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Unburnt powder, mag prime?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by utfelon, Aug 16, 2011.


  1. utfelon

    utfelon
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    I worked up a load for my pistol. It shoots really well but doesn't burn all the powder. Would a mag primer help? I don't know anything about mag prime. Does it burn hotter or what! Please enlighten me.



    Thanx
     

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  2. TacDad

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    You should stay away from magnum primers unless you are shooting a magnum round out of a gun that can handle it ..... i.e. N-frame revolver or Desert Eagle ...... Unless you can find a reloading book that says you should than I would steer clear ....
     

  3. utfelon

    utfelon
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    Thats what CCI web site says but why? does it create more pressure or a big spike?
     
  4. Zombie Steve

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    Please give us the details of the load (cartridge, powder / weight, bullet / weight). It's likely you're underloading a powder that is slow for the application.
     
  5. Zombie Steve

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    ...and magnum primers aren't going to set the world on fire. Sure, if you're close to max, it might push you over switching components, but when you change components you should be backing off and working back up slowly anyway.
     
  6. dbarry

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    Back when primers were hard to find, I used max primers in everything. Just back things down a little as ZS said above. Some powders I've found are hard to get complete burn in. Some wont burn completely regardless of bullet, crimp, primer... Some you just need a longer barrel to burn it all. (in my personal experience, 2400, 300-MP, 4756 fall into this category)
     
  7. fredj338

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    Exaclty, w/o add'l info, it's hard to give a good answer. A mag rpimer may or may not help, it depends. If you are using the wrong powder for low vel loads, it won't help. All pistol powders have a sweet spot where the completely combust in a 3-4" bbl, upto maybe HS6 is burn rate. Beyond that, slower powders always leave some unburnt powder behind & need longer bbls. The powders you listed all need a 5"+ bbl & near max loads to give compelte combustion. FWIW, I do not use a mag primer w/ 2400.
     
    #7 fredj338, Aug 16, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2011
  8. Zombie Steve

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    I've followed the Lyman 49 data with 2400 and a mag spp with great results using a 158 XTP in .357 mag. I'm not at their max load, but close...

    Just depends, I suppose.
     
  9. cole

    cole
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    I run standard and mag primers interchangeably in 9mm. Basically, whatever I get cheap. Has never mattered. For a mag caliber use a mag primer and the really slow powders favor mag primers. Otherwise, your load issue may be due to something else. Upping the charge and/or decreasing OAL can help the burn. Or change powders. Again, depends on what your load specs are.
     
  10. utfelon

    utfelon
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    Its for a .40 I'm loading Montana gold 180 Jhp, 7.3 gr of Blue dot at about 950 FPS.
    C.O.L. 1.120. I bumped it up to 7.8 gr and 1.130 C.O.L.
     
  11. Zombie Steve

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    I think we found the culprit. :cool:

    Burns pretty darn slow for a service cartridge like the .40 S&W.
     
  12. G19ftw

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    I've always had a problem with Blue Dot leaving a little in the barrel, regardless of the caliber, bullet and load. Not too big of a deal to me.
     
  13. fredj338

    fredj338
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    In most manuals, you are below starting data. Starting data with any powdr but uberfasts will leave unburnt powder. Something like BD burns best near the top end, so not a good choice for plinkers or gamer loads. You'll want to drop to a medium burner like WSF or Unique, just about right for most vel levels, even full power loads.
     
  14. utfelon

    utfelon
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    The question is not my load. The question is would a mag prime help in likewise situations, and what do Mag primers do? It doesn't take a Dr. before someones name to figure out that blue dot is slow burning.
     
    #14 utfelon, Aug 17, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2011
  15. Zombie Steve

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    It doesn't take a genius to figure out what magnum primers do either. Folks were just trying to help.

    Have fun.
     
  16. El_Ron1

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    AAAAAAAAGHHH!!!

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    Is anybody gonna ask where all that WTF is layin'?
     
  17. n2extrm

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    I see you are new here, welcome to the forum. Fred is extremely experienced in reloading. He is really a wealth of information. He has played with many combination and done alot of testing. What he is telling you is the problem is not your primer. Magnum primers tend to burn hotter. This won't solve your problem. The problem is you have a slow powder, which I am guessing you know by the above response. The powder has not completes its burn before the projectile leaves the barrel. Therefore the unburnt powder. If you can reach the sweet spot that the powder burns in you can eliminate most if not all of the unburnt powder, however this may not be possible to achieve in the caliber in question given the burn rate of the powder chosen, while remaining inside of a safe pressure range. It's like trying to drive a screw with a hammer, you can make it work but it's not the best choice. Using a bigger hammer isn't going to make it better, even if it gets it done with less swings.

    One last thought if advice and knowledge is what you seek, offending people with insulting comments isn't the way to go. You could learn alot from the folks here, first being polite.
     
  18. vikingsoftpaw

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    Please provide more background info, such as the caliber, power, projectile and primer.

    Some powders are known for being 'dirty' and leaving residue, like Bullseye.

    Perhaps the powder is a little too slow for your barrel length.

    I had issues firing loads developed for my S&W 586 6" Barrel in my 3" S&W 65. With a slower pistol powder like AA7, I was spraying unburned powder grains in the Mod 65, producing a sparkler effect.

    Generally speaking Mag primers are only used on larger, hard to ignite powder charges. Think Magnum Cartridges like .44 Mag and some .357 loads.

    Your reloading manual will list if they are specifically called for.
     
  19. freakshow10mm

    freakshow10mm
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    The question is not your load. The answer is to change to a faster powder. Blue Dot does not belong in the .40 S&W cartridge for any reason under any circumstances. It doesn't take a Dr. before someone's name to figure out that Blue Dot is the wrong powder to use for the .40 S&W. Just because there is data for it, doesn't mean it's a good idea.

    You are looking at the wrong culprit. The issue isn't your primer, it's your powder.
     
  20. cole

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    Your issue is using BD and a mag primer will not help. Do an internet search for "Blue Dot .40sw unburnt" or variations there of. BD, IMO, is a poor choice for .40sw, and the shorter the barrel and weaker the load the worse it will be. I think of very slow powders like BD as "magnum" powders and I would not push my luck with the .40sw. Change powders or accept unburnt powder.

    I think forum decorum has been covered well enough already and I hope you paid attention.
     
    #20 cole, Aug 18, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2011