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Talk to me about Wi-Fi....

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by jdw174, Feb 22, 2013.

  1. jdw174

    jdw174

    732
    35
    Oct 31, 2012
    West Tennessee
    I currently have DSL hookup. Can I just get a wireless router, plug in the DSL and use a wireless laptop anywhere in the house or am I missing something here?
     
  2. Yes, that's exactly what wireless routers do. Connect it to your DSL modem, set it up and enjoy being wireless.
     


  3. deerslayer01

    deerslayer01

    85
    0
    Jan 29, 2013
    SW Virginia
    That is all there is too it, unless you have a very large house. Then you might have to add an access point or wi-fi extender. If you have neighbors close by, make sure you turn on the security features for your router so they cannot easily access it.
     
  4. jdw174

    jdw174

    732
    35
    Oct 31, 2012
    West Tennessee
    Thanks guys. Right now I'm just considering it. Have a desktop that has cables running all over the place. Only thing I hate to give up is my 20" monitor...:(
     
  5. crash22

    crash22 Lost up north

    24
    0
    Nov 6, 2012
    Get a wreless adapter for your pc. It plugs into a usb port and allows wireless to your pc with the 20" monitor. About $20 and works great.
     
  6. Why would you have to give up your 20" monitor?

    Like crash22 said wireless usb adapters for the PC are cheap.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2013
  7. Knellysford

    Knellysford CLM # 21 CLM

    54
    0
    Nov 15, 2001
    Near Gettysburg, PA
    So, Wi-Fi and wireless router are both the same animal???????
     
  8. HerrGlock

    HerrGlock Scouts Out CLM

    23,791
    182
    Dec 28, 2000
    A wireless router uses Wi-Fi to connect to computers and other equipment (Roku, etc)

    However you can get a Wireless Access Point (WAP) which uses Wi-Fi to connect but is not a router.

    Wi-Fi just means the 802.11x standards of computer wireless connections.
     
  9. yellolab

    yellolab

    837
    61
    Apr 15, 2008
    Vermont
    The router is the hardware that "converts" your incoming signal to wireless- thereby giving you a Wifi network.

    Kevin
     
  10. Don H

    Don H

    4,306
    98
    Dec 9, 2005
    If you do get a router be sure that you enable encryption like WPA2-PSK [AES]. Leaving your router open (unsecured) is not a good idea.
     
  11. tcruse

    tcruse

    264
    1
    Jun 10, 2011
    There are two radio bands currenly around 2.4gz and 5g. 2.4g is shared with a lot of other stuff but has better coverage in general. 2.4g has channels that overlap so there are really only 3 that can be used without some interference. 5g has much fewer conflicts and more full channels available. So get a "dual band N router/access point". Many routers can be configured to be an access point also. Repeaters are generally something to be avoided if possible. Always enable encryption to the level that your clients can support. WPA2 is probably the norm today.
     
  12. bill4282

    bill4282

    81
    0
    Jul 9, 2009
    You'll find that you can access the 'net from your wireless router cheaper than thru your phone carrier and I access the 'net with my Wii, IPhone, Nook, net book , laptop and printer thru the router. Means I can be downstairs on my IPhone and send a doc to the printer without climbing stairs.
     
  13. Has everyone forgotten that wireless routers generally have physical ports - you could keep your same wired connection to the computer, nothing changes except you have wifi access to everything the computer has through the cable...
     
  14. The op asked about using their wireless laptop anywhere in their home. Much easier to do that wirelessly then stringing Ethernet wire all over one's home. ;)

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
     
  15. costanza187

    costanza187 I like Macs

    7,640
    805
    May 10, 2003
    Indiana
    Run the cable from the DSL/Cable modem into the "in" jack on the router. It might require a little setup, but it is really easy... you might want to password protect your network.

    After the initial setup, you can use wireless laptops (which i think they all are now), iPod Touch, XBOX 360. Wii, Blu-Ray players etc... on your network.

    Yes I think most wireless routers have like 4 ports to accommodate non-wireless stuff.
     
  16. Ralff

    Ralff

    1,287
    3
    Sep 10, 2008
    Central FL
    I did not find this post hard to understand, but it seems that some did. :tongueout:
     
  17. bill4282

    bill4282

    81
    0
    Jul 9, 2009
    I have a router and modem but can't get my cordless home phone to connect with my DVD player 😃
     
  18. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123 Grumpy Old Guy

    7,177
    1,214
    Jan 25, 2008
    Clarksville, Tn.
    Just make sure the wireless router has the distance you need for your house.
    I use a Netgear N300 for up to 25/35 ft. works well.
     
  19. No, it's not that simple.

    I know with AT&T DSL you have to put the modem into "bridged" mode and then enter the user/pass combo they give you into the proper section on the router.

    It's extremely easy and unless you're a total idiot your ISP tech support could walk you through it in 10 minutes, but it's probably not plug & play, at least not with AT&T's DSL.
     
  20. Ralff

    Ralff

    1,287
    3
    Sep 10, 2008
    Central FL
    That's odd ... I had ATT DSL a few years ago and once your connection was active it supported a router set to DHCP just fine. Just sounds weird that you'd have to set your modem to bridged mode just to supply an IP to your computer/router/whatever device was first in chain.