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    1. · Scottish Member
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      15,293 Posts
      Hardened Arms in Washington State has some reasonable prices and they run "specials" every so often. I think they also have integral suppression as well. But I'd rather go SBR and a separate suppressor. It is going to cost $200 more and another Form 4, but it will be a lot more flexible. You can have a SBR with multiple short barrel uppers/calibers, you can put the suppressor on a variety of firearms and you have a great variety of suppressors to chose from.

      Their uppers go on gun broker for $225-$245.

      The subsonic .300 blackout is "optimized" for about a 9-1/2" barrel (IIRC), so going longer only helps you if you want a rifle and want to avoid NFA requirements. For supersonic, like 110-125 grain, the longer barrel will help quite a bit in velocity.

      If you want to shoot subsonic primarily, I'd really consider a 9mm. Reloading the 9mm is quick, easy and cheap - and 9mm brass is probably the plentiful around. Good SD/HD ammunition for the 9mm is relatively cheap and readily available - and a SD/HD 9mm (like +p and +p+) will likely benefit from a longer barrel (8-1/4" to 16"). Since the 9mm is blowback, it is going to run a lot cleaner with a suppressor unless you have a piston upper ($$) for the .300.

      .300 blackout loaded ammunition is fairly expensive. Sure, .223/5.56 brass is plentiful, but conversion to .300 is rather time consuming and a little costly to set up initially (I used a harbor freight cut off saw, a squirrel daddy jig, Lee dies and a giraud trimmer) . Then you've got to find 1680 or H110 powder (hard to find these days) and pay for some 190-240 gr .308 bullets (certainly not cheap). You can shoot polymer coated lead without a suppressor, but suppressors don't like the coating (at least according to Silencerco). You will want to use the Lee "factory crimp" die, to insure that the bullet (loaded to near max OAL) doesn't back out at all.

      The .300 will give better retained velocity at longer ranges than a 9mm, but there is definitely some experimentation with bullet weight, accuracy and stability for the .300. In my 1:8 barrel, the shorter bullets are definitely more accurate.

      http://www.giraudtool.com/Tri Way Trimmer.htm

      http://www.squirreldaddy.com/Rigid-Brass-300-Blackout-Case-Trimming-Jig-2-0-p/sd24-105.htm

      http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/cut-off-saws/2-in-mini-bench-top-cut-off-saw-62136.html

      You can get a Octane 45 and use it on 9mm, .40, .45 and .300 subsonic - in a user serviceable suppressor. If you go supersonic in a rifle, you are going to need a beefier can.

      I've started down the .300 blackout road, and kinda wish I'd considered the 9mm more now.
       
    1. · Scottish Member
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      15,293 Posts
      Yeah. I'm looking to get in dies etc.
      Making .300 AAC cases (from .223) was a bit more tedious than I counted on. If you are hunting (ie. not shooting a lot) it is not too bad. Plinking + 3 gun however, you don't want to lose the cases you worked to make.

      I used the harbor freight cut-off saw:


      The squirrel daddy jig:


      The Giraud Tri Way Trimmer

      ===============

      In my opinion, If you are wanting a sub-sonic suppressed gun, a PCC/PC-SBR is a lot more practical. The .300 AAC is a lot more trouble and a lot more expensive (if you don't cast your own bullets).

      If you want a relatively short range .30 cal hunting upper, it is a pretty good choice.

       
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