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War on drugs. Question.

Discussion in 'Civil Liberties Issues' started by frank4570, Dec 4, 2011.

  1. M&P Shooter

    M&P Shooter Metal Member

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    The war on criminals doesn't work so well either but you must always continue to fight. To say we should end the war on drugs is like saying we just lay down and give up.
     
  2. Lethaltxn

    Lethaltxn

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    You must be one of those heartless right wingers! :rofl::tongueout:
     

  3. M&P Shooter

    M&P Shooter Metal Member

    10,639
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    Jul 19, 2009
    Phila, PA
  4. Lampshade

    Lampshade

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    It shouldn't be a war in the first place.

    See your signature... the little part about people being "free?"
     
  5. clancy

    clancy

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    When the "War on Drugs" started in the 60's I do not think it was intended to becoem the oppressive, Constitution shredding assualt on the citizens of the US it is now. I have a friend who did 2 years in prison under the Rockefeller Law's in the 70's, all because he had 2 joints. Another friend cashed his Christmas Club check a couple years ago, got stopped for speeding on the way to the mall and had his $2500 confiscated by the police. In the town I once lived in a kid was growing about a half dozen pot plants. His parents home was seized by the police and auctioned off. One old guy cashed in a CD and took the money to a local car dealership to pay cash for a new car. The cops were called and they took his money too. According to the local newspaper, it cost him almost $5000 in lawyer fees to get his $30,000 back.

    There is a whole industry that has developed over drug testing. Even the local fast food places and supermarkets are now testing applicants. Our local police departments have become in far too many instances militarized and unapproachable. At least half of the population of our prisons are there for non-violent drug crimes, and violent felons are being given early release to make room for more.

    To me, the was on drugs has become a war on the American people and the US Constitution.
     
  6. Danny Reid

    Danny Reid

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    Essentially, you can substitute drugs with any other enterprise people want to legalize. The underground element will still always exist.
     
  7. frank4570

    frank4570

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    So you think we should just continue on the same path? Or should we do something different, still maintaining the war on drugs? What do you think we should do?
     
  8. McJohnny

    McJohnny The dude abides

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    The Great White North
    Quoted for truth.
     
  9. certifiedfunds

    certifiedfunds Tewwowist

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    Much fail here.

    Only the government can create a black market.
     
  10. certifiedfunds

    certifiedfunds Tewwowist

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    If you fabricate a cause with sufficient nobility or fear the American people will tolerate anything.
     
  11. Danny Reid

    Danny Reid

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    No fail at all. Legalize em and see what happens.
     
  12. GAFinch

    GAFinch

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    70% of prisoners test positive for once a week or greater drug use when they first go in.
     
  13. certifiedfunds

    certifiedfunds Tewwowist

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    Cool. Back it up. How does a black market "underground" develop absent government intervention?
     
  14. NMG26

    NMG26

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    +1

    Pie in the sky?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrHUD2XmLN4







    :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  15. GAFinch

    GAFinch

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    The war on drugs was winning, which is why drugs, including pot and meth, moved down to Mexico. It's the lax immigration enforcement that allowed the Mexican cartels to gradually gain size and power. Of course, that's the real reason many people don't want illegal immigration made illegal again.
     
  16. Vanilla-gorilla

    Vanilla-gorilla Registered Noob

    Ha. Yep thats how they do it.
     
  17. Danny Reid

    Danny Reid

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    Easy. Say we legalize it all tomorrow. In the libertarian world, that would be the end of it. That isn't reality, though. Hand in hand with legalization would come regulation. Color me dubious, but when I think of addicts the thought that they are the sort to operate within specific constraints seems a bit goofy.

    Who knows? Maybe some crackheads and Meth users may be willing to go through proper channels in order to get their fix once it's legalized, but I kinda doubt it.
     
  18. mike1956

    mike1956

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    The medical industry has a vested interest in keeping marijuana illegal.
     
  19. I just don't know...

    Consider this: A light plane with an unknown cargo leaves Cuba and heads toward the US. Do you think it'll make it to shore? A similar plane takes off from Mexico or Colombia. Somehow, it lands in Florida or Texas or Arizona and unloads its cargo to waiting accomplices. What's the difference? They're both invading. They're both, by law, a threat. But one has great propaganda value in its interdiction, and the other brings lots of money to all of the participants... the hunters and the hunted, both.

    The war on drugs, like government subsidies to oil companies or factory farms is a redistribution of wealth from you and I to wealthy folks. It's theft. And I contend that the war on drugs is tearing this country apart. No other country in the world... not Red China, not Iran, not Myanmar... has as high a percentage of its own citizens in prison as the USA. And it's that silly war on drugs that's to blame. Time to end that war.

    As an aside, I'm pleasantly surprised at the quality of thought and the tone of discourse in this thread. Once in a while, I get very tired of the unthinking and poorly expressed comments of some GTers. It makes me sad for the future of our country, if ignorance and bigotry are accepted as normal. But then I read through a thread like this, or one of the technical threads, and my faith is restored. Thanks, ya'll.
     
  20. mike1956

    mike1956

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    Fighting an unwinnable war against the behaviors of a significant portion of a nation's own citizens is foolish. People are going to do what they do whether you give up, or not.