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Slight problem with my crimp die

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by SC_Dave, Dec 8, 2012.

  1. SC_Dave

    SC_Dave

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    Just installed my Hornady LnL taper crimp/seater die. Got it adjusted properly for seat and crimp as best I can tell thanks to the help here. However, on the down stroke of the ram the cartridge seemd to be catching on something and jarring the press enough to topple the bullet in the next round in the shell plate over. I know it is in seat/crimp die because I have run that step alone. I have pulled the die apart and see nothing obvious. Any ideas?
    David
     
  2. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    So, as the completed bullet leaves the die? I have no idea.

    Why aren't you using a separate taper crimp die?

    Richard
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2012

  3. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    One thing, I suppose: Is there any possibility that the crimp action is bulging the brass? If the bullet and case fit going in (while the case was belled), why wouldn't they fit coming out (after the bell has been removed) unless something has changed.

    Back completely off on the crimp and just seat the bullet. See if that works. Then gently start to add more crimp.

    I am not a fan of seating and crimping with the same die.

    Richard
     
  4. SARDG

    SARDG

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    I'm afraid that (along with plated bullets), combined seat/crimp dies are simply another way for new reloaders to nearly guarantee early failure. Reloading is basically (I believe) a fairly straightforward process, made more and unnecessarily challenging only by plated bullets and combined seat/crimp dies. Plenty of time for challenges down the road.

    Now, if you are out of stations for some reason (bullet feeder, powder check, etc), then, and only then should a new reloader consider seat/crimp in one die. That's MHO which is worth every cent you're paying.
     
  5. SC_Dave

    SC_Dave

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    I do have a bullet feeder die so I'm out of stations. I cannot detect any bulging with my caliper. I blackened a case from half way up to the mouth with a sharpie marker, the only place it's rubbed off is on the very edge of the mouth. Here is a pic of one I just reloaded just in case your experienced eyes see anything.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. SARDG

    SARDG

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    Are you using a bullet feeder yet - or are you thinking future?
     
  7. SC_Dave

    SC_Dave

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    Sardg, I'm using the $28.00 bullet feeder. Hornady bullet feeder die with the clear plastic tube.
     
  8. SARDG

    SARDG

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    If it's not a rotating plate type with a bin, but is a single tube, I believe you are adding a level of complexity that serves more to take a valuable station, than add speed and convenience to your process.
     
  9. SC_Dave

    SC_Dave

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    Noted! I will consider doing just that. It may make me slow down some too. Thanks Sardg.