close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Welcome to Glock Talk

Why should YOU join our Glock forum?

  • Converse with other Glock Enthusiasts
  • Learn about the latest hunting products
  • Becoming a member is FREE and EASY

If you consider yourself a beginner or an avid shooter, the Glock Talk community is your place to discuss self defense, concealed carry, reloading, target shooting, and all things Glock.

what steel does gssf use for glock the plates?

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by Dragoon189, Nov 9, 2012.

  1. Dragoon189

    Dragoon189

    280
    0
    Feb 10, 2012
    I plan to set up some simple round steel targets for practice with my 34. Does the gssf use A36 steel or ar500? I hope to keep the costs low for more money that will go to ammo but don't want to waste it on crap steel or going overboard on the plates.
     
  2. gearjammer921

    gearjammer921

    42
    0
    Oct 23, 2011
    georgia
    i just bought a plate rack that has ar500 on it and it has over 3000 rounds on it so far and it does not have a mark on it that stuff holds up well
     


  3. yobohadi

    yobohadi Peon Trainee

    247
    1
    Oct 25, 2009
    Southwest Idaho
    I built my plate rack using ar500 steel, but with pistol calibers you could get away with Mild steel, I have a couple spinners I welded together using 3/8" mild plate and they have held up great against years of stopping my 44 mag bullets.
     
  4. ede

    ede Bama's Friend

    8,228
    63
    Jun 25, 2004
    Texas
    See below.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2012
  5. Comrade Bork

    Comrade Bork

    2,526
    353
    May 1, 2001
    Georgia
    I asked Scott the same question once.

    He said the guy who makes GSSFs Plate racks, Dan Meadows, does not even tell them what steel he uses.

    He said that Dan said, if the steel is not ductile enough to bend, it just cracks. That is why after some use, GSSF plates "cup" backwards. They everntually bend so much they pop their welds. They can usually be rewelded once. When they pop the second time, they are so deformed they cannot be rewelded again and it is time to scrap them.

    Scott said that when it is time to scrap a GSSF plate, he has Dan weld a piece of square tubing to the back, through which can pass a piece of 1/2" rebar. He then hangs it downrange and uses it for a rifle target.

    I have seen and shot these, at the now defunct Pensacola match. On Saturday after the match, they would put them out and bang away at them with rifles until sundown shut the range down.

    We are talkiing about a keyhole shape here, the 8" diameter round plate, and the 3"x3" square tab to which the hinge can no longer be welded.

    The pounding of all the pistol bullets surface-hardens the surface so much, that hitting it with a .223, .308, or .30-06 ball just takes the paint off; it does not crater.

    Although, hitting it on the square tab, which during use on the plate rack does not get hit, does crater. That is enough to prove that this is not rifle rated steel.

    Hitting the edge of the plate will also take a chunk out of it as the energy of the hit is more concentrated on a small area.

    But who cares?

    It is still scrap.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2012
  6. glock_collector

    glock_collector

    851
    0
    Dec 23, 2011
    Ar 400 or 500 welds just fine with the mig process, Whadda ya think 7018 is?? Any S6 hardwire is the same as your stick series, the only diff is the way its applied and the use of a shielding gas instead of the flux coating on the rod. Alot of the wire I run in my company is of the 70 series, very common. I fab and install targets and indoor shooting traps, private and federal facilities. Reverse polarity is useful on ar due to the spotty magnetism, 308 ss rods properties are not the best for any of the high magneese steels, you will get very fine cracks that will weaken the welds.
     
  7. ede

    ede Bama's Friend

    8,228
    63
    Jun 25, 2004
    Texas
    I stand corrected, I thought 7018 was a stick process not mig. I can see you know way more about this than I do and will defer to your greater knowledge. I'll delete my post so no one goes away from here misinformed.

    http://www.cliftonsteel.com/tensalloy-blue-ar500.html

    http://www.steelife.com/AR 500.htm

    For comparison A106 B comes in at 1.06 Mn, higher than one mills AR500 and lower than anothers. A106 is about as weldable a matal as you'll find.

    Not being an ASTM material leaves the door wide open for the mills when they make it. I calculated the CE and depending on whos chemistry I used got .52 to .63 so what's that tell you about ease of welding?

    http://www.leonghuat.com/articles/elements.htm
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2012
  8. mike g35

    mike g35

    2,240
    0
    Jun 23, 2011
    Charleston W.V.
    I have some 8 inch knockovers from Quality Targets, they're not AR500. I have a 8 inch Colt Speed Plate auto popper and a 1/2 scale IPSC target from MGM targets that ARE made from AR500. The plates work just fine. They've been shot quite a bit and only show a few small dents. AR500 isn't necessary IMO unless you're shooting steel with a rifle.


    Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire
     
  9. njl

    njl

    7,800
    670
    Sep 28, 2000
    :noitacoL
    Thickness of the plates may also be critical. I bought some knock down plates cheap on ebay. Seller claimed they were AR400 1/4". 9mm 124gr FMJ at 1070fps made small dents in them. Maybe they aren't really AR400. I have no way of knowing. Maybe 1/4" is just too thin. I suspect they're fine for .22lr...but not great for larger stuff.

    Have any of you tried to simulate a plate rack with a setup of 6 of these and 6 shepherd's hooks?

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/8-In-Round-...353?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3ccb2bb669
     
  10. Comrade Bork

    Comrade Bork

    2,526
    353
    May 1, 2001
    Georgia
    I learned that style of shooting as a just-out-of-college-&-relatively-penniless bowling pin shooter back in the early 1980's

    At the time, Bowling Pins were all the rage, and I lived in snow country.

    Picking empty brass out of the snow got old fast.

    So, I picked up an original Colt .22 conversion kit for my then-1911.

    I'd set up one 8' 2x4 between two sawhorses, the regulation 25 feet out.

    The gun club I shot at always had a bunch of empty trashed 12 gauge hulls in the trash barrels on the trap range.

    I would grab a bunch of those, and set 5 of them on the 2x4. Back off, load the .22/1911 with the 8 rounds a then-1911 would hold, set the timer to "delay", and bang away.

    If Icould hit 3 out of 5 in 7 or 8 seconds, that was pretty darn good.

    Then, when I would go to an actual pin match, using actual pins, with my now-.45 equipped 1911, it was "how could you possibly miss?" Those pins looked like I was shooting Saturn V missiles after getting used to picking off those 12 gauge hulls

    :supergrin:
     
  11. GUNS N' HOGS

    GUNS N' HOGS

    101
    0
    Jul 28, 2012
    SE Kentucky
  12. njl

    njl

    7,800
    670
    Sep 28, 2000
    :noitacoL
    Where'd you get them, and for how much?
     
  13. mike g35

    mike g35

    2,240
    0
    Jun 23, 2011
    Charleston W.V.
    You can get similar steel plates (knockovers) from quality targets. They're about $80 for 6 8 inch plates. That's about the best deal I've found.


    Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire
     
  14. njl

    njl

    7,800
    670
    Sep 28, 2000
    :noitacoL
    After having used a set of knockovers, I'd really rather switch to some kind of hanging solution. Having to walk downrange to reset is bad enough without also having to dig them out of the dirt berm.