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Source for bucket of honey?

Discussion in 'Survival/Preparedness Forum' started by lonewolf01, Feb 9, 2012.

  1. lonewolf01

    lonewolf01

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    Feb 12, 2003
    USA
    I have a lot of water, rice and beans but I'd like a 5 gal bucket of honey. A natural sweetner and literaly lasts forever. Anybody know a good source for quality and price?
     
  2. jdavionic

    jdavionic NRA Member

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    Last edited: Feb 9, 2012

  3. I was about to buy a 5 gallon bucket of honey, but with the recent reports of unlabeled Chinese honey being smuggled into the U.S. from India, Australia, and other counties, I decided to buy 1 quart mason jars from a local bee keeper.
     
  4. jdavionic

    jdavionic NRA Member

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    Comment from Lowdown3 in the other referenced thread (pertaining to buying local)
     
  5. Liff

    Liff

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    PNW
    I used to make a lot of mead. I ordered my honey from these guys, http://www.millershoney.com/.
    Store: http://groeb-farms-with-millers-american-honey.myshopify.com/pages/honey
    This is high quality honey. For the flavor and quality it is worth every penny. I have ordered about 6 of the 5 gallon buckets through them.

    Although, realistically, I think you are better off buying smaller containers. How long would it take you to go through 5 gallons (about 60 pounds) of honey? I'd go through about 2 pounds per year if not for the mead.

    Sure the honey won't go rancid, but it will lose it's subtle flavors and it may get dirt/junk in it. Smaller containers are what I would stock.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2012
  6. G23c

    G23c

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    houston, texas
    I agree with Liff, go with smaller (not small) jars. Easier to use and partition.
     
  7. I get it from the local guys.. Look/ask at the local farmer's market, someone will be there selling honey.. ask about a bulk buy.. Or do like my group did.. we put out 3 hives last year.. learning we are.
     
  8. Bolster

    Bolster Not Ready Yet!

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    State of Stupidity
    Honey is great, an immortal food.

    I'm on the cheap, however, and have set aside sugar instead. Your body treats sugar the same as honey (yes, some will argue, but the nutritionists don't), and sugar is "natural" too. Just made by plants, not made by bugs.

    Sugar also has an indefinite life.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
  9. I found my local bee keeper through this site:

    http://www.honeyo.com/org-US_State.shtml

    I bought from a local bee keeper. I was going to get a 5 gallon bucket but he talked me into getting 5 one gallon containers. The stuff is tough to pour out of the big bucket. Plus sometimes you need to warm the honey up as it crystallizes pretty easy. I think I paid close to $150 for the five gallons. Since it lasts practically forever I didn't mind the high price tag. I wish I had picked up some wax as well. Would like to make some candles. Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
  10. jdavionic

    jdavionic NRA Member

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    I believe honey has other qualities that are not found in sugar...e.g., anti-bacteria.

    Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
     
  11. I ran into an odd situation with some honey last year, it would "sugar" very quickly and would not completely reliquify in warn water, even having "crunchies" in it after heating...........and would sugar quickly again. It came from a supplier that takes care of most local stores.
    A local guy (and prepper) told my wife that they must have been feeding the bees sugar water to have done this. We got some honey from him and it was good stuff. He also can supply spring or fall honey.
     
  12. sebecman

    sebecman

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    Maine
    Another vote for

    GO LOCAL!

    and get small containers!
     
  13. Bolster

    Bolster Not Ready Yet!

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    State of Stupidity
    The proof of honey's anti-bacteria quality is that it won't spoil. You have the same proof for sugar...it won't spoil either. Non-spoiling foods are by definition bacteria resistant.

    However, once in the body, these foods lose that quality. Honey doesn't keep you healthier than sugar, although a lot of people erroneously believe so, and there's a lot of internet palaver saying so. It's a holdover from the idea that if humans touch it, it's bad for you, but if it occurs naturally in nature, it's good for you. As a nutritionist told me: "your body doesn't know the difference, but your brain does."
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
  14. lonewolf01

    lonewolf01

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    Feb 12, 2003
    USA
    You just made this difficulkt for me...LOL.

    I want some sweetner for long-term storage in a 5 gal bucket. I thought honey would last longer than sugar...I guess not. I guess I might as well buy 5 gal of sugar put it in milar with and oxygen pack and in the bucket...right?
     
  15. sebecman

    sebecman

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    Maine
    You may want to fact check that.

    Honey has more calories than sugar, you may think that is a negative but that's a plus in my book when calories count.

    Honey has vitamins and minerals, sugar does not.

    Molecularly speaking, honey is simpler than sugar and therfore easier for your body to digest than sugar.
     
  16. sebecman

    sebecman

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    Maine
    No, do some actual research and then decide.

    For instance, there are 1030 calories in a cup of honey. There are 80 cups in a 5 gallon bucket. That equals 82,400 calories in a 5 gallon bucket of honey.

    There are 774 calories in a cup of sugar. at 80 cups that equals 61,920 calories in a 5 gallon bucket of sugar.

    So the guy that stores honey has an additional 20,480 calories in the same space.

    I'll leave the vitamin and mineral comparison to you. If you like you could post it here for all to read and maybe learn from.
     
  17. Liff

    Liff

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    Mar 17, 2006
    PNW
    Ok, challenge accepted. I'll compare honey to Sun Chips.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/sweets/5568/2
    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/snacks/9962/2

    Remember to multiply the nutritional value of the Sun Chips by 7.5 to get a calorie for calorie comparison. Or don't and see that Sun Chips are more healthy for you than honey.

    Folks, it is just sugar. Get over it. Sugar does not turn rancid/spoil/has preservative qualities because the sugar/honey dehydrates the bacteria, just like salt (NaCl). It is not rocket surgery. It is also why spores (dehydrated bacterial genetic information thingies) can remain viable in sugar/honey/salt.

    Store sugar or store honey. Big deal. Probably best to go with smaller containers. Sure you will get more calories per space unit, but it is also going to weigh more per container.

    It is all sugar. Plant/insect/corn, f-it, it is all just sugar. (However buying local is better for the environment and supports local, which is good. China honey is not actual honey. Neither is the honey sauce at KFC. And I wish we could store fried chicken.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
  18. kirgi08

    kirgi08 Watcher. Silver Member

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    Acme proving grounds.
    We barter with a local grower for honey.She has the knack,I can't raise bees,allergies.'08. :fist: