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what video card to buy?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by jolt8me, Aug 4, 2008.

  1. jolt8me

    jolt8me Your the devil

    188
    0
    May 9, 2004
    Michigan
    This is what I have now.
    Dell dimension 8200
    1.7ghz pentium 400mhz fsb
    Nvidia geoforce 2 mx with 4x agp
    1024 mb's ram

    heres what I want. I play some older games like operation flashpoint and spring and do some graphics work. So I dont need a really high end video card, at this point im just want to be able to play things a lot smoother with a bit more eye candy.

    Heres what I have been looking at http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1458679&CatId=318

    yes/no or is there something better around the same price?
     
  2. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

    25,790
    1,052
    Jan 26, 2001
    Indiana

  3. NetNinja

    NetNinja Always Faithful

    967
    0
    Oct 23, 2001
    HotLanta, GA
    I know you may not have the money for a new machine but consider getting yourself a PCI express motherboard.

    Of course that means memory, new processor and graphics card.
    Well worth the money.

    OR if you want to stay in the AGP relm try and buy another replacement motherboard. When mine blew out I ran all over the place and online tryng to get a replacement one and was forced into the PCI express route.
     
  4. jolt8me

    jolt8me Your the devil

    188
    0
    May 9, 2004
    Michigan


    I was thinking about that but the case I have is a dell and you cant fit another motherboard into it.
     
  5. jolt8me

    jolt8me Your the devil

    188
    0
    May 9, 2004
    Michigan
  6. NetNinja

    NetNinja Always Faithful

    967
    0
    Oct 23, 2001
    HotLanta, GA
    Indygunfreak's suggestion was a good one.

    Everyone has thier preferences.

    I am not a fan of ATI cards, to each his own.

    This one will suit you well.
    Not to expensive and 256MB of ram.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814150107

    If you need to replace the case you should be able to move everything from that restricted Dell case into a new one without any problems.

    I absolutely love this case! I have one and as your computer needs grow (pcie) you can slide in newer components.

    The cooling in this case is very nice, comes with nice fans. Great for people who run dual graphics cards or overclock thier CPU's.

    In fact I will replace an older case with this lighter one.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119142
     
  7. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

    25,790
    1,052
    Jan 26, 2001
    Indiana
    Agreed, I hate ATI... Probably because its freakin ridiculous to get working w/ Linux, because they never bothered me much w/ Windows.

    I'd go with any of the Nvidia cards in this thread.

    IGF
     
  8. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

    25,790
    1,052
    Jan 26, 2001
    Indiana
    Doesn't Dell us some kind of funky, proprietary power supply also? I seem to remember reading this.

    I'd rebuild the PC completely. Keep what you believe you can use on the new PC(Probably DVD drive, and maybe Hard drive) and build from there.

    IGF
     
  9. theleafybug

    theleafybug

    332
    0
    Jul 17, 2008
    CA
    Don't try to completely rebuild a Dell... It really isn't worth it.
    If you aren't thinking about all the upgrades, the 512 version of that card is probably good.
    If you are thinking about getting a new mobo/cpu/ram/video card/psu... that's a new computer. Getting a decent mobo with PCI-e and a new cpu and ram is probably going to cost you a couple hundred bucks. If you are seriously thinking about spending this much, buy a new computer.
    Nowadays off-the-shelf computers are getting cheap. And many of them come with a PCI-e slot. Grab yourself a new computer - you may be able to find one that comes with a decent video card too for a good price.

    IF you are buying a new video card for a PCI-e slot, I recommend nVidia. There's nothing wrong with ATI, they're good cards. nVidia is just way easier to upgrade (same software works with all the cards).



    Also, get the card from a local retailer when it is on sale and MAKE SURE YOU BUY BFG! BFG cards come with a lifetime warranty. Sooo... if you ever want to upgrade again in the future, just take the card back to the store and exchange it for the upgraded card.
     
  10. Orkinman

    Orkinman

    212
    0
    Jan 10, 2008
    Northern VA
    Just an FYI. Make sure your motherboard can handle an 8X AGP card. I screwed this one up myself and wound up eating the cost of a card. Unless it's a recent AGP board or a PCI Express board it's a real puzzle to find out what you can support.

    I tried to put an 8X card on a board that was 2x to 4x and even though the card should have been able to slow down and limit itself to 4x it just didn't boot. There are voltage differences that can make this happen.

    I'm with whoever said it's time for a new computer.
     
  11. jolt8me

    jolt8me Your the devil

    188
    0
    May 9, 2004
    Michigan
    Thanks for the heads up on this issue. I started reading about it and seems that most video cards problems with sticking an 8x into a 4x or lower agp slot is voltage irregularities. I am trying to figure out how many volts goes to the agp slot on my motherboard but its not as easy to figure out as you would think.

    would this be it?
    AGP bus protocols
    4x/2x modes at 1.5 V
     
  12. g29andy

    g29andy CLM

    2,695
    58
    Jan 28, 2001
    I have a Dimension 8300, 3ghz P4, 3GB RAM. Running a GeForce 7600GS 256MB card, does pretty good.