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Trouble with 1187

Discussion in 'Tactical Shotguns' started by ZRiz19C, Jun 16, 2010.

  1. ZRiz19C

    ZRiz19C In The Woods

    225
    0
    Dec 31, 2008
    Ohio/Kentucky
    I was shooting my 20ga 1187 this past weekend and experienced a problem after around 20 Remington field loads. The gun has around 500 shells through it in total.

    The action/bolt carrier was not locking back into the back of the receiver. After I removed the barrel from the gun I was unable to reassemble the shotgun w/ the barrel.

    [​IMG]

    The two circled areas connect to work the action of the gun. The RED circled area has two inwards edges that attach into the BLUE circled notches. One of these edges was completely out of the notch creating a blockage for reinstalling the barrel aswell as working the action on the gun. I used a rubber mallet to pound the pieces back together and the gun seems to function as normal now.

    What I am wondering is if any other 1187 owners have experienced this? And also should I be concerned and/or call Remington before using the shotgun again?
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2010
  2. aippi

    aippi

    1,726
    17
    Jun 12, 2009
    the action bar sleeve and action bar assembly are two pieces and are easy to disassemble and re-assemble. You simply insert a screwdriver behind the action bar in the slot on the side of the sleeve and pry the bar from the slot. To put it back you insert one side of the action bar into the sleeve and tap the other side downward until the action bar slide into the groove. Being very careful not to bend or twist the action action bars. At no time should it take any kind of mallet as these come apart easy and go back together very easy.

    It should not have come loose but could have if not installed correctly. I can not tell you if there is any damage as I can't see them, however you state the weapon seems to be working fine so they may be fine. If want 100% assurance the issue will not occur again then the two parts are Action bar Assembly part #RF33930 retail $69 and the action bar sleeve part #F200369 retail $27. For sure, if this occurs again, replace them.
     


  3. ZRiz19C

    ZRiz19C In The Woods

    225
    0
    Dec 31, 2008
    Ohio/Kentucky
    Thank you for the information. The mallet didn't seem to have any negative effects on the parts. Since the action bar sleeve has such a tight fit with the barrel I can't understand how it could seperate during shooting. I am not sure what to do to prevent the same thing from happening again.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2010
  4. aippi

    aippi

    1,726
    17
    Jun 12, 2009
    You may want to check the ends of the action bars where they snap into the action sleeve. If one of them is bent outwards this could have caused it to come out during stress. If this is the case. Disassemble as I described in my post and see if you can bend it back in place. It is a 90 degree angle so if it is not, then it is bent. Sure beast $100 plus after shipping for new parts.

    If you are the original owner and never had this apart then it is deffinately strange. If weapon came from somone else, you don't know what they may have done to it and they could have bent it trying to take it apart.

    If the ends of the action bars are a 90 degree angle and snap in place, I don't think the issue will repeat. If it does, look at the sleeve and if it is not damaged where the action bars snap into the slot, you may get away with just the new action bar assembly.

    I have to add that if you are not comfortable checking these parts or replacing them. Then by all means take it to a gun smith to be check or repaired.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2010