08:40 PM

Discussion in 'The 10 Ring' started by wabash, Jan 10, 2001.

  1. VN350X10

    VN350X10

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    I only use the coarse Kosher salt for my rubs, as I usually don't have normal salt in house. On the table, I use Morton Lite Salt, which is a 50/50 mix of salt & potassium chloride. Since most folks really don't get enough potassium in their diet, & I'm on dieuretics, I use it to make SURE I don't run low on potassium !
    The modification should get it back to what you want. Think of cooking as an edible(usually) chemistry experiment ;)
     
  2. MinervaDoe

    MinervaDoe

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    At this stage, I'm still diluting with sugar and remixing. It's likely that I just got a big clump of salt that wasn't stirred in.
    Potassium chloride VS sodium chloride. Who knew. Probably Mrs M. If I'm not mistaken, she banished the Morton Lite Salt.
    ..... I just checked. Mrs M. says the potassium has a weird taste to her.
    That's alright. I can use the same excuse to not eat sweet potatoes. No wait, sometimes I like those. I'll save it for something truly reprehensible and way too healthy.
     

  3. VN350X10

    VN350X10

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    She's right, to some people, it does taste "different". But I'd be willing to bet if you filled a salt shaker with it, she would use it and not notice. Especially with acidic foods like tomatoes.
    Just don't use it for canning or preserving, as THEN it will show up. Not harmful, but a distinct different taste than what's expected. And it will make dill pickles cloudy.
    As far as something that's foul but healthy, look no farther than kale. So do what I do, when you order it, just remember, the "k" is silent. :eat:Tastes MUCH better that way:drink:
     
  4. MinervaDoe

    MinervaDoe

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    Nope! I tried that years ago. I wasn't trying to be sneaky, but I bought some and refilled salt shakers with it. Busted. She could tell.
     
  5. VN350X10

    VN350X10

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    She might be one of the population that has an acute taste sensitivity to it. Most don't.



    Try the (k)ale.....
     
  6. MinervaDoe

    MinervaDoe

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    When I was a kid, my siblings and I all had the same reaction to eating artichokes and then taking a swig of milk. It tasted awful. As an adult, that has gone away. Do all kids have that reaction? My son didn't. I've never heard of anyone else experiencing it. Was it genetic? Maybe. Was it mom's cooking. You can never rule that one out.
     
  7. VN350X10

    VN350X10

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    Never had that problem, I loved milk & my mom hated artichokes. So they never appeared on the table. Same thing with dad & beets. In my case, it's eggplant !
     
  8. MinervaDoe

    MinervaDoe

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    I always hated eggplant until I had it on an official New York pizza. That changed me forever. I even folded the slice like the locals. Heaven.
     
  9. VN350X10

    VN350X10

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    I put it in with zuchinii.....in the compost pile !
    We won't even go into Chicago vs New York pizza
     
  10. MinervaDoe

    MinervaDoe

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    Zucchini is the main ingredient in a bunch of my recipes. That might be due to the fact that it is pronounced similar to my own name.
    But, mostly because it tastes good. Again, nature or nurture? Weird genes or weird food growing up?
     
  11. MinervaDoe

    MinervaDoe

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    I started the Steve Carell Get Smart movie. They've got the Sunbeam Tiger in a museum. I'm leaving it near the top of the queue. It seems like he'd have to drive it somehow. If you could somehow set it up so that it'd be hard to roll, you could probably do some fun movie stuff with it.
     
  12. VN350X10

    VN350X10

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    Tigers were interesting little cars. Given the 260/4bbl was about 220 hp, and the 289's were about 270 (slightly different cam than the 271 Hi-Po Mustang, really the same HP, more driveable because of less weight) they were a rocket. When Roots Group took over & they went to the 273 Mopar, which is heavier than the Fords, it became an ill-handling stone, because they only made about the same hp as the 260's, and more nose weight.
    Around corners, they did go, as the small block Fords were only about 25 lbs. heaver than the 1725 cc 4 cyl. in the Alpines !
    In S.C.C.A. competition, the 289's were permitted to add traction bars in production class, and a lot of guys figured out how to make them help with braking along with acceleration. They became a poor-mans 289 Cobra ! The B/Production 'Vette's never knew what hit them on shorter tracks.
    Anything of 2 miles or less was a Ford parade in most cases. On tracks with LONG straights, not so much.....
     
  13. MinervaDoe

    MinervaDoe

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    This is kind of fun.
     
  14. VN350X10

    VN350X10

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    The coolest thing is that Leno DRIVES everything in his collection....
    Trailer queens they are NOT !
    Really surprised this one isn't his.
     
  15. MinervaDoe

    MinervaDoe

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    The car club guy mentioned that there were many people looking to sell. Who wouldn't want to sell to Jay Leno. He can afford to pay what the car is worth and the car will be well cared for.
     
  16. VN350X10

    VN350X10

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    By the time Leno's mechanics are done with it, "Better than New" ISN'T just a figure of speech !

    ;) :) ;)
     
  17. MinervaDoe

    MinervaDoe

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    In 1966, the average yearly salary was around $4,400. :alex:
    The price of a regular mustang fastback was $2,713. That's a $1,700 mark up. What did that include for the basic Shelby GT 350 package.
     
  18. VN350X10

    VN350X10

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    In 1966, all you had to do to a GT-350 was put on numbers, tape headlights (was still allowed back then) climb into your drivers suit & helmet & GO.
    OEM tires were Goodyear Blue Streaks (non-DOT) & they came with 5-point belts for driver & passenger. You could run different side dumps for the exhaust,but really didn't need to, and an approved roll bar was std. equipment ! Oh yeah, forgot, add a fire extinguisher, as most got "lost" during delivery.
    If you were really in it, a GT-350 R had no front bumper, replaced with a fiberglass panel that had a scoop for the oil cooler, but a lot of guys didn't spend the extra $$$ for an "R" model, and they were hard to come by, a lot fewer made.
    Or you went to Hertz & rented a GT-350H, drove it home & bolted in your roll bar. And when you took it back, you complained that they rented you a car with worn-out tires.:kidding:
     
  19. MinervaDoe

    MinervaDoe

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    You're quite smitten with the whole Shelby thing aren't you? Me too I guess. I didn't think they did much to the motor though. New intake? Headers? stock Hi Po 289 cam? Same heads that run out of steam at 4,800 RPMs due to a strangulated exhaust port?
     
  20. VN350X10

    VN350X10

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    GT-350's were rated @ 306 hp, the GT-350 R was rated @ 348(depends on source,some claimed 355) and a 289 prepped w/4 Weber 48 IDA's was good for about 390 hp. Revving a 289 to 7000 rpm was about normal for racing, some ran as high as 7800 rpm. The Shelby's had a different intake manifold than a 289 Hi-Po, and their own brand of Tri-Wye headers, so even with the same cam, they had more cajones. Also, Holley carbs worked better than did the Ford factory units. And set up for racing, the "600 CFM" Holleys can be made to flow around 720 cfm.
    There were also a lot of experiments with rocker arm ratios, getting more lift, and cam profiles, getting more EFFECTIVE duration. A valve really doesn't "open" to airflow until it's about .050" off the seat. Lobe shape plays a big part, even if two cams have the same lift & duration numbers. Think 6'8"NBA player vs 6'8" NFL player....