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Temperature resistant computer?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Kevin108, Jun 24, 2010.

  1. Kevin108

    Kevin108 HADOKEN!

    6,626
    719
    Mar 2, 2005
    Virginia Beach, VA
    I know this is not going to be a good environment for a computer but I want to setup a low-end system using mostly parts I already have on hand to put a computer in my garage. Nothing important will be on it. Maybe some PDF files of some service manuals I have for my rolling junk. Internet access will be through my wireless router and I might do some music streaming as well.

    How heat resistant would a standard computer be? I'm considering just mounting the motherboard on the wall, actually and ditching the case all together. I can't remember for sure what the system specs are but I think it's like a 1.2 GHz P3 with 1 GB RAM and a low end video card. I have several old hard drives I can throw at this system as well. I have junk monitors, mice and keyboards as well.

    I'm thinking about running Presto or some other instant-on Linux OS on it. Come to think of it, the ideal setup would probably be a flash drive holding the OS and no hard drive at all...

    Any other ideas or suggestions?
     
  2. Linux3

    Linux3

    1,399
    0
    Dec 31, 2008
    A computer case is designed to direct air flow to the system board. Running a MB without a case, unless you have good air flow in the area, will smoke the board in pretty short order. That's why you should replace IO plates and drive covers if you reconfigure a system.
    As for max temp it's different for different cpu brands and components.
    As an overclocker I want internal case temp to be under 40 C and CPU under 45 C.
     


  3. You really need a case, not only does it direct airflow, but it protects the components.

    As long as you have a half decent heatsink with a fan on the CPU and some case fans you should be fine. It isn't like your going to run the thing overclocked or something like that.

    Put it in a decent case with plenty of case fans and a good heatsink and fan on the CPU and you shouldn't have any troubles.
     
  4. Pierre!

    Pierre! NRA Life Member

    3,966
    140
    Jun 20, 2003
    Lovin Sparks Nv!
    Some of the really low watt processors are pretty easy to work with.

    My office is regularly 90 degrees or more in the summer time, and currently outside ambient temps are in excess of 105 degrees...

    I would use a mid tower case with a front and a rear fan, and be sure that the video card was of the type that requires no fan mounted on it - Integrated video on the MB would be the best. Pick the coolest drives you have, and go for it.

    Solid state - thumb drives - They would be pretty efficient in this application. I would still be concerned about capacity - especially when you bring up streaming.

    Also - check out VIA's line of MB's. I believe they are probably perfect for your current set of specs... and I get the impression that they are rather tough! You would also be able to really reduce the footprint and power required with one of their MB's... And power is heat when you really think about it!

    Have fun with it, and BACK IT UP! :supergrin:
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2010