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US History Without Mention of Freemasonry?

Discussion in 'Political Issues' started by Silas.soule, Jun 14, 2013.

  1. Silas.soule

    Silas.soule

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    Too bad they don't teach about freemasonry in more American history classes. Once upon a time, one President after another was a Freemason, and many if not most of the founders were. Mason Ben Franklin went to France and helped initiate Voltaire into a lodge. He also used the Masonic network to recruit 2 Masons with military experience: France's Lafayette and a guy named Von Steuben who was from what would later become Germany. Masonry was a big part of overthrowing the established order in Europe. The established order equaled royalty and state religion.

    I think there is a reason Freemasonry is omitted from classes:

    It's a touchy topic! At the time of the nation's founding, few saw any conflict between Christianity and Freemasonry. The immigration of millions of Catholics changed that. Also, conservatism itself changed.

    Some say the USA is a Masonic project.

    1) The first thing in the charter of freemasonry is a call for religious tolerance.
    2) This, plus the desire to not repeat the problems Europe encountered when government and religion were mixed led the founders to separate church and state. This doesn't mean they were anti-Christian, just that they felt it GOOD for both religion and government to be separate.
    3) At least one Pope decreed that any Catholic becoming a Mason was excommunicated. At the time, Catholicism was accustomed to being the state religion in large swaths of Europe, and did not like the new experiment overseas. The only part of the American revolution never tried anywhere before was separation of government from religion.
    4) Masons helped fuel the French revolution, and who opposed that revolution? Royalty and the church.

    There you have it, in my opinion. The animosity between Freemasonry and Roman Catholicism makes the topic of Freemasonry's role in the founding a touchy topic, and Protestants who dislike secular government do not value what Freemasons created. Anyone have other theories?

    What is to become of a nation that doesn't learn a part of its history? What is to become of a nation in which many people consider a group that was essential to the founding of the republic a bad thing?

    http://www.examiner.com/article/the-intersection-of-free-masonry-humanism-and-secularism-part-i
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2013
  2. countrygun

    countrygun

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    Being an historian, but not a Mason, or a Christian, I think my opinion is balanced from an historical perspective and I agree with you.
     


  3. Silas.soule

    Silas.soule

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    Thanks. I'm a former Christian, and son of a Mason. With a BA in history.
     
  4. countrygun

    countrygun

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    Well if you want to carry the masonic history a couple of steps further you should examine the effects of the Freemasons on the cities and a politics of the western cities and communities.
     
  5. Silas.soule

    Silas.soule

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    You mean good, bad, or both? I'm open minded, so I'll check out anything.

    Say, I just found this from The Holocaust Museum, about Nazi persecution of Masons. Seems Adolph & Crew thought Masons were in with the Jews.

    Well, considering both favored Democracy and free trade, and were international in nature, this isn't surprising.

    You know, I've heard 2 Americans talk as if Masonry was awful. One was a former prosecutor who told me he'd look for Masonic rings on the hands of prospective jurors, figuring they'd be anti-Catholic. Another was a professor at a public university who just said to me, "Masons. Bad. Bad." That's all pretty sad, considering we'd never have become a nation without 'em. Heck, without the secular USA, the Nazis would have de-Judified The Vatican, turning Catholicism into something else altogether, the way China's government appoints the bishops to the Chinese Catholic church. Afterall, Jesus was one of them.

    http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007187
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2013
  6. Snowman92D

    Snowman92D

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    I'm in the Scottish Rite. The Masonic influence was a positive thing in the development of our nation. Thanks for posting your comments and observations.
     
  7. countrygun

    countrygun

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    Many of the communities in the west, particularly along the coast were founded or helped along by the commonality of the masonic experience and the bond between members. Too many people like to color that as "evil" but that comes from a fringe "conspiracy theory" attitude IMO. A common bond was necessary for growth and development especially "on a frontier". Folks tend to forget that the first "pilgrims" had a strong commonality.

    I compiled biographies of many of our early founders in this region and, in going through their writings, it was quite common to find them establishing business connections across the region and casually mentioning in their writings that the other person was a Mason. The "Carpenters" (which in the day were also the architects and designers) were strongly Masonic. It still had some "trade guild" aspects. NOT a "union" but a guild of tradesmen with and educational apprenticeship quality.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2013
  8. jtull7

    jtull7 Pistolero CLM

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    Would you have schools teach about the Jaycees? Rotary? The American Legion? How about the Moose Lodge? Fraternal Order of Eagles?
     
  9. countrygun

    countrygun

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    If the Founders had been members in such a percentage as they were Masons I think it would be a part of history that should get a mention. Having belonged to two of those myself I can say that their mention of "faith" and a "creator" is strangely similar to the non-denominational view of the Masons that pre-date them by centuries.
     
  10. Batesmotel

    Batesmotel

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    I was a history teacher. I am a Mason and a Christian. I think you are right on. I think Masonic teaching have had a very positive influence on governments all over the world. The Philippine revolt against the Spanish was lead by Masons and there is much Masonic symbolism in their flag. Many free nations have Masonic principles in their constitutions because of founding leaders who were Masons.

    Masonry teaches toleration and the brotherhood of all men under the all seeing eye of a divine creator. Regardless of who, what or how a man worships. Advancement in the arts and sciences to beautify the world and improve mans estate on earth. Honest dealings with all men under a framework of law. And charity to those unable to care for themselves.

    Nor bad ideas for a government to follow.
     
  11. TheRogue

    TheRogue

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    This documentary presents Masonic history in the U.S.
    [ame]http://youtu.be/MG1x6Q9udzs[/ame]
     
  12. countrygun

    countrygun

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    I may not have gotten to the correct video. I was confronted with a series of "Inside the Masonic conspiracy" type videos.

    The whole series ties them very clearly to the illuminati, the Bildebergs, The grassy knoll, Chemtrails and 9/11, why it's clearly irrefutable :rofl:

    :upeyes:
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2013
  13. TheRogue

    TheRogue

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    Did "we" watch the same documentary? :dunno:
     
  14. countrygun

    countrygun

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    I had to click on the header to get it to pop up on my browser and got taken to a bunch of Masonic conspiracy videos. It may be my fault for using a browser program from "Bubba's Burger and Browser Barn" .

    I'll edit my post to reflect that.
     
  15. JohnH

    JohnH Millennium Member

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    Well, that explains a lot!:whistling:
     
  16. Snowman92D

    Snowman92D

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    Now...don't be mean. You'll be working for us soon. :bluesbrothers:
     
  17. JohnH

    JohnH Millennium Member

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    I bet you typed that with your fez on.:supergrin:
     
  18. rgregoryb

    rgregoryb Sapere aude

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    I'm Scots , and I've never had a mason work for free.
     
  19. Snowman92D

    Snowman92D

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    The Shriners wear the fez hats.

    You have to be either York Rite or Scottish Rite to be one, but I never could warm up to their program, or afford their dues.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2013
  20. Snowman92D

    Snowman92D

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    Well....you of all people would know the Scots have some pretty strange rites. :supergrin: