

    WE have two 10/22's but there about as far from stock as possible - Good luck
     
  5. mac66

    mac66 Huge Member Millennium Member

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    I have several Nikon Prostaff Rimfire II 3-9x BDCs on my 10/22s. Best bang for the buck IMO. Usually they are between $110-130. Nikon is getting out of the scope business so you might be able to find them on clearance at some point. Warranty would still be good.

    As far as triggers go, the BX trigger is probably the simplest solution.
     
  6. ARP

    ARP

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    My heavily modified (at this point only the trigger group parts and receiver are original), I swapped the barrel(Feddersen), stock out(Boyd Tacticool Monte Carlo style) and put a Nikon P-22 BDC scope on it. I can sight it for however close I want, but I sight for 50 yrds and then smack steel out to I think 200yd is the length at my local range. The trigger was worked by Brimestone Gunsmithing and I think pull weight is 3.5lb with a crisp glass rod type break, I think it was the tier 2 service. The scope is 2-7x and is more than adequate for what i do with it. I will say that that barrel adds a lot of weight to the gun.
     
  7. pblanc

    pblanc

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    There are a ton of aftermarket trigger options for the Ruger 10/22 depending on how much you want to spend. But most of them will require you to swap your aluminum trigger housing.

    If you really want to retain the metal housing, you could consider a simple swap of the sear/disconnector and the trigger return spring with the MCARBO spring kit. An excellent option would be to send your trigger group to Brimstone Gunsmithing for their Tier 2 trigger job kit which will replace the trigger blade with a flat trigger blade. A third possible option would be the Kidd Innovative Design single stage drop in trigger kit. This will improve the quality of a stock Ruger 10/22 trigger up to nearly the quality of the KID single stage trigger unit. But KID does not guarantee the kit will work in older metal trigger housings because of greater variability in tolerances with the metal trigger housing. But many people have gotten them to work in them.

    The Brimstone Tier 2 trigger job is probably the surest way to get a quite excellent trigger while retaining your old housing. It costs $85 plus the cost of the two way shipping and involves a 1-3 week turn-around time. The DIY Tony Kidd drop-in trigger kit costs $105 plus shipping. I have polymer trigger groups that have undergone both of these modifications as well as the KID one-stage complete trigger group. All are excellent and the Brimstone Tier 2 and the KID DIY kit are nearly as good as the KID complete unit.

    As for scopes, I have never used one with a ballistic drop compensation reticle on a 22lr rifle and I really see little point in one. There is so much variability in 22lr ammunition and the ballistic drop is going to be markedly dependent on just what ammunition you are shooting and exactly what muzzle velocity it achieves in your particular rifle as to render any BDC reticle only grossly accurate at best. After about 75 yards or so, the ballistic path of 22lr drops so rapidly that unless you have very precise range estimation, your BDC reticle would be pretty useless in any case. If you really do want to shoot 22lr at distances of 100 yards or more where the range is known, you are better off working out the exact drop in MOA at each distance with your particular rifle and ammunition and dialing the elevation adjustments into your scope. And if you choose a variable magnification scope, the BDC calibration will change with zoom for any common second focal plane scope.

    Most 22lr ammunition shoots relatively flat for only around 50 yards or so. If you zero your rilfe at 25 yards say, you will probably find that it shoots close to zero at 50 yards. After that, it starts dropping at a rate largely dependent on muzzle velocity. At 75 yards the "high velocity" 40 grain ammo will hit around 1 2/3" low with a 25 yard zero and the "standard velocity" 40 grain around 3 inches low. At 100 yards with the same zero the high velocity will hit 5 to 5 1/2" low and the standard velocity 8 " or a little more low. So if most of your shooting is minute of squirrel type shooting at 100 yards or less, you can simply zero at either 25 or 50 yards and shoot point blank within that range, then use a hold over of the appropriate number of inches at longer ranges up to 100 yards based on your range estimation. Your accuracy will probably be as good as if you were fooling around with a BDC reticle.

    I agree strongly with a scope with either an adjustable objective or side parallax adjustment feature if you plan to shoot at ranges of around 25 yards or less. This will allow much better target focus than a scope with fixed parallax focus set at 50 or 60 yards. I also like the Hawke Vantage scopes with AO and own both a Hawke Vantage 4X32 AO with fixed 4X magnification and a Hawke Vantage 3-9x40 AO, both with mil-dot reticles. The Nikon Prostaff Target EFR 3-9x40 is also and excellent scope with and adjustable objective and has been available at excellent prices since Nikon announced their intention to stop making rifle scopes.
     
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  8. Crownline202

    Crownline202

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  9. sig357fan

    sig357fan

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    thanks to all who have chimed in,

    I hadn't considered the BX trigger because its plastic, sounds like a moot point.

    I'm looking at the Hawke 4x32 AO mil and the 2x7 AO mil, any real advantage to either?
     
  10. mac66

    mac66 Huge Member Millennium Member

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    If you're looking for a affordable scope, the Simmons 22 Mag 3-9x is a good choice. I have a couple of them.
     
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  11. Borg Warner

    Borg Warner

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    You can upgrade your original trigger and retain the metal trigger housing by installing an EA Brown Hammer and sear package. I bought one of these packages about 5 years ago when it was less expensive and had a gunsmith install it for me who didn't charge me much money.

    A better trigger is the best upgrade to the 10-22 that can be done. It really makes a difference.

    Aftermarket barrels are nice, but if you go to a .920 diameter barrel then you have to go to an aftermarket stock except with the Charger which aklready has a taperd bull barrel and a free floated stock. The Bentz chambers improve accuracy. I like the Nikon Prostaff BDC rimfire scope for the 10-22.

    https://www.eabco.net/Ruger-1022-Hammer-and-Sear-Pkg_p_13376.html
    https://www.nikonsportoptics.com/en...copes/prostaff-rimfire-ii-3-9x40-bdc-150.html
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2020
  12. pblanc

    pblanc

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    As I said, I have both the Hawke Vantage 4x32 AO mil-dot and the Hawke Vantage 3-9x40 AO mil-dot mounted on different Ruger 10/22 rifles. I have not used the Hawke Vantage 2-7x32 AO mil-dot, but judging from the two I do have I think I have a pretty good idea of what it would be like. The glass clarity of both of these scopes is quite good and the adjustable objective works very well. I have no reason to believe the same would not be true for the Vantage 2-7x32 AO.

    A scope with a 32 mm diameter objective can usually be mounted slightly lower than one with a 40 mm objective. The difference is not great but you might be able to get a little better cheek weld with a lower mounted scope. The 4x fixed magnification scope is a little lighter and less complex, although the difference in size is not great.

    The advantage of a 2-7x or 3-9x variable magnification scope is obviously greater magnification if you should need it. Whether or not you would benefit from magnification greater than 4x will depend a lot on how you plan to use the rifle and your visual acuity. I have used both of these scopes to shoot at Project Appleseed events which involves three position target shooting at 25 meters using targets scaled in size so as to simulate Army "D" head and shoulders silhouette targets as they would appear placed at 100, 200, 300, and 400 yards.

    The 400 yard scaled targets are quite small and my score on the stages that use them is consistently a little better with 9x magnification than it is with 4x. But your eyes might be better than mine. It can also be an advantage to dial the zoom down when you don't need it. Too much magnification increases the apparent magnitude of a shooter's wobble, and may encourage some to tense up or try to "snatch" the shot, both of which diminish accuracy.

    I think for most shooters a variable magnification scope offers a bit more versatility than a fixed power scope. Either a 2-7x or a 3-9x magnification range is a good choice for most 22lr shooters. Precision target shooters and steel silhouette shooters may benefit from a greater degree of magnification.
     
  13. MajorD

    MajorD

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    Watched another shooter struggle with his ao scope at a recent NRL22 match. Side focus is the way to go. Several shooters use modified 10/22’s very effectively. We will often have courses of fire at very small targets from 25 to 100 yards with a lot of changing distances ( for example hit target at 25 twice then 75 twice then 25 twice then 100 twice then 50 twice, requiring adjustment every time of focus and elevation ( or use of a Christmas tree type reticle) check out Athlon first focal plane scopes. Very effective and not expensive. Christmas tree works but you have to test with your ammo to get the dope. Bdc’s Are ok for general plinking but are generally set up based on one type of ammo ( generally high velocity plinking and hunting ammo) and won’t always match based on what ammo might shooot best in your rifle
     
  14. B C

    B C

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  15. ede

    ede

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    You can get a flat trigger for the Ruger 9mm carbine and it'll fit and work with a BX trigger but it has a funny slant to it you may not like.
     
  16. R.B. Riddick

    R.B. Riddick

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    Whatever you decided to buy or upgrade, establish a budget first!

    10/22 builds can become expensive fast because you can easily replace almost every single on this rifle.
     
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  17. DAW9347

    DAW9347

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    This 10/22 has been set up to shoot CCI Quiet exclusively. The aluminum bolt is from Volquartsen, barrel is a Fedderson. With my suppressor mounted, all that is heard is the bolt hitting the bolt buffer:

    [​IMG]
     
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  18. Kentucky Shooter

    Kentucky Shooter NRA Life Member

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    I definitely agree- for an inexpensive option, I really like the Simmons .22mag series in both 3-9 and 4x. I do always ditch the rings that come with them in favor of something better. The screws in their rings seem awfully frail and brittle. I always seem to strip the Phillips heads with even a modest level of torque.
     
  19. mac66

    mac66 Huge Member Millennium Member

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    Absolutely, the rings that come with the 22 mag are junk.
     
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  20. Bilrus61

    Bilrus61

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    I'm a total unrepentant trigger snob. I've got Jewel trigger on my 700 clone. Anschutz 50.18 on my MSR. My ARs have Guisslie HSNM. There. The Kidd two stage trigger in my 10.22 is as good as ANY of those triggers, well maybe not the Anschutz 50.18. <----best trigger in the world. I know Kidd triggers are pricey but if you want some real WOW factor get one. Other triggers I had tried in the Ruger were "meh".
     
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