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Trigger Pull, How Light Is Too Light?

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by phi1281, Mar 13, 2012.

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  1. phi1281

    phi1281

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    Removed
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 13, 2012
  2. tenifer17

    tenifer17

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    I carry a G34 with a 3.5lb trigger . I say that as long as you keep your finger out of the trigger guard until ready to fire then you could go as light as you want , even for a carry gun. I love my G34 as a carry gun. It is the same length as a 1911 , carries twice as much ammo and it really accurate.
    The key thing , as with all guns , is to keep your finger out of the trigger guard until ready to fire. Then you can run as light as you want .
     

  3. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    Ideal trigger depends on purpose of the gun, doesn't it?

    I've got a Savage 10FP .308 with the factory adjustable light target trigger. I don't know the weight ranges but it is low. I sit at a bench trying to make small groups. But I also have a Savage 110 .30-06 with their factory standard hunting trigger. I hump that gun up and down hills, after deer.

    When I'm hunting and picking up an animal in my sights, my finger is on the trigger. Waiting for that signal from my brain to fire. In that situation, I personally want a wall for my finger to feel in taking up trigger creep. For a moment I'm waiting at that position, and then when I decide, BANG.

    Too light a trigger, and I won't have that same comforting feeling on my finger tip at the ready position with the animal in my sights. Don't want my finger off the trigger and don't want the gun to fire before I consciously make the decision.

    To clarify, when not in a firing position, my finger is off the trigger. I'm just talking about the moment the animal is in the sights, an animal I've already decided to shoot. There are times I will bring a gun up and not yet have decided if this is an animal I'm going to shoot, and my finger is not on the trigger.

    This is all similar to how I think about handguns.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2012
  4. TMNKWD

    TMNKWD

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    I installed a "-" connector in my G3 17 after doing a detail trigger job. It was very smooth and light. Too light in fact. After thousands of rounds through it in stock set-up I did not like it.

    My opinion is that it doesn't matter if it's for CCW. If you pull your weapon to shoot the bad guy, who cares what the trigger pull is. If you miss and hit the guy pumping gas, you're up a creek already and now a lighter trigger is going to be a real issue.
     
  5. roadkill46

    roadkill46

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    gotta love that Accutrigger! i have the 10FPSR, with Sandstorm can in .308. A5 stock, man that thing takes dogs (coyotes) like candy from a baby! I have just a 3.5 connector in my glocks, that's about all i need. i do like the 2 Walther P99's, one compact, with the AS, anti stress trigger. gives you the opportunity to stop right before the bang if you are not sure you want to shoot, take finger out of trigger guard, and then if you make decision to shoot anyway you only have a millimeter and it goes bang, does not reset unless you decock it. love that system.
     
  6. English

    English

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    It all depends on how twitchy you are. None of us has compleltely calm muscles and so they move a little all the time and making small low force movements depends on that twitchiness. The more twitchy we are the less we are able to control small movements and forces.

    Twitchiness varies form person to person and for a given individual from time to time depending on health and immediate stress level. Bench rest shooting is a fairly calm kind of activity and so we can control a very light trigger, unless, of course, we are just about to make the last shot in what could be a world record. If we have been exercising, our hearts will be pounding and we will be less able to control a light trigger. If we are in danger, not only will our heart rates be high but other factors will come into play and we will be even less able to control a light trigger.

    In the extreme, for any individual there is a trigger so light that we cannot touch it without firing and so we have to hold off the trigger and then close the gap to the trigger when we wish to fire. As we do not have good control over the position of the trigger fingerrelative to the trigger we cannot be sure when the gun will fire. We can regard this as conducive to a surprise break or a lack of control, as we choose. At the other end of the scale, too heavy a trigger will make it almost impossible to fire without pulling the gun off aim or producing shake from excessive muscle tension.

    For any level of stress or individual twitchiness we then have a compromise to make. We need the trigger as light as we can control effectively and safely to make accurate shots, but heavy enough to prevent an unintentional shot being made at a time when the finger is on the trigger and a shot is being considered but is not yet decided on.

    It is worth noting that in a situation of enough fear a sufficiently startling response will almost certainly result in a shot being fired. The startle response will overcome any reasonable trigger weight and the extensive practice of moving the trigger finger from frame to trigger will hardly slow this response enough to block the response. How frightened can you get and how cool can you remain when you are that frightened?

    So the answer to the compromise depends on the individual's twitchiness in different expectable mental and physical states and the purpose the gun is expected to be used for. Unless those things can be specified there is no answer to the question.

    English
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 14, 2012
  7. 153

    153

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    I like the factory pull on my four Glocks, I would be uncomfortable with anything lighter.
     
  8. cowboy1964

    cowboy1964

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    I don't want a CCWer with a hair trigger anywhere near me or my family.

    LE doesn't use hair triggers. I love it when someone thinks they know more than they do. Name one professional instructor that recommends hair triggers, especially for CCWers. One.

    If you need a hair trigger to shoot well then you need more practice.

    Why not carry your revolver cocked? Why not carry your 1911 with the thumb safety off? After all, the gun will only fire when you pull the trigger, right?

    :steamed:
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2012
  9. MarkCO

    MarkCO Millennium Member CLM

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    phi1281.

    If you want to discuss something here on GT, that is fine, but please don't just post links to discussions on other sites. If you would rather discuss it somewhere else, that is fine too.
     
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