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Solid copper vs. lead jacketed

Discussion in 'Caliber Corner' started by C J, May 4, 2012.

  1. C J

    C J

    87
    0
    Aug 12, 2011
    Does anyone have any thoughts as to solid copper or jacketed lead rounds? I've started to notice references and articles in the various magazines we all read. I'm sure it's really nothing new. I was wondering about the differences besides obvious weight and velocity? I was looking at Black Hills .40, 140gr using a Barnes-TAC bullet. Thanks. Stay safe.
     
  2. fredj338

    fredj338

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    A mono metal bullet can NOT shed it's jacket. In handgun rounds, I don;t think it's that big of a deal unless you shoot thru a lot of auto glass. The cost is ridiculous to practice with. I am fine w/ conventional lead core bullets. Hell, even all lead works fine.
    [​IMG]
     

    Last edited: May 4, 2012

  3. Tiro Fijo

    Tiro Fijo

    6,281
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    May 31, 2011


    Price of copper has gone through the roof in the past few years. Too bad Corbon doesn't own their own mine. :supergrin:
    I saw the other day where an airline co. in the US bought an oil refinery and will save them between $150 - 200 million per year on fuel costs!! :shocked:


    I'm with Fred on lead HP's if no vehicles are involved. The trick is using the correct alloy for the velocity. Softer is better IMO.
     
  4. unit1069

    unit1069

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    Oct 10, 2007
    So. Central US
    Well I'm with fred over the cost of all-copper rounds.

    Back when I owned a micro .380ACP I got caught up in the hype of the DPX round so I bought two boxes. It only took one or two FTEs for me to realize that I'd need to take out a second mortgage to finance enough rounds to give myself the confidence to carry them.

    Because the gun was too "iffy" in the reliability department I'm glad I dropped the idea of carrying that round before I spent myself into Chapter 7 bankruptcy.
     
  5. jeffreybehr

    jeffreybehr Silver Member

    765
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    Mar 14, 2009
    Phoenix, AZ USA
    I use Barnes TAC-XP 125s in my 357SIG loads and love them. In prior pistols in different calibers, I tried some TAC-XPs but didn't keep the pistols. These solid-copper personal-defense bullets perform excellently.
    [​IMG]

    Yes they're expensive even at Cabela's closeout prices where I bought LOTS of these, but when I practice I do shoot perhaps a dozen of them. My regular practice load uses Montana Gold HP125s.
    [​IMG]

    It took longer to find a great load for the looonger bullet, but my current load* develops almost 1400FPS (@ 10') and is 100% reliable.

    The best things in life cost more money; I'm willing to pay it.

    ------------------------------

    * 9.0g. of HS-6, WSP, and Speer nickel case; OAL slightly less than 1.14". WARNING--work up to this slowly. In my 31Gen4, it's quite safe, but this is MY gun, not yours.
     
  6. Tiro Fijo

    Tiro Fijo

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    May 31, 2011
    JB, why the need to practice with the expensive SCHP's since you appear to be an astute reloader? Why not just practice with a handload that duplicates the velocity & POA of your CCW load to save cash? Personally, I love the SCHP's but the price of copper has killed them for LEO & Military service.
     
  7. dkf

    dkf

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    Aug 6, 2010
    Havn't been seeing a lot of real world shooting info with the solid copper rounds. The DPX and Barnes seem to perform very well however I'll stick to a premium JHP now into the forseeable future due to price alone.

    I just wish the all copper bullets were not so darn long. The length takes up quite a bit of real estate in the case and somewhat limits the velocity potential. Since they hold together so well they would be a bullet to push very fast.
     
  8. Tiro Fijo

    Tiro Fijo

    6,281
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    May 31, 2011
  9. jeffreybehr

    jeffreybehr Silver Member

    765
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    Mar 14, 2009
    Phoenix, AZ USA
    I simply like to be sure that they remain 100% reliable AND fresh in the mags. I keep 4 mags loaded and shoot several from each mag. A couple years ago I found a place an hour north of town where I can shoot at waterjugs, etc. The bank on the right is much taller closer to me.
    [​IMG]
    I LOVE to blow 'em up. ALL my reloads go into once-fired Speer nickel cases*, so I don't have to keep the empties separate.

    Another reason I shoot them is that I bought a LOT from Cabela's before they finally ran out; I still have 25 boxes. And another is that I enjoy my slow, methodical, careful process of reloading them.


    * and I have a LOT of them!
     
  10. Warp

    Warp ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    Jul 31, 2005
    Atlanta
    I like all copper bullets for revolvers. No need to put a 50-200 rounds downrange to be confident you won't have a failure to feed, etc, so the high cost isn't much of a factor. My 4" GP100 is loaded with Buffalo Bore loaded 125gr Barnes at the moment.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2012
  11. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Dec 22, 2004
    so.cal.
    You do have to shoot at least a couple mags to prove 100% reliability. Not a huge amount of money, but still, monometal bullets are great, but offer little if any improvement over bonded lead core bullets. If you don't shoot thru a lot of auto galss, I even doubt the "improvement" over non bonded lead core JHP @ typ handgun vel.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2012
  12. VinnieD

    VinnieD

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    Mar 26, 2011
    I don't see the point in them. Copper prices are going up. Honestly I would be holding on to any copper I could get my hands on right now. It's on its way to becoming the poorman's gold. So on top of costing more, copper rounds weigh less, requiring bigger bullets to do the same job.

    I don't think I could shoot something I believed would soon enough be worth more in melt weight than in its original function.
     
  13. Warp

    Warp ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    Jul 31, 2005
    Atlanta
    I don't think we have to quite worry about that.