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Article 25 Cent Glock Trigger Job

By Klaatu, Aug 10, 2017 | | |
  1. Klaatu
    Since purchasing a Glock 19 Gen 3 back in 2008, I've read articles and watched videos on modifications and accessories but none intrigued me more than the 25 Cent Trigger Job. It was only last year that I finally did it because I had almost everything needed to perform it and because it doesn't require any special skills beyond patience and desire.

    I'm not a gunsmith, only a Glock enthusiast so what follows is what was common among all the resources I found on the procedure. Special thanks to Humans4Targets' YouTube video. He made it look easy.

    Preparation

    There are four parts to be polished in specific spots but in no particular order: safety plunger, connector, trigger bar, and the striker tail. Some also recommend polishing the slide rails so I did those too. I hand-polished the parts instead of using a Dremel tool because you don't want to cut or wear away any metal. That's especially important regarding polishing the inside ledge of the striker tail. Avoid bending or reshaping any factory parts.
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    Supplies needed are:

    metal polish

    cotton swabs

    a 3/32" pin punch

    clean rag

    I used Mothers Mag & Aluminum Polish, Q-tips, and a Sears Craftsman 4" punch.

    Procedure


    Detail strip


    The parts to be polished are accessed through detail stripping which is a complete disassembly of both the upper (slide) and the lower (receiver). The only tool needed besides possibly a 3/32" flathead (slotted) screwdriver to remove the connector from the trigger group, is the pin punch. Detail stripping has been addressed often in the GlockTalk Forum. In addition, a step-by-step guide can be found on GlockParts.com.

    Polish parts

    Start with the safety plunger. Dip the tip of the cotton swab into the polishing compound and rub the flat bottom of the plunger to remove deposits. Buff to a sheen with the rag.

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    Next do the connector. After applying compound to the swab's tip, rub from the inside of the lip to about half-way down the bar. Doing the whole bar to the curved end is apparently okay also but unnecessary. Buff to a sheen with the rag.

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    Now do the trigger bar at specific points.

    1) Inside the trigger bar to the edge
    2) The outside of the upward-curving top wing on the cruciform sear plate that the striker moves on. Doing the whole cross is apparently okay but is also unnecessary, and finally
    3) The top edge of the safety plunger pusher.

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    Next, polish the inside ledge (face) of the striker tail only up to the top corner. Rolling the corner has consequences best explained elsewhere.

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    Finally, polish the slide rails (optional).

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    That’s it!

    Conclusion


    After reassembly and factory recommended lubrication, the trigger action felt smoother and lighter and I felt a sense of accomplishment.


    Some claim the trigger job reduces pull weight but because I don’t have a gauge, I can’t verify that. A surer way to reduce trigger pull is to replace the stock connector with a 3.5 lb. aftermarket connector like the Ghost Ultimate connector pictured above, and a stronger trigger spring.


    Expect to spend 1-2 hours on the project, depending on your knowledge and experience.

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Comments

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  1. BerKut
    I have done this on my 26 & 30s, and switched out both connectors with the double diamond. I felt a much smother trigger pull.
      Rick Longobardi likes this.
  2. FL Airedale
    Good write up. I have 5 Glocks and I've only done the trigger job with one. My G26 Gen 4 had a hitch in the trigger pull. Sometimes it was snagging before the trigger broke. When I did the trigger job, I could feel a burr on the connector. Using a magnifying glass, I could actually see it. It took the extra time to make sure that was smoothed out and the G26 trigger doesn't give me anymore problems.
      Rick Longobardi likes this.
  3. rangerparked
    Did my G19 3rd gen yesterday. Very nice and smooth,...many thnaks. Gonna change the trigger to the smooth face soon.
      Rick Longobardi likes this.
  4. Dogi
    Thank you. I polished my G17's internals yesterday with Dremel and Autosol Metal Polish. First with Felt Polishing Wheel and then with Cloth Polishing Wheel. Feels smooth, although polishing didn't effect the trigger pull weight that much: 2160 g (4.762 lb) before, 2130 g (4.696 lb) after. FYI, the gun has minus connector, and has few thousand rounds through it, so it had pretty much smoothened itself already.
  5. Mr. McQ
    I hate autocorrect "dremel" not Drexel!!!!
  6. Mr. McQ
    I did this to my new Gen4 17, after about 500 rounds. I used a portable Drexel with a really light touch. Didn't get quite mirror finish, but distinctly smoother and shinier than the surrounding surfaces. It made an appreciable difference in feel, especially for left hand shooting, where it eliminated some of my jerkiness.
  7. Michael Bolt-On
    Nice write up. I like to chuck up the plunger into my 18v drill and break the hard angle on the side's transition to the radius with some various grits of sand paper.
  8. NavyVet1959
    The phrase "polishing a turd" comes to mind. :)

    Glocks have certain advantages, but their trigger will never be one of them. You can spend a lot of money of a Glock and you won't have a trigger as good as even the most budget-level M1911.
    1. Klaatu
      Maybe the new Gen 5 trigger will be more to your liking.
  9. judgecrater
    Using a Dremel tool carefully and properly makes the job so much faster and easier.
      Walk Soft likes this.
  10. AZson
    When I did mine I put a little Gun Juice in the areas I polished, heated them like the instructions says and put more gun Juice. They slide like butter now.
      TexasGlock20 and danmac like this.
    1. RJMiz
      Found your mention of Gun Juice with great interest. I'll be doing more research on the topic. Thanks,