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What's up with S&B 9mm brass?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Kwesi, Nov 3, 2010.

  1. Kwesi

    Kwesi

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    Sep 23, 2006
    TX
    I must have picked these up at my range. I had a few, but not all, fall down inside my case gauge as you'd expect a .380 but they are stamped 9mm?
     
  2. ron59

    ron59 Bustin Caps

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    Jan 3, 2009
    Smyrna, GA
    What do you mean "fall down inside the case gauge" ?

    Are you case gauging empty brass ?

    Is it a piece of reloaded ammo that is going further into the case gauge than you expect it would? Because... guess what, if it's doing that, that's how far it's SUPPOSED TO FALL. The 9mm cartridge headspaces on the case rim, not the base. You can put a 9mm cartridge in the gauge upside down (base first) and it will go inside the hole.

    That was something I didn't realize at first myself. But a properly resized and loaded 9mm round, the base of the cartridge will actually be slightly BELOW the surface of the gauge.
     


  3. jsnake

    jsnake

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    Jun 9, 2009
    you sure it doesn't say "9mm br.", which is 380?
    Joe
     
  4. Kwesi

    Kwesi

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    Sep 23, 2006
    TX
    These are reloaded, not empty brass. I have probably reloaded 8-10,000 rounds without seeing this. The round is about 1/8" inside the gauge! I had a few .380 pieces slip thru & get reloaded with 115gr tips & when you case gauge both rounds they BOTH fall down into the gauge.
     
  5. Kwesi

    Kwesi

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    Sep 23, 2006
    TX
    Joe you are right on! It's great to learn something new...thank you!
     
  6. Bob2223

    Bob2223 Jack's buddy!

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    Mar 26, 2009
    Spencer Indiana
    Thats why I've never owned a case gage, afraid I would find too many problems.
    I treat my reloads like a Postal flat rate box,,
    If it fits it ships!

    :supergrin:

    Bob
     
  7. Kwesi

    Kwesi

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    Sep 23, 2006
    TX
    Why doesn't S&B just stamp it .380? Any other manufactures utilize this designation?
     
  8. jmorris

    jmorris

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    Apr 13, 2006
    FWIW get out a magnent, a lot of 9mm S&B brass is just plated steel.
     
  9. Kwesi

    Kwesi

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    Sep 23, 2006
    TX
    Thanks! That would be a quick way to weed them out.
     
  10. jsnake

    jsnake

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    Jun 9, 2009
    No worries. Had this problem myself. You will also see 380 brass stamped 9x18.
    Joe
     
  11. grenadier

    grenadier

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    May 4, 2000
    Alabama
    Shouldn't this be 9x17? IIRC, 9x18 is only used for two cartridges, the 9 mm Ultra, and the 9 mm Makarov.
     
  12. jsnake

    jsnake

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    Jun 9, 2009
    True,
    Sorry, I meant 9x17. Thanks for catching it.
    joe
     
  13. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    Nov 2, 2006
    CO
    Not trying to be mean/harsh. I just don't know how else to say this. You need to pay better attention when you are loading. You should have noticed the minute you pulled the handle on that 380 case that it wasn't right. It would have been noticably easier to pull the handle on that brass. The minute you feel things not right you need to stop and find out why. That is a good reason to never size a small batch of case seperately and just throw them in with the unsized stuff that you plan to load. You will train yourself to ignore those "easy to size" cases. Then the bad stuff can slip through. Those 380 cases are not sized. So the bullets are not being held in very well. Don't assume that they won't fire in the 9mm. The very well could. I fired a 9mm in a 10mm gun. 380 is pretty close to 9mm. You could also easily have bulet setback and ou already have a much smaller case so it would be a very bad thing if that happened.
     
  14. There's also 9mm(M) for Makarov. Sneaky buggers. I've found anything before the date code '10' is usually steel. But not always. Sometimes.
     
  15. dudel

    dudel

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    Texas Hill Country
    Plus the likely won't headspace correctly or seal in the chamber properly. Breechface and gun will take a beating with those rounds in there.

    OP needs to check his brass a little more carefully. Spot on about learning the feel of the press/round. Something doesn't feel right stop and figure out what's wrong. It's a whole lot easier while there are 4/5 rounds in the press than 1000 rounds in the bin.
     
  16. Kwesi

    Kwesi

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    Sep 23, 2006
    TX
    You are absolutely right, advice taken. I do realize the seriousness on loading that .380 especially since I shoot mostly full auto.

    It just so happened that I used Hornandy spray lube on that batch at the urging of Murphy's Law, and associated the ease of the handle due to the lube.

    I submit myself to the mentoring of you and all the members that know a heck of a lot more than me. Please keep the corrections coming when I need them!

    I always run every round thru my case gauge as a final safety net.
     
  17. GioaJack

    GioaJack Conifer Jack

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    Apr 14, 2009
    Conifer, CO
    The smartest and safest thing you could do as you travel the path of your loading career is to stop taking advice from anyone called, 'Murphy's Law'. :whistling:

    That's like asking me for marriage advice... it's not going to end well.


    Jack
     
  18. jmorris

    jmorris

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    That does the trick alright. I case gauge all of my competition ammo but with the brass sorters and case prep equipment I have, I don't bother with my machine gun ammo.