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Would you know how to help someone who is having a heart attack? Take a

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by lethal tupperwa, Aug 16, 2012.

  1. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    Subj: Watch Heart Rescue Video


    Would you know how to help someone who is having a heart attack? Take a minute to watch this video.


    IMPORTANT Watch This!


    Tastefully done; step by step way one might be able to save a life. Well worth the watch!!


    I Just watched this video

    it'll save lives (maybe mine, yours )

    http://www.heartrescuenow.com/
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2012
  2. quantum36

    quantum36

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  3. ColdSteelNail

    ColdSteelNail

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    Thanks for posting this. I hope everyone views it.
     
  4. jason10mm

    jason10mm NRA-GOA-TSRA

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    Meh, all that video really does is tell you to use an AED. At least the choice train I picked had the guy starting chest compressions without verifying a pulse. No mouth to mouth at all, which is probably realistic, but without some training most folks will not perform an effective chest compression (if you are not pressing hard enough to snap ribs or fast enough to work up a sweat, you are not doing it right) so they are better off just letting the AED do all the work.

    Quite frankly, given the scenario (middle-aged fit guy found down) the efficacy of CPR is pretty poor and survivability is low.
     
  5. jrpro130

    jrpro130

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    I'm a firefighter/paramedic for a busy city...let me tell you, survivability is exponentially higher with trained lay rescuer CPR.

    It's a training video, so of course the CPR is going to look shotty...given the real circumstances, which I have seen many, MOST people go too hard and too fast on compressions, which again equals inadequate CPR.

    I'm a CPR instructor and I can't say I know all, but we teach the ACLS guidelines and lay rescuer CPR weekly.

    With all that said, the NEW current CPR guidelines are an emphasis on compressions ONLY, with no pause. The AHA (American heart association) now DE-emphasises the use of rescue breaths in lay rescuer. It is proven to be more effective to do adequate CPR because during the first 2-4 minutes there is enough oxygen in the lungs to provide oxygen to the vital organs.

    Also, exhaled breath from a human is approx 16% oxygen. In most cases this is not as important as ADEQUATE lay/trained rescuer CPR.

    The biggest problem we see is people who do nothing. Doing anything is better than nothing. We have the greatest survival rate with lay rescuer EARLY cpr and activation of the 911 system.

    For my medical people,
    We actually just had a save 2 shifts ago, person on the golf course went down, went into V-Tach without a pulse, his buddy did CPR per dispatch instructions, we got there shocked at 200 J, went into PEA for 1 round, then got a pulse back, hung Amiodarone 150mg/50 D5W drip and by the time we arrived at the hospital he was responding to voice. We didn't even have time to intubate, I was just getting set up and we had a rythm change and pulses back!

    Also, current CPR guidelines are to start CPR immediately, tell someone to get an AED, and tell someone to call 911. Not call 911 yourself, like in the video. The emphasis is on EARLY activation of 911 and adequate compressions.
     
  6. Berto

    Berto woo woo

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    It looked like the guy blew his aorta.
     
  7. Lone Wolf8634

    Lone Wolf8634 :):

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    The training they provide us at work has pretty much done away with mouth to mouth if you are performing CPR alone.

    And no, they weren't performing the chest compressions correctly, but since the man down was an actor, and, like you said, properly done, chest compressions may actually cause an injury, I think we can cut 'em some slack.

    Those AED's are pretty nifty though, we had to learn to use those also.
     
  8. NeverMore1701

    NeverMore1701 Fear no Evil Platinum Member

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    Assuming no pulse, chest compressions until fire arrives with an AED and BVM, more compressions until my friends show up with drugs and a cot.
     
  9. jrpro130

    jrpro130

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    I'm sorry, I have to disagree GREATLY here...you did pick the right path in that you don't check a pulse and no ventilations.

    The guidelines for CPR for a person down, unresponsive, not breathing now are NO PULSE CHECK, NO MOUTH TO MOUTH (or a de-emphasis of mouth to mouth I should say), and 100/MIN compressions.

    With that said,

    CPR isn't rocket science, anyone can do it. Adequate CPR is hard and fast, 2" depth, 100/min rate.

    I disagree with you that survivability is low. Infact survivability is HIGH with EARLY CPR and activation of 911 system with a middle aged FIT male down. Most commonly people will assume M.I. (heart attack) which could have lead to a lethal cardiac rhythm. Since the AED advised shock he is in ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia, so survivability is VERY HIGH. It may have advised no shock if he indeed had a pulse but coulnd't feel it, or PEA/asystole (no shock advised)

    Survivability is low when the person is in asystole, but a fit male in his mid 40's/50's has a HIGH rate of survival and actually high rate of full recovery.

    I would say if the scenario was a 91 year old lady with multiple medical conditions was FOUND down...then we are talking LOW LOW LOW survivability.

    Please, I don't mean any offense, I just get a little riled up when people say these things. I don't know if you are a trained professional or not.
     
  10. ColdSteelNail

    ColdSteelNail

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    Very informative. I greatly appreciate the job you do.
     
  11. Ragnar

    Ragnar

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    Umm, go thru his pockets?
     
  12. jason10mm

    jason10mm NRA-GOA-TSRA

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    Disagree if you want, but look at the statistics (such as they are).

    http://www.theheart.org/article/1067791.do

    http://blogs.nejm.org/now/index.php...gs-versus-home-ml-weisfeldt-et-al/2011/01/27/

    http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/167498...+out-of-hospital+'sudden'+cardiac+arrest..pdf

    2% for folks getting nothing. 7% survival for folks getting CPR, 24% with an AED (34-38% if there was an arrythmia that could be treated with a shock). That is LOW. The AED is pretty much the only real option, which is my point. CPR itself is a long shot.
     
  13. schild

    schild

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    That's tacky, just take his watch...................:tongueout:





    Oh, and thanks for the video.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2012
  14. NDCent

    NDCent Socially Inept

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    No pulse check before starting compressions? That's a new one on me.
     
  15. NeverMore1701

    NeverMore1701 Fear no Evil Platinum Member

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    Lots of people can't find a strong pulse on a healthy person without practice, the reasoning is they don't want people wasting time poking someone's neck for 30 seconds.
     
  16. Ian Moone

    Ian Moone

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    The video left out the final chapter ...taking the asian chick for a few drinks and other post-traumatic experience decompression. :whistling:
     
  17. huskerbuttons

    huskerbuttons

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    In my response area, 2mg of Narcan IM or with a Nasal Atomizer would have this guy up and talking in 3 minutes, wanting to sign a refusal.
     
  18. DrMaxit

    DrMaxit Dirtbag Airman

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    :rofl: :rofl: True!

    Great video OP. I shared it on my FB page also. I know a bunch of people, including myself, have seen those AEDs around and had no real clue as to how to use one. Thanks for sharing.
     
  19. INJoker

    INJoker Simply Charming

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    Open carry would have prevented that.
     
  20. Brucev

    Brucev

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    Good post. Helpful video. Very useful for normal people whose everyday routine is anything other than medical, etc.