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What was I suposed to do again

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by misunderestimated, Jun 15, 2012.

  1. misunderestimated

    misunderestimated

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    So while I was waiting to shoot the plates in Orlando I was talking to a person and they explained something and I completely forgot what they said,but when I did it in Orlando it helped me on the plates. I start in a compressed ready.Meaning arms parallel with ground and elbows toughing my sides

    where am I supposed to be looking? If I look at target its hard for me to come off the target and then get on my sights.If i look at ground I have to hunt for sights then target. What ever it was it was so simple and it worked I just did not practice it to make it a memory .

    Of course I am leaving for a match tomorow morning and wish I woul have remembered this little tid bit.
     
  2. gravitybad

    gravitybad

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    My take on your question is that you should not take your eyes off the target...bring the sights to the target.

    My technique for plates or any other draw is to look at the target and bring the sights to the plate. With practice this motion should become instinctive, bringing the sights to the target with less and less sight adjustment needed before breaking the shot. One other thing i do is to prep the trigger as I'm drawing. My goal to is start the draw 'before' the beep ends, prep the trigger while drawing, and break the shot right as my arms are at full extension which should be right when the sights are on target.

    A steady diet of dry fire...say as little as 5-10 minutes a night...and you'll be amazed how quickly you can improve your 1st shot accuracy and time.

    Hope you find what works for you.....Good luck with the match!


    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3RYnSWynDQ&feature=plcp"]GSSF - GLOCK THE PLATES (12.26s) - YouTube[/ame]
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2012

  3. misunderestimated

    misunderestimated

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    Thank you ,that's probably it. Too bad it wasn't as simple as that video makes it look . Great shooting .
     
  4. gravitybad

    gravitybad

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    I am a huge advocate of dry fire practice which helps muscle memory, especially in the timed draw and transitions. Since moving to GA, I haven't had an opportunity to get the range as often as I would like. Dry fire has always accounted for 99% of the time a gun is in my hand. I practice with cut out cardboard 1/3 scale targets and shoot from a scaled distance in the garage, office, etc. It can get monotonous and boring, but i think it doesn't take much more than a few minutes a day as long as you're consistent and honest with yourself on whether you hit where you are aiming and not cheating yourself by going too fast. Put in the work and it will pay off.

    Hopefully, my point came across that i try to eliminate any unnecessary movement; the body, the head, muscle tension, eyes anywhere other than the target, etc
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2012
  5. ron59

    ron59 Bustin Caps

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    From the compressed position, I still hold the gun as absolutely high as I can. On the beep, raise it to in front of your face, THEN push out. Don't bring it up slowly as you're going out, the sights won't be aligned until your arms are fully extended.

    Focus on the target. When the gun gets in front of your eyes and as you start extending your arms, your eyes have time to find your sights and start focusing on them.

    I've just recently started doing this better when drawing from the holster, using a timer with live fire. My time to first shot is quicker and more accurate. I'm definitely bringing the gun **UP** further in front of my body before extending my arms out. I'm find the sights quicker, I'm having time to "fine tune" as my arms are extending. It feels smoother and faster.

    I believe I've read that you look at the target, and right as you think the buzzer is about to sound, you slightly cross your eyes? That defocuses your eyes, and changes them from the distant vision of looking at the target, to being ready to adust to the near vision of focusing on your sights. But you're still looking in the direction of that first plate.
     
  6. gravitybad

    gravitybad

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    Good explanation on technique, especially the part about bringing the gun up quickly and start to transition focus as you extend your arms to the target.

    I tried this 'defocus' thing and ...wow... was it disorienting! I'm sure this may work as long as it is how you train. Transition focusing is definitely an acquired skill and still feel the best way train for this is through dry fire repetition, regardless of what focus method you choose. Start slow, deliberate, and accurate motions which build the fundemental mechanics of the motion and then gradually increase speed with each practice session. Incorporate a timer...rinse and repeat.

    I notice, with much frustration, when i stop dry fire practice for any length of time, I have to force myself to focus from the target to the sight. Many times my focus ends up somewhere in between the target and the sight. Its tough to train that type of commitment and i struggle with it all the time.

    Anybody else have any methods on focusing for a clean 1st hit?
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2012
  7. misunderestimated

    misunderestimated

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    Well the cross your eye thing is not for me.it strains my head and is really hard to refocus.
     
  8. ede

    ede Bama's Friend

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    for me I look at where I want the bullet to go, something Bama taught me. When I bring the gun up it feels like the sights find where I'm looking.
     
  9. PM720

    PM720

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    Going from your other Bama training sessions I thought the bullets pointed forward in the magazines? :whistling:

    :rofl::rofl: