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So, I've been talking to a recruiter.....

Discussion in 'US Army Forum' started by oneofthose, Aug 31, 2009.

  1. oneofthose

    oneofthose

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    I'm 36 years old, and considering enlisting. It's been nagging at me for over 10 years. My motivations include providing for my family, serving my country, and completing my education.

    Anyone here done this at my age? Any feedback regarding army life, what to expect, working with a recruiter, etc. appreciated.
     
  2. 5 OH GLOCK

    5 OH GLOCK

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  3. oneofthose

    oneofthose

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    Anything you're willing to share about your experience would be greatly appreciated.
     
  4. chuckman

    chuckman

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    I wasn't your age, but I was in my late 20s. Even then, I was considered the 'old man.' I joined the Navy, and though the RDC's (Navy-speak for drill instructor) would argue otherwise, I got a little more latitude and a little less crap, I think, because of my age. It was a little weird to be around much more senior people who were younger than me.
     
  5. The Maggy

    The Maggy

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    Recruiters are like used car salesmen. They will tell you want you want to hear if they think it is going to get you to sign on the line. That being said, if you know its what you want to do then go for it. I've had some older men work for me in the past and I've worked with some older men. As long as you're in good shape and don't expect special treatment you would fit right in.

    To expand on what chuckman is saying, I was 21 and I had a guy that was 37 or 38 working for me. It took a minute to get used to but older people tend to recieve more resposibility due to their maturity in life.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2009
  6. 5 OH GLOCK

    5 OH GLOCK

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    Bump to the top!! I know people can help this guy out..
     
  7. oneofthose

    oneofthose

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    One of the guys in the recruiting office asked me if I thought that might be a problem. I can't imagine it would be a "problem", so I said no. I guess it could be a bit wierd at times, perhaps.

    I hadn't really considered that I might get a bit more latitude because of my age. Actually, I thought it more likely to be the other way around.

    Did your younger peers, equal in rank, treat you differently?
     
  8. paperairplane

    paperairplane

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    Do you have a degree? Are you going in as a private? If so, there is going to be a lot of generation gap. I am 35 and manage 22-25 year olds, I cannot imagine being a contemporary with 18 year olds and taking orders from a 22 year old 2nd lt.
     
  9. oneofthose

    oneofthose

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    A friend who has served in another branch strongly suggested getting certain things in writing. Is that really done? Isn't everything pretty much "in writing"? Exactly what type of things should a potential recruit ask for in writing? Somehow, the thought of asking for something "in writing" would seem to say "I don't really trust you".
     
  10. Army66

    Army66 USA (Ret)

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    Can't speak to basic, I retired at 39. I can say that when I had someone who was older assigned to my section, I would tend to look to them to keep the younger guys in line. Basic might be tough, but after basic it should not be a big issue. Get everything in writing, recruiters are a lot like used car salesman.:cool:
     
  11. oneofthose

    oneofthose

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    I do not have a degree, furthering my education is one of my goals.

    At a previous job, I was often in charge of people older than me. In some cases, I could sense their discomfort in the beginning, and almost always seemed to build a good working relationship with them, and inevitably learned from them too. Hopefully those experiences would help me.

    I guess I'm more concerned how my family would adapt the change in lifestyle. My wife has no family or close friends in the military to talk to. She's mostly forming expectation based on our visit with the recruiter, and info on the army website.
     
  12. oneofthose

    oneofthose

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    I'm hearing that more and more. What types of things should I watch for, that aren't already in writing?
     
  13. Army66

    Army66 USA (Ret)

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    Basically everything. You are signing a contract when you enlist, and it is usually for three years of your life. Make sure that everthing that a recruiter is promising you is in writing, the MOS that you are going for, schooling, first assignment, etc. It is a good career and you will be surprised at what you find yourself doing, like they say, its an adventure.
     
  14. 5 OH GLOCK

    5 OH GLOCK

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    Again back to the top!!!!!

    This guy needs H E L P and he is counting on the GLOCK community for advice...


    So these People that have served H E L P O U T.....
     
  15. oneofthose

    oneofthose

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    Thanks for all your replies. I'll check back again tomorrow.
     
  16. 5 OH GLOCK

    5 OH GLOCK

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  17. betyourlife

    betyourlife on a GLOCK

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    I hate to go against the grain on this one, especially since I too have thoughts of enlisting from time to time. But I don't know that enlisting with a family (wife/kids) is the best thing to do. Being in the military IMO is best when you are single and have no attachments for moves, deployments, etc. and can focus rather than be distracted.

    Also, members of the military have a considerably higher divorce rate. I don't know what's more important to you, your family or joining the military?
     
  18. 5 OH GLOCK

    5 OH GLOCK

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    :thumbsup: :agree:
     
  19. chuckman

    chuckman

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    My younger peers actually treated me as a 'father figure' even though I wasn't that much older. A lot of guys would come to me for advice, mentoring, etc. I always got a lot more responsibility because of my age, which helped me get great evals and thus promoted at a bit of a faster clip. One suggestion is look at the reserves or Nat Guard. In today's climate if you hold the right MOS and you really like it, you can go 'active' without much problem.
     
  20. chuckman

    chuckman

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    There is some truth to this. YOU aren't joining the mil, your entire family is joining the mil. If your wife isn't onboard, you will have problems. This is one reason I switched to the reserve, to make life more compatible for my family.