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WWII 1911 questions

Discussion in '1911 Forums' started by pm666, Dec 27, 2010.

  1. pm666

    pm666

    632
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    Feb 28, 2009
    Is it possible to buy a WWII 1911 or are they very rare? I had an early Kimber 1911 which was unreliable and I sold it. I would like to have an authentic WWII 1911 if it was reliable and not worn out, but I don't know if they exist and for how much money. It would be a range gun as I have a Glock 21sf that is my home defense gun, but I don't want the 1911 in for repairs all the time either. I dout if I'd want to pay $1k for used WWII 1911 either. I've searched for WWII 1911's but haven't had much luck, I think I am searching in the wrong places or something.
    I'm also concerned about getting ripped off because I wouldn't know how to tell an authentic WWII 1911 from one that isn't authentic.
    Any suggestions are appreciated.

    Thanks,
    paul
     
  2. Quack

    Quack Rent this space

    9,991
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    Jan 7, 2002
    NE Ohio
    they exist, but for a nice one, it'll be more than $1000
     


  3. Hokie1911

    Hokie1911 >

    9,712
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    Dec 26, 2003
    NE Ohio
    Bac posted a link a while back about a really nice looking oldschool GI replica. I don't remember who it was, and they ran $1,800 I think, but they looked excellent. He spoke very highly of them.
     
  4. polizei1

    polizei1 It WAS Quack

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    Feb 3, 2009
    Cincinnati, OH
    If you're not looking to spend over $1k, I'd look at a modern 1911 or even a GI replica. SA makes a GI and Remington has the R1. But are around $600 I believe...or you could just get a modern 1911 for ~$1k. and it will be reliable. I would look into the SA RO, it seems to be getting some really nice reviews.
     
  5. pm666

    pm666

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    Feb 28, 2009
    Wow...I could afford the $1k+, but is just doesn't have that much value to me. Heck, a few $ more and I could get a low end Wilson Combat. The only appeal to me is the authenticity of a WWII 1911. Same goes for my SAA that I've wanted, not interested in affording a 1st Generation and even the 2nd Generations are expensive. The weird sights on the 3rd Generation aren't "Old West" sights, so forget that. I guess I'll look to buy another Glock.
    Thanks for the info...you guys know your stuff!
    Paul
     
  6. I paid $1500 for my colt and it is worth at least $300 more
     
  7. jrs93accord

    jrs93accord

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    Jul 10, 2005
    Pensacola, FL
    [​IMG]

    1919 Colt 1911 ($1800), 1943 Ithaca 1911A1- reparked ($900), 1944 Remington Rand ($1500).
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2010
  8. jrs93accord

    jrs93accord

    6,150
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    Pensacola, FL
    Cimarron Arms has a nice 1911 version (around $599).

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    and there is also the IAC Regent (around $425)

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Quack

    Quack Rent this space

    9,991
    9
    Jan 7, 2002
    NE Ohio
    don't let the Kimber experience think that the 1911 is a bad platform.
     
  10. MrMurphy

    MrMurphy ********* Moderator Moderator Millennium Member Lifetime Member

    12,972
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    Jan 16, 2001
    Buried in the X-files
    Finding one in original condition will be the problem, a lot were postwar modified.

    For a WW2-range gun, simply get a Springfield GI. No, it's not a "real" WW2 piece but for $500ish you can shoot it all you want and not worry about it. High Standard and others make similar WW2 clones.
     
  11. If you did get an actual WWII 1911 with all of the proper parts in it I would hesitate to use it as a range gun.
    Sure you could shoot it all day long as long as you use normal powered FMJ ammunition.
    But, if it ever breaks a part and you have to replace it the value of your gun goes down.
    Most people who get older 1911's simply keep them as a collectors item.
    There are many good cheap 1911's in the 600 dollar range that make good range guns.
    You can beat the crap out of em and replace parts all you want and the value doesn't matter.
    I like the Springfield Armory Mil-Specs as a basic beater 1911.
     
  12. pm666

    pm666

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    Feb 28, 2009
    You guys have a lot of good points and knowledge. I'm glad I posted here. I kind of see where you are coming and what you are telling me. My authentic WWII 1911 would have to be a "Colt", but it would not have to be 100% original parts or anything like that. It would see some range use, but not extensive. I guess in my mind, the thought that this is what the soldiers in WWII were actually using is what makes me want that WWII Colt 1911. I hope that isn't weird. I watch WWII movies and reruns of Combat! - damn, all that gear/uniform/helmet was so damn heavy!
    My first gun was that Kimber 1911, some of the metal felt like pot metal. I did not grow up with guns nor was I in the armed forces, etc. That Kimber was defective from day one - one press of the trigger and it would fire 2-3 round bursts with burning metal/powder flying out of the ejection port and sometimes hitting my hand. At first I thought I was doing something wrong. I told the guy at the gun shop where I bought about it and he wanted to try it...he did and got a hot glowing ember of something on his hand and it burnt him pretty good. He was mad at me, but I told him that's what it did. He sent it back to Kimber and supposedly it was a mainspring (the one behind the backstrap). I still never trusted it and Kimber is a girl's name...not sure why someone would name a gun mfr company "Kimber". Also, due to limited training time, I never knew when the safety was on or off unless I looked at it. I can't tell you how many times I thought it was ready to fire until I pulled the trigger and found out the safety was on. I traded it for a SIG P220 which was better, but then I wasn't thrilled with the DA/SA. Years later, I recently sold it and got a Glock 21sf and for the most part all I have to think about is keeping my finger off of the trigger until I'm ready fire, keep it pointed downrange, don't try to catch it if it falls out of my hand for some reason, etc. It works much better at least for me anyway as a home defense gun.
    Regardless, I don't know where all the Colt WWII 1911's went, there must have hundreds of thousands of them and WWII wasn't THAT long ago. There are probably millions of them stored and lost in some government warehouse somewhere. Sorry for rambling.
     
  13. craig19

    craig19

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    NE Ohio
    I think Kimber is the guy's last name.

    I'm pretty sure Uncle Sam either destroyed or gave them to 3rd world hell holes to help fight the commies.
     
  14. Quack

    Quack Rent this space

    9,991
    9
    Jan 7, 2002
    NE Ohio
    nope,

    Jerico is an acronym for "Jerry and Richard's Company." Jerry Roman and Richard Brown
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2010
  15. craig19

    craig19

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    Aug 13, 2010
    NE Ohio
    Thanks Quack, that company sounds like a mess.
     
  16. jrs93accord

    jrs93accord

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    Pensacola, FL
    A WWII 1911A1 would not necessarily be a Colt. They were also made by Remington Rand, Ithaca, Singer, and Union, Switch & Signal. There are many parts guns out there that can be bought for a lot less. A parts gun is one that may have a Colt slide and Remington Rand frame or a Remington Rand slide over a Colt frame, etc. This usually occurs when the armory gets in a mass of pistols and they try to rework as many as they can to keep them in service. All the good parts are used to re-assemble a complete working pistol. That is how they get mis-matched.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2010
  17. craig19

    craig19

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    Aug 13, 2010
    NE Ohio

    How much do you think a mismatch would go for?
     
  18. jrs93accord

    jrs93accord

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    Depending on condition and the combination, $500-$1500. Union, Switch & Signal and Singer are the rarest and will command higher prices. Colt, Remington Rand, and Ithaca are the most common you come across. The real value is what you place on it. I paid $1800 for my original 1919 Colt 1911. It was worth every penny. The guy I bought it from saved it from being modified by its previous owner. The gun originally belonged to the soldier who carried it in WWII. History is priceless.
     
  19. Hokie1911

    Hokie1911 >

    9,712
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    NE Ohio
    Hey James, do remember who that GI replica Brian posted a while back? They were $1,800ish.

    Those Singer prices are outrageous.