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The 9 didn't do the job tonight-may switch to .40...

Discussion in 'Caliber Corner' started by bogey3737, Dec 30, 2009.

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  1. bogey3737

    bogey3737 diablo azul

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    Nov 15, 2005
    The Swamp!
    ...for steel plates that is :) Shot my 2nd match ever tonight...combination of cardboard silhouettes and steel targets. Ran it with my G19 and 115 gr FMJs. Had to engage a plate twice after it failed to drop when I hit it the first time. The G19 / G26 still work for me for defense...but I'm thinking a G22 might be in my future for competitive shooting.

    Still finished in the top three, though...so not that bad of a night...
     
  2. Clem Eastwood

    Clem Eastwood

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    Mar 7, 2004
    DFW, TX
    ive never had a 9 fail to put down a plate. .22lr yeah, 9 no.
     


  3. Glock19Fan

    Glock19Fan Cool Guy

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    Mar 25, 2003
    Tennessee
  4. bogey3737

    bogey3737 diablo azul

    550
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    Nov 15, 2005
    The Swamp!
    Makes sense...but that doesn't give me an excuse to buy another gun! :whistling:
     
  5. Glock19Fan

    Glock19Fan Cool Guy

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    Mar 25, 2003
    Tennessee
    Well in that case, you need a mans gun. Get something that starts with a .4.

    :rofl:
     
  6. fredj338

    fredj338

    21,670
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    Dec 22, 2004
    so.cal.
    Just switch to heavier bullets. I've had & seen several poppers fail to drop w/ low 115gr or even 124gr hits. Go to a 147gr & they always go down.
     
  7. 481

    481

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    Feb 20, 2009
    How were the plates "set"? Were the plates calibrated for a specific minimum load or power factor?

    With simple momentum (M x V) transfer where the bullet strikes (and splatters) the plate you can increase either M or V by buying and using a different load after confirming its performance over a chronograph or handload using your preferred bullet weigt over a charge that will knock over the plates.

    I've always had the best luck (and controlability) running 147s @ 950 fps (PF: 139.65) since it is a gently recoiling load that provides the same momentum that could be obtained by running 115s @ 1215 fps.
     
  8. coal

    coal

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    Dec 20, 2009
    What he said.
     
  9. msu_grad_121

    msu_grad_121 BOOSH

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    Sep 16, 2009
    NW Burbs
    I always preferred light and fast in my 9mm when I carried that (got to carry the 40 now, darn it all), but for YOUR particular problem, i'd prescribe a Glock 21 with a conversion to 50 GI! If that don't fix your problem, nothin will!

    Then again, I'm all about overkill...
     
  10. RMTactical

    RMTactical www.AR15pro.net CLM

    12,603
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    Oct 7, 2000
    Behind an AR-15
    My G19 has never had a problem with steel plates.
     
  11. This.

    :laughabove:
     
  12. ComeAndGetThem

    ComeAndGetThem

    464
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    Mar 31, 2007
    Texico
    Winchester White Box Muzzle Energy

    147 grain - 320 lbs/ft
    124 grain - 358 lbs/ft
    115 grain - 362 lbs/ft

    Maybe the OP's plates were heavier than some of yours. Maybe the pivots needed some WD40. But using a lesser powered round would most definitely NOT have caused the plates to fall.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2009
  13. bogey3737

    bogey3737 diablo azul

    550
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    Nov 15, 2005
    The Swamp!
    8" plates, hinged on a base. I don't think they were "tuned" for specific loads.
     
  14. JBP55

    JBP55

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    Louisiana
    Incorrect!
     
  15. pimuk

    pimuk

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    Jan 28, 2004
    Bangkok, THAILAND
    I think in this case momentum-oriented, hence, heavier bullet prevails.
    And a blunt meplat yields better results than a round nose one in the case of angled plate.
     
  16. bogey3737

    bogey3737 diablo azul

    550
    0
    Nov 15, 2005
    The Swamp!
    Yeah...I'm pretty sure that I throw a baseball with less energy than a 115gr 9mm...but I'm willing to bet my fastball will knock down the plate every time.
     
  17. ComeAndGetThem

    ComeAndGetThem

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    Mar 31, 2007
    Texico
    Those numbers were taken off the Winchester website. That makes you incorrect.
     
  18. ComeAndGetThem

    ComeAndGetThem

    464
    1
    Mar 31, 2007
    Texico
    You're partly correct. A Major League baseball weighs 5 ounces or 2,187.5 grains. If you could throw a baseball at 90 miles per hour which is MLB class, that would be 132 fps. The energy of the ball leaving your hand would only be 84.61 lbs/ft which is only about 1/4 the energy of a 115 grain 9mm bullet leaving the muzzle.

    But if your fast ball knocked over the plate as you say when his 9mm didn't, that of course would be defying Newton's law of inertia and that would be like proving that the world is flat.

    There's nothing else at work here.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2009
  19. BuckyP

    BuckyP Lifetime Member

    15,299
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    Feb 1, 2005
    PA
    If you're looking for a competition gun, perhaps look into a G35.