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War on drugs. Question.

Discussion in 'Civil Liberties Issues' started by frank4570, Dec 4, 2011.

  1. frank4570

    frank4570

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    I am personally of the opinion that we need a drastically different approach to dealing with drugs. So that is my view.

    My question is for the people who are in favor of continuing the war on drugs.
    Bear with me for a second. I think the war on drugs is only having a very small effect toward the goal of preventing americans from getting drugs. I would guess for every $1 worth of drugs we prevent, $100 gets through. And it costs us $100 in resources to keep out that $1.
    That is a terrible return on our money. And it looks to me like we are losing ground. We are not winning.

    So if you support the war on drugs, how do you see this going? Are you comfortable with continuing down the same path and just hoping for the best?
     
  2. INJoker

    INJoker Simply Charming

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    I've never done any "hard" drugs and I have a white-collar job. I don't hang out with drug-users or hard-partiers or scheisters of any kind.

    That said, by my own estimate, I could have anything I wanted of good quality delivered to my house by noon in under 3 phone calls for a competitive price.

    Again, I do not use drugs, but I fully support legalizing marijuana.

    For destructive drugs like meth, however, I think we should take the Singapore approach to dealing with dealers/traffickers.
     

  3. I think the war on drugs has been as successful as prohibition was.

    At least it's made the criminal gangs very successful.

    I think if we took all the money spent in the war on drugs and incarcerating drug dealers and spent it on treatment programs instead we would be better off.
     
  4. The thing I've never figured out is a country like Holland - no "War on Drugs" (to say the least) over there but the Dutch don't seem to be falling apart. Heck, seems they have their country more together than Italy or Greece and I haven't heard of them needing a bailout.

    Or maybe its just all the tourists that go there for drug holidays??
     
  5. mike1956

    mike1956

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    For those who wage it, and those who prosper from it, the war on drugs is very successful.
    For the rest of us, it is a war on self: divisive; unwinnable; unsustainable and destructive. The jails are full and the treasuries are overburdened, with no end, or even an objective in sight.
     
  6. Steel Head

    Steel Head Tactical Cat

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    To me the war on drugs is a sham-look like your doing something and spend a whole lot of money doing nothing.
    A mix of treatment,education and much more effective penalties could help.
     
  7. Lethaltxn

    Lethaltxn

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    It makes people feel good. And isn't that worth an amount of money?
    /sarcasm
     
  8. Bruce M

    Bruce M

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    Out of curiousity what drastically different approach do you suggest?
     
  9. I always get a good laugh when I read the local paper's story of a marijuana eradication operation.

    99% of the time, it's a group of 10-12 overweight cops, all dressed in tactical gear with ATV's and a helicopter, posing with a small growing operation.

    I would guess they spend thousands of dollars to wipe out a few plants.

    This is a great example of waste.
     
  10. mike1956

    mike1956

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    It doesn't make me feel good, and I'm a people.
     
  11. K.Kiser

    K.Kiser

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    I don't belive in treatment at all, to me that makes it look like a drug addict has a illness which they do not... A drug addict has a deficit of responsibility, accountability, concern toward others, healthy concern for themselves, and just all-around complete lack of judgement and a surplus of selfishness...

    I like the appraoch my Dad has always mentioned... When drugs are confiscated, just poison the crap and put it back out on the streets... It will only kill who it needs to, and drugs will quickly start to carry a pretty lethal reputation and maybe it'll act as a deterrent... If it's not a deterrent, who gives a $h** cause it will just kill the ones that can't head a warning...

    There comes a point with a serious problems that ya got to lose compassion, and just fix the ********** problem... I say F'em -- killem all...
    It's time responsible and contributing citizens get all that they deserve from the society in which we've conributed to...

    BTW - I've never smoked a joint in my life, but I don't think weed is a real big deal that needs to soak up much of our tax $$...
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  12. frank4570

    frank4570

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    Probably something along the lines of legalizing pot and increasing money on treatment programs.
    Honestly, my approach would simply be to do some research and find out what actually works and move in that direction, screw what people "think" should work. What we are doing doesn't work, but we keep doing it.

    When I was in spain kids a lot younger than adults drank alcohol. None of the locals thought it was a big deal. And they were never drunk like the americans were. Maybe there is a lesson in there.
     
  13. frank4570

    frank4570

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    I don't care how it looks. I care what works.
    It seems to me that being concerned about how things look, instead of how things are, is emotional instead of logical.
     
  14. mike1956

    mike1956

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    De-criminalize drug use across the board and stop making total abstinence a condition for employment, health care, and social services in the form of mandatory drug testing, for starters. Recognize the difference between the recreational pot smoker and the daily heroin addict. Stop treating a voluntary behavior as both a lifelong disease and a criminal activity. Stop lying to children in an attempt to scare them into adopting a totally-abstinent lifestyle. Recognize, at a federal level, the genuine medicinal applications of marijuana. Admit and accept as a society that a small percentage of that society is going to act irresponsibly in their consumption of mind-altering substances, while the overwhelming majority of those who do so, do so moderately.
     
  15. Bruce M

    Bruce M

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    I would consider decriminalization but as far as employment goes I think that should be left up to employers. Unless someone can show that the F16 driver does as well after testing positive. As far as medical use of marijuana if the guys at Brigham and Womens, Cleveland Clinic, Reagan, Bethesda, MGH etc. decide it has benefit, I agree.
     
  16. frank4570

    frank4570

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    I think that's pretty much it right there. We already have years and years of experience/evidence when looking at the drug alcohol.
     
  17. Bruce M

    Bruce M

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    Also I'm gonna go way way out on a limb and suggest this thread will have the same fate as others of the same topic.
     
  18. frank4570

    frank4570

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    I have 3 bad discs and nerve damage in both my ankles, chronic pain. You'd be surprised how many people have told me that a small amount of THC would stomp out the pain and leave me perfectly functional. Not really an option for me though. I'm not into doing illegal stuff.
     
  19. Flying-Dutchman

    Flying-Dutchman

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    .....
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  20. frank4570

    frank4570

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    Good point. I'm going to see if I can steer it toward my original question.